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Some Real, Some Genuine Fakes
December 28, 2009 9:07 AM   Subscribe


 
Related previously.
posted by Burhanistan at 9:23 AM on December 28, 2009


That was educational.
posted by dortmunder at 9:31 AM on December 28, 2009


SOME NICE PICTURES THERE.
posted by swift at 9:47 AM on December 28, 2009


Definitely putting self-mummification on my "To Consider" list. Bad-ass!
posted by oinopaponton at 9:50 AM on December 28, 2009


god dang. how do they do that?
posted by Jon_Evil at 9:51 AM on December 28, 2009


Was Hieronymus Bosch a Samurai?
posted by Sys Rq at 9:52 AM on December 28, 2009


Shinnyokai-Shonin “living mummy” at Dainichibo Temple (Yamagata prefecture)

I've been there and have seen the mummy a couple of times (that part of Japan is simply incredible and is worth traveling to) up close. The mummy is more than a tourist attraction - Dainichibo Temple is located on a mountainside, way, way, waaaaay off the beaten track - and is instead an object of veneration or perhaps even worship.
posted by KokuRyu at 10:02 AM on December 28, 2009 [1 favorite]


Definitely putting self-mummification on my "To Consider" list.

Self-mummification.
posted by jedicus at 10:11 AM on December 28, 2009


Awesome. I've wanted to know more about this for years.
posted by sciurus at 10:47 AM on December 28, 2009


Mermen have a long and equally creepy history in America as well. (Although to be fair, they were first imported from Japan.)
posted by PlusDistance at 10:53 AM on December 28, 2009


Poor thing, the Pink Tentacle blog post has been inundated with stupid comments. This is fascinating!
posted by sadiehawkinstein at 10:56 AM on December 28, 2009


These are fascinating. But I'm going to have to sleep with a night light tonight. */shivers
posted by njbradburn at 1:19 PM on December 28, 2009


The living mummies of the self-mummification part will give me nightmares for AGES AND AGES. Horrifying.
posted by FunkyHelix at 1:31 PM on December 28, 2009


The living mummies of the self-mummification part will give me nightmares for AGES AND AGES. Horrifying.

It is important to note that, despite the terrifying name, "living mummies" are not, in fact, mothers.
posted by Sys Rq at 1:42 PM on December 28, 2009 [1 favorite]


The living mummies of the self-mummification part will give me nightmares for AGES AND AGES. Horrifying.

If you want to watch another cultural practice from northern Japan involving live burial that will give you nightmares, watch this (nsfw).

Explanation: the family had been stealing food from all the other villagers.
posted by KokuRyu at 4:41 PM on December 28, 2009


biz. arr. o.
posted by msconduct at 5:58 PM on December 28, 2009


As far as I can tell, these are actually gaffs, not real mummies. Being a former sideshow performer, I'm quite interested in the history of gaffs. Contrary to popular belief, Barnum was not the first showman to exhibit gaffs in a sideshow context.

One of the best histories of sideshow (and gaffs) was written by the Canadian A.W. Stencell.

Here in the state of Washington, the most famous gaff is Jake the Alligator Man.

Jake is safely housed in the back of Marsh's Free Museum in a glass case, but there are other gaffs about. It's most sad to see a gaff that is beginning to fall apart.

Not far away in Seaside, OR there is a Ripley's museum that has a "genuine original" Feejee Mermaid.

Perhaps the most well known gaff artist working today is Doug Higley.
posted by Tube at 6:18 PM on December 28, 2009 [4 favorites]


"It is important to note that, despite the terrifying name, "living mummies" are not, in fact, mothers."

Thank goodness! Otherwise I would have nightmares!

The rest of the stuff is kewl. Fascinating.
posted by Jinx of the 2nd Law at 8:03 PM on December 28, 2009


Tea made from urus = they are drinking POISON IVY.

Nirvana can suck it.
posted by rahnefan at 8:31 PM on December 28, 2009


An excellent "mini-Jake" from Washington artist William Bivens.
posted by Tube at 4:33 AM on December 29, 2009


One of those kappa mummies is housed in one of the temples in my neighborhood.


I had no idea.
posted by emmling at 10:52 AM on December 29, 2009


Okay, this is so awesome! Years ago my friend Fred actually found one of these at an estate sale or something and put it on display in his antiques store... not knowing what it was or what to do with it, he named it the "Strange Thing" and charged visitors a quarter to view it. I just sent him a link to this article... he's going to be so excited!

Thanks! :)
posted by miss lynnster at 12:02 PM on December 29, 2009


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