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Won't Get Fooled Again
January 8, 2010 7:35 PM   Subscribe

Won't Get Fooled Again
posted by flapjax at midnite (89 comments total) 24 users marked this as a favorite

 
That's amazing. He's 4, I couldn't tie my own shoes when I was 4. Keith Moon is smiling somewhere.
posted by doctor_negative at 7:39 PM on January 8, 2010


Sheesh - Any Who fan worth their salt knows Keith didn't use a high-hat. Epic fail there, sport.
posted by jalexei at 7:39 PM on January 8, 2010 [1 favorite]


Dayyum. Only wish his drumming was a bit lower in the mix since the miking is so terrible there. But that kid is just belting those jams out without so much as a strain. Someone get him some Can ASAP.
posted by Burhanistan at 7:41 PM on January 8, 2010 [1 favorite]


I guess he just figured out Santa isn't real.

Cause he's mad about being fooled.

And he won't get fooled again.

!! *strum* *drum drum drum*
posted by The Devil Tesla at 7:42 PM on January 8, 2010 [2 favorites]


great! made me smile, and it's been a crappy day!
posted by HuronBob at 7:46 PM on January 8, 2010 [3 favorites]


Jesus Hamster Christ.  Having just turned 44, I'm now an ORDER of MAGNITUDE behind my dream of being as good a drummer as that.  Or something. The math went south about the same time as the music practice.
posted by Hardcore Poser at 7:48 PM on January 8, 2010 [1 favorite]


This is why I never became a drummer.

Oh, as a teenager I tried, I just wasn't as good as this kid is at 4 years old.
posted by bwg at 7:49 PM on January 8, 2010


Here he does Tom Sawyer. I love this kid.
posted by Burhanistan at 7:50 PM on January 8, 2010


The evidence is irrefutable: Keith Moon has reincarnated as this kid.
posted by teferi at 7:51 PM on January 8, 2010 [3 favorites]


Gotta love his background mascot.
posted by Burhanistan at 7:51 PM on January 8, 2010 [2 favorites]


Fucking awesome on every possible level.
posted by joe lisboa at 8:02 PM on January 8, 2010 [1 favorite]


This is one of the best Keith Moon instructional videos I've ever seen.
posted by abc123xyzinfinity at 8:14 PM on January 8, 2010


Yeah!
posted by nola at 8:14 PM on January 8, 2010


my heart.
it is warm.
posted by june made him a gemini at 8:16 PM on January 8, 2010


I'd like to have half his talent when I grow up!
posted by mdrosen at 8:16 PM on January 8, 2010


Yes!

All I can manage, beat-wise, is this rather standard rock number.
posted by flabdablet at 8:19 PM on January 8, 2010


Shockingly uncharacteristic lack of snark and skepticism in this thread. I've had a hard week, however and have sent the clip to a professional drummer friend of mine in LA for her professional opinion. ;> Cute kid, though.
posted by njbradburn at 8:26 PM on January 8, 2010


I'd hate to see what he could do to a hotel room.
posted by raysmj at 8:33 PM on January 8, 2010 [10 favorites]


Holy shit!
posted by aerotive at 8:36 PM on January 8, 2010


\m/
posted by middleclasstool at 8:42 PM on January 8, 2010 [1 favorite]


I can't hear it without:

"Looks like someone is about to learn the meaning of justice; everglades style."

YEAAAAAAAAAOOOOOOOW!!!!

posted by Mid at 8:46 PM on January 8, 2010 [1 favorite]


[this is good]
posted by KGMoney at 8:54 PM on January 8, 2010


I particularly like AC/DC - Whole Lotta Rosie, where he sqeaks at 11 seconds in. Crikey, that kid's like a little automaton. Apparently, he's wanted to drum since age 3.
posted by filthy light thief at 9:01 PM on January 8, 2010


Amazing. I'm impressed with his skillz.
posted by Malice at 9:04 PM on January 8, 2010


Reminds me of Victor Wooten's little boy: vid1 vid2

Man, if he sticks with it... Watch out Virgil Donati!
posted by LordSludge at 9:15 PM on January 8, 2010


Goodnight Keith Moon, Good Morning Jonah!
posted by chambers at 9:19 PM on January 8, 2010 [1 favorite]


The kid kind of reminds me of Max Weinberg - most of the time he just stares straight ahead and smiles, while flailing away on the drum kit.
posted by KokuRyu at 9:20 PM on January 8, 2010


I imagine myself, fifteen years from now, coming across a news article on the Globalwide Intertron about this person, now a famous drummer, and thinking about that talented little kid I saw eons ago on some node called TubeYou or something, wondering if it's really the same person or if my memory augments are corrupt. Also, I finally have a flying car.
posted by The Lurkers Support Me in Email at 9:20 PM on January 8, 2010 [3 favorites]


Kid likes his cymbals. Can't argue with that.
posted by dirigibleman at 9:44 PM on January 8, 2010


Plus, Neil Peart didn't fucking squeal! at the end of Tom Sawyer.
posted by dirigibleman at 9:46 PM on January 8, 2010 [1 favorite]


Can we put him to work on this?
posted by evilcolonel at 9:52 PM on January 8, 2010


Prior (different) 4-year old drummer post.
posted by Mid at 9:53 PM on January 8, 2010


That's nothing. At four, I choked on my own vomit and died.

That kid is amazing.
posted by Joey Michaels at 10:44 PM on January 8, 2010 [1 favorite]


Can't be reincarnated Keith Moon. The drum kit was in tact at the end of the number. No explosions, no cars in pools, no Keith Moon.
posted by Goofyy at 10:53 PM on January 8, 2010


BIG JERK ALERT:

How much you wanna bet he ends up a nameless session drummer?
posted by Joseph Gurl at 4:11 AM on January 9, 2010


Keith Moon was just a big kid on drums, really: bang everything whenever and wherever possible. This kid gets that instinctively.
posted by spoobnooble at 4:59 AM on January 9, 2010


What I like is the sheepish grins as he starts to drum, he is clearly loving it and able to enjoy it without much if any concentration.

As for him ending up a session drummer its possible but you've got to think he has the potential to be in demand.
posted by therubettes at 5:54 AM on January 9, 2010


HOLY FLOCKING SCHMIDT!
posted by punkfloyd at 6:00 AM on January 9, 2010


It should perhaps be noted that a quality session musician often makes a lot more money than someone in a "successful" band.
posted by the bricabrac man at 6:26 AM on January 9, 2010 [2 favorites]


And if that's not the sign of a great musician, I don't know what is.
posted by Joseph Gurl at 6:37 AM on January 9, 2010


Oh, wait, I don't think that.
posted by Joseph Gurl at 6:37 AM on January 9, 2010


Just want to say that you can't TRULY appreciate this unless you have a 4-year-old kid in your house who likes to play drums. My kid sounds.... not like this kid.
posted by escabeche at 6:44 AM on January 9, 2010 [2 favorites]


Well played, kid. Really well done.
posted by Wolof at 6:54 AM on January 9, 2010


As a bass player, he can be in my band any time.

Old, but related, check out this video resume. The effortless way he bangs out rock, disco, funk and new wave grooves fills me with an unspeakable amount of joy.
posted by clvrmnky at 7:24 AM on January 9, 2010 [1 favorite]


I've seen a lot of things in my life but that was............awesome!!!!
posted by leetheflea at 8:49 AM on January 9, 2010


New from Ronco: Baby's First 60+ Db Headphones!

wow. just......wow. what i loved the most was watching him concentrate on Tom Sawyer. he's not quite as smooth on it as some of the other tracks, but you can almost see the connections being made. rock on, jonah!!
posted by CitizenD at 8:49 AM on January 9, 2010


It should perhaps be noted that quality session players are often much better musicians than people in "bands".
posted by kenko at 8:54 AM on January 9, 2010


Bernard Purdie was a session drummer. Tony Levin was a session bassist. The Funk Brothers were session players. Lots of bands are formed out of session players—most of Led Zeppelin were session players. The Wrecking Crew were session players. Booker T and the MGs started out as a house band. Prominent (to other musicians) session players are often highly esteemed (by other musicians). Being a session musician is in no way failing to be a success—it just probably means that you aren't very famous.

Some might propose that the pursuit of fame and the pursuit of musical excellence aren't the same thing at all! It's hard to see why you'd think you're being a big jerk for suggesting he might become a session drummer, unless you think that no one would enjoy playing drums (of all things) except for the name recognition that might come h/h way. Which would be kind of a jerky thing, actually.
posted by kenko at 9:02 AM on January 9, 2010 [3 favorites]


Whelp, I feel like I've failed at life now. Sigh.
posted by five fresh fish at 9:08 AM on January 9, 2010


The attention span the kid has at age 4 is as impressive as the drumming. Eight and a half minutes straight!
posted by Stewriffic at 9:19 AM on January 9, 2010


I imagine myself, fifteen years from now, coming across a news article on the Globalwide Intertron about this person, now a famous drummer, and thinking about that talented little kid I saw eons ago on some node called TubeYou or something, wondering if it's really the same person or if my memory augments are corrupt. Also, I finally have a flying car.

Also, they can dust for vomit.
posted by The Bellman at 9:23 AM on January 9, 2010


I'd pay money to hear Jonah play along with Bad Brains' 'Pay To Cum'.
posted by spoobnooble at 10:06 AM on January 9, 2010


That made me happy like few things do. For those that know, is he playing the recorded drums verbatim, or making stuff up?
posted by StickyCarpet at 11:29 AM on January 9, 2010


I'm a drummer/percussionist, and have seen/heard/known the best in jazz, rock, and world (international) music. The kid is impressive, but his parents aren't doing him any favors by introducing his to isolating headphones that drive heavy db's into his ears at his young (or any) age. Also, seriously too (way too) heavy on the cymbals! I suppose that's in keeping with the intent of the original song, so it's forgivable. Drumming is more than about keeping a well-timed beat; it's about keeping *tasteful* time. Here's hoping the kid gets solid instruction, learns about taste, and that there's more to drumming besides sitting on a stage podium and pounding a drum set to really good time as loud as you can. That's what I see most "famous" rock drummers do; that's what most of the listening public sees/hears, etc. - so they think that "hey, that guy is a good drummer". They don't what they're missing!
posted by Vibrissae at 12:09 PM on January 9, 2010 [1 favorite]


HARVESTER OF SORROW - Metallica!!

His face on this one is priceless. This kid rocks! Someone please post him again in a few years, as I'm quite excited to see his progress.
posted by lazaruslong at 12:11 PM on January 9, 2010


Ok, I'll bite: how can you tell that there's a four-year-old drummer at the door?
posted by Zonker at 12:49 PM on January 9, 2010


This clip is scientific proof that if you've heard Whole Lotta Rosie at least once, something is hardwired in humans to involuntarily scream the "YOU CAN SAY SHE'S GOT IT ALL!!!!!" part along with Bon Scott on every subsequent listening. Even a four year old does it. I believe Eleanor Roosevelt would have, had she lived long enough.
posted by stupidsexyFlanders at 12:52 PM on January 9, 2010 [1 favorite]


I am so in love with this little guy, I want to eat him up with a spoon. That said, I wonder what his parents think of all the NOISE in their house. Kids got mad skills, no doubt, but I think all the noise would drive me bonkers.
posted by msali at 1:14 PM on January 9, 2010


That's a pretty sweet kit, too.
posted by shakespeherian at 1:51 PM on January 9, 2010


He's awesome! It's amazing not because it's perfect, but because of how many of those really distinct Moonisms he's picked up.

I really just hope it's not because it's being drilled into him by his parents or something.
posted by anazgnos at 2:13 PM on January 9, 2010


Wow. That's phenomenal. I wonder if he learned to play using Rock Band or Band Hero or something?

The kid's got a big headstart on Keith. I think Keith Moon didn't start playing the drums until he was in his teens.
posted by jiroczech at 3:22 PM on January 9, 2010


his parents aren't doing him any favors by introducing his to isolating headphones that drive heavy db's into his ears

Eh? Isn't he wearing hearing protection? The way I read it, you're suggesting that the headgear is muting high frequencies, but allowing low frequencies to remain loud. That makes no sense to me.
posted by five fresh fish at 4:00 PM on January 9, 2010


Is that hearing protection? On first look I thought they were wireless studio cans, playing into the kids ears. If I'm midtaken, my bad, and strike that part of my opinion as misinformed, but I stand by everything else. Keith Moon, in my opinion, was a noisemaker. That's not a bad thing as far as it goes, but in no way does he compare to the *great* drummers here in the States, or elsewhere. He's a very good "rock n' roll" drummer, of a certain kind.

btw, Steve Gadd is the one who set the tone for grove in rock drumming. Check out Gadd's discography; there has been no greater influence on modern pop drumming that Gadd, period. Maybe it's because I'm a percussionist, and know more about drumming than the man on the street, but it saddens me to see the Keith Moon model put up there as the apex of pop drumming; it's not, and he's not. It's also sad to see talented aspiring drummers imitating Moon's style as something to aspire to. It's all good, but not all good is great.
posted by Vibrissae at 5:35 PM on January 9, 2010


I have no idea what the hell he's wearing. If they're wireless studio headphones, what is it that they're doing? Isolating... what? And why would they be cranked high enough to harm?

I'm not a musician and do not play one on YouTube. I always figured musicians wearing those sorts of things were being smart and protecting their hearing, not dumb and destroying it.
posted by five fresh fish at 5:41 PM on January 9, 2010


Bernard Purdie was a session drummer. Tony Levin was a session bassist. The Funk Brothers were session players. Lots of bands are formed out of session players—most of Led Zeppelin were session players. The Wrecking Crew were session players. Booker T and the MGs started out as a house band. Prominent (to other musicians) session players are often highly esteemed (by other musicians). Being a session musician is in no way failing to be a success—it just probably means that you aren't very famous.

Some might propose that the pursuit of fame and the pursuit of musical excellence aren't the same thing at all! It's hard to see why you'd think you're being a big jerk for suggesting he might become a session drummer, unless you think that no one would enjoy playing drums (of all things) except for the name recognition that might come h/h way. Which would be kind of a jerky thing, actually.


I wasn't at all talking about fame, but rather creativity. Session musicians are fantastically skilled, but that skill is used in the service of other people's musical vision.

I'd find that a sorry fate. That's all I was saying.
posted by Joseph Gurl at 7:57 PM on January 9, 2010


Dude!
posted by chairface at 10:37 PM on January 9, 2010


Drumming is more than about keeping a well-timed beat; it's about keeping *tasteful* time.

Oh, balls. Drumming is about doing whatever it takes to make the player happy behind the kit, and the people they're playing with happy to have them there; and if there's an audience to reflect and focus that happiness back on the band, so much the better.

If Steve Gadd's tasteful technical wizardry floats your boat, I'm happy for you. Personally, listening to him doing something complicated does much less for me than hearing and feeling Nick Mason doing something simple with absolute conviction.

Moon couldn't play like Gadd; so what? I think of Keith Moon as one of the greats, not because hey, is that a six stroke roll at 1:33, but because I'm moved by his playing.

This kid already knows what he wants to do with his kit, and he's been doing it since he was three. More power to his wrists, says I, and long may he play free of interference from well meaning arty types who want to convince him he's doing it wrong.
posted by flabdablet at 10:43 PM on January 9, 2010 [3 favorites]


Destined to become an unknown session musician like everybody else with oodles of talent and an unknown quantity of creativity
posted by tehloki at 12:05 AM on January 10, 2010


I find Steve Gadd and Keith Moon are both devastatingly effective in their respective contexts. I don't know why people think they have to choose.

Gadd has a wider range, but Moon completely owned his thing, which suited The 'Oo perfectly. And I can identify either's playing within a few beats, which is really the goal here. Attaining your own personal voice, being able to put your fingerprint on something that stamps it as your work and nobody else's, is vanishingly rare, and worthy of respect.
posted by Wolof at 5:50 AM on January 10, 2010 [2 favorites]


I especially love his expressions during the synthesizer break about 6:35 in. It's real obvious that he's having fun and loves the attention.
posted by Slack-a-gogo at 8:28 AM on January 10, 2010


Holy Crap - I thought you were joking about "Whole Lotta Rosie"!!!! That rocks!
posted by Slack-a-gogo at 8:31 AM on January 10, 2010


Personally, listening to him doing something complicated does much less for me than hearing and feeling Nick Mason doing something simple with absolute conviction.

If I remember correctly, he looses a stick in the middle of that and brings out another. It's so smooth I missed it the first few times I watched it. The beat recalculation he does in his head, in a fraction of a second, to compensate while he grabs for the stick is amazing to watch.

As an aside: As a teenage sound man and recording engineer in the early 90's, Live at Pompeii taught me more about mic placement in live and recording settings than just about anything else I was read or taught.
posted by chambers at 10:06 AM on January 10, 2010


Stick flies from his hand at 5:02, on the first beat of a fill.

The way he handles it convinces me that most of that recalculation isn't in his head. Brainstem, maybe.

Thinking is too slow.
posted by flabdablet at 3:15 PM on January 10, 2010


Drumming is about doing whatever it takes to make the player happy behind the kit, and the people they're playing with happy to have them there; and if there's an audience to reflect and focus that happiness back on the band, so much the better.

But some drummers do that better than others - wouldn't you agree? We can have a discussion about "who's best" until we're blue in the face, but there is a body of work out there by great percussionists that makes them great, and some greater than others. That's a fact.

Arguably, one could try to make a case for Roger Maris being "greater" than Babe Ruth, and the progenitor of that point would believe it, but would find that s/he's not in the majority - in fact, far from it. That doesn't mean you can't believe what you want, and make an attempt to make others believe it. Go for it.
posted by Vibrissae at 3:33 PM on January 10, 2010


some drummers do that better than others - wouldn't you agree?

Of course. But everybody's criteria for "better" are going to be different, and I don't think your implied contention that people would prefer Gadd over Moon if they "knew what they were missing" is sound.

You've got Moon filed under "noisemakers", and you're arguing (unless I misread you) that noisemakers don't qualify for greatness. You offer Gadd as an example of somebody who does. All that says, to me, is that you value technical mastery higher than raw emotional power. As I said before: if that's what floats your boat, well and good - but the fact that your own percussive technical skills are superior to those of the vast majority of people doesn't give you a privileged position when it comes to deciding who is great and who is not.

Steve Gadd is a musician's musician.

Keith Moon was a great drummer.

Those are a couple of my personal opinions. I have very little interest in "making others believe" them.

and some greater than others. That's a fact.

No, that's your own value judgement.

It's also sad to see talented aspiring drummers imitating Moon's style as something to aspire to

Maybe that makes you sad. Doesn't make me the least bit sad. Seeing and hearing a little guy who obviously gets Keith makes me very happy indeed.
posted by flabdablet at 4:38 PM on January 10, 2010


What makes me happy is that a four year old kid is having a blast doing something I can't do at all. Makes him pure win in my books.
posted by five fresh fish at 7:08 PM on January 10, 2010


On greatness: this is as tight as a fish's arse. But I imagine little man would much rather be able to sit in for this guy.

Hell, I know I would.
posted by flabdablet at 7:11 PM on January 10, 2010


"As tight as a fish's arse" is going to be the name for my blog.
posted by five fresh fish at 10:46 AM on January 11, 2010


Session musicians are fantastically skilled, but that skill is used in the service of other people's musical vision.

Top session musicians often have input into the proceedings, is my understanding. The Purdie shuffle wasn't someone else's idea.

And, you know, they can do their own thing on their off time. I would even presume that the knowledge that they don't need to make their own thing pay is pretty freeing, actually.
posted by kenko at 11:14 PM on January 11, 2010


Top session musicians often have input into the proceedings

That beat on Late in the Evening was not written by Paul Simon.
posted by Wolof at 12:13 AM on January 12, 2010


Nor did Mr. Simon write the beat for Fifty Ways to Leave Your Lover, though it too was arguably as much of the song's hook as the chorus or whatever. Probably more so.
posted by flapjax at midnite at 1:27 AM on January 12, 2010


But see, that guy worked for Paul Fucking Simon.
posted by Joseph Gurl at 2:05 AM on January 12, 2010


Haha! Yeah, well, I'm no great Simon fan myself, but I can think of worse gigs. I reckon you can't, Joseph Gurl, but... I can.
posted by flapjax at midnite at 3:35 AM on January 12, 2010


Yeah, well, I'm no great Simon fan myself

Oh, go on. The man invented African music and Los Lobos, without which you would have little to post about.

Except some kind of banjo or mandolin rubbish, or Indian music, which is basically the same thing, only less technical and an easier study.
posted by Wolof at 5:07 AM on January 12, 2010 [1 favorite]




Sure, and it's no great evil in the world. I'd rather make my compromises elsewhere, farther away from my music, but that's certainly my own cup of hot fat to nurse.

posted by Joseph Gurl at 6:13 AM on January 12, 2010


Drat, that was in response to Flapjax, but I botched the quote.
posted by Joseph Gurl at 6:14 AM on January 12, 2010


A cup of hot fat and a compromise
a look of fear in the drummer's eyes
tangled up in a sousaphone
pummeled and throttled with a microphone
the engineer's set the board on fire
the faders are flying like a treadless tire
the violin section's been sentenced to death
and the singer just can't catch his breath
no the singer just can't catch his breath
posted by flapjax at midnite at 6:23 AM on January 12, 2010


Looks like the OP's video has been pulled?
posted by cjorgensen at 1:50 PM on January 16, 2010


Yup, cjorgensen, the page now says "this video is private". Such are the fickle ways of Ye Olde Intertubes...
posted by flapjax at midnite at 4:52 PM on January 16, 2010


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