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January 26, 2010 11:46 AM   Subscribe

The Antonucci family of Long Island recaps all five seasons of Lost.
posted by miss lynnster (76 comments total) 17 users marked this as a favorite

 
This is hilariously silly. I love it.

Then again, I'm a Lostophile. Maybe I'm biased.
posted by Plutor at 11:52 AM on January 26, 2010


Granpa smoking the kitchen FTW
posted by The Whelk at 12:02 PM on January 26, 2010


"You're a drunk! stop being a drunk!"

oh he he he.
posted by The Whelk at 12:03 PM on January 26, 2010


That was actually pretty funny. My favorite lines: "We're lost! We're lost!" and "You're an alcoholic! Stop being an alcoholic!"
posted by Nattie at 12:03 PM on January 26, 2010


LOVE it. Makes me want to go put on my Dharma Initiative jumpsuit and drink some Dharma beer**.



**Yeah, it's awful beer, but plentiful. And besides, we need to get rid of it before the bomb goes off.
posted by willmize at 12:04 PM on January 26, 2010


I love the way John Locke says "walk". I keep replaying it.

(So is there a detailed summary some place for those of us who bailed on Season 2 and never went back?)
posted by maudlin at 12:10 PM on January 26, 2010


I've never seen Lost, but it kind of seems like nonsense. Why would an island move? How can you travel through time without plutonium or lightning or Mr. Fusion or multicolored logs and a steam train? Which one of these guys is supposed to be the guy who looks like Mustard Man? I just don't get it.
posted by uncleozzy at 12:13 PM on January 26, 2010


willmize: "Makes me want to go put on my Dharma Initiative jumpsuit"

I've still got this one in my closet.
posted by Plutor at 12:16 PM on January 26, 2010


I started watching Season 1 a few weeks ago when I was laid up sick, but I eventually got sick of the cliche hunky-but-tormented doctor and the bad-girl-with-a-heart-of-gold, and I couldn't watch any more. The weird sci-fi elements everyone talks about seem interesting, but I'm not sure if it's worth sitting down for again.
posted by echo target at 12:20 PM on January 26, 2010


I watched every second of this video.

Damned show makes even less sense than it did, before.

'plains a lot about CLOVERFIELD and STAR TREK, though.
posted by Asim at 12:22 PM on January 26, 2010


@Plutor: Excellent! I'm thinking about rocking one for Halloween this year.
@Maudlin: Here's the Wikipedia link, which isn't half bad. If you want to really go down the rabbit hole, here's the Lostpedia which goes into much greater detail.
posted by willmize at 12:23 PM on January 26, 2010 [1 favorite]


Note: if you have some kind of lame "I watched a few episodes but couldn't get into it, is is worth watching now?" kind of quip, please get up from your PC, go tell it to the nearest actual person. If they give a rat's ass about your disaffection for LOST, then by all means come back and share. Otherwise, pipe down.
posted by Burhanistan at 12:23 PM on January 26, 2010 [12 favorites]


I started watching Season 1 a few weeks ago when I was laid up sick, but I eventually got sick of the cliche hunky-but-tormented doctor and the bad-girl-with-a-heart-of-gold, and I couldn't watch any more. The weird sci-fi elements everyone talks about seem interesting, but I'm not sure if it's worth sitting down for again.

It is, but you do have to sit through a lot of the cliche hunky-but-tormented doctor and the bad-girl-with-a-heart-of-gold. At least for another season or two, then it becomes more about the sci-fi stuff.
posted by SmileyChewtrain at 12:23 PM on January 26, 2010


Good beard recycling.
posted by everichon at 12:25 PM on January 26, 2010 [2 favorites]


I've never seen Lost, but it kind of seems like nonsense. Why would an island move?

I haven't seen a single episode of Lost, but I've tracked various discussions over the years, caught a few scenes, promos etc. And this rather hilarious bit of work from the Antonuccis confirms me in my suspicions that it's the work of a particularly brilliant 14 year old, making shit up as he goes along.
posted by philip-random at 12:28 PM on January 26, 2010


I've never seen Lost, but it kind of seems like nonsense. Why would an island move? How can you travel through time without plutonium or lightning or Mr. Fusion or multicolored logs and a steam train?

Huh. I imagine you must have a hard time with most fictional things, eh?

Whatever you do, don't go see Avatar.
posted by miss lynnster at 12:28 PM on January 26, 2010


Next you're going to tell me that hoverboards do work on water.
posted by uncleozzy at 12:30 PM on January 26, 2010 [4 favorites]


Just gotta throw this out there: I was one of the "they're just throwing shit against the wall" group also, before I drank the kool-aid started watching. Now I'm a believer. Just because it's a complex story doesn't mean there's not a plan. Especially since season 6 has been the end-point since before the fourth season even started.
posted by Plutor at 12:33 PM on January 26, 2010 [1 favorite]



Next you're going to tell me that hoverboards do work on water.

Yeah, but really, why wouldn't they? It's not like there's friction slowing them down.
posted by anazgnos at 12:35 PM on January 26, 2010


They moved the island? Next time my lostophile SO sits down for a marathon screening, I'm in. Looks like I bailed way too soon. (Still wondering where that polar bear in season one came from. Anyone? Bueller?)
posted by dabitch at 12:35 PM on January 26, 2010


Just gotta throw this out there: I was one of the "they're just throwing shit against the wall" group also, before I drank the kool-aid started watching.

It might be more accurate to say that they started with a plan, then became unsure how long the would be able to keep the thing going so they unloaded with a lot of side plot development poo against the wall, then it became clear they had the room to do it like they wanted to so they tied up some loose ends, left some others, and honed the sucker down to the trajectory they wanted to get to, albeit with some evolution on the original concept.
posted by Burhanistan at 12:37 PM on January 26, 2010 [1 favorite]


Next you're going to tell me that hoverboards do work on water.

Only if you've got POWER!
posted by moviehawk at 12:39 PM on January 26, 2010


echo target: I started watching Season 1 a few weeks ago when I was laid up sick, but I eventually got sick of the cliche hunky-but-tormented doctor and the bad-girl-with-a-heart-of-gold, and I couldn't watch any more. The weird sci-fi elements everyone talks about seem interesting, but I'm not sure if it's worth sitting down for again.

You stopped just before it kicked in. The word is the network actively discouraged the producers from doing too much weird sci-fi in the first season, afraid it would scare "regular" tv viewers away. From Season 2 on, the sci-fi takes a more prominent role (though be forewarned that there is still a certain amount of shippy angst among various potential couples), though "answers" to many of the mysteries remain unanswered going into the final season (some view that as a feature, others as a bug).
posted by aught at 12:42 PM on January 26, 2010


Still wondering where that polar bear in season one came from.

Oh, don't worry. They explain it. By then, though, the bear is the least of your confusions.
posted by cmoj at 12:44 PM on January 26, 2010


dabitch: "They moved the island? Next time my lostophile SO sits down for a marathon screening, I'm in. Looks like I bailed way too soon. (Still wondering where that polar bear in season one came from. Anyone? Bueller?)"

Animal Testing. Some characters are imprisoned in the bears' former cages in a later season. (How non-specific was that! I'm impressed with myself.)
posted by minifigs at 12:46 PM on January 26, 2010


They didn't just move the island.

They moved my heart.
posted by blue_beetle at 12:46 PM on January 26, 2010 [7 favorites]


it's the work of a particularly brilliant 14 year old, making shit up as he goes along.

Thus the beauty of Lost.
It is totally made up as they go along, half the reason to watch is seeing how they get themselves out of the corner they painted themselves into last time.

Sometimes, it even makes sense.
posted by madajb at 12:47 PM on January 26, 2010 [3 favorites]


Thanks, SmileyChewTrain and aught! That's a constructive response, and I'll probably skip to Season 2 and try again. Burhanistan, you can pipe down yourself.
posted by echo target at 12:52 PM on January 26, 2010


They're not just making it up as they go, at least not any more. It seems pretty obvious that the initial idea for the show was that they were in purgatory, but since the fans figured that out by the second episode, they decided they'd have to do something else instead. So then they did make it up as they went; the side plot of the Tailies in season 2 is the most egregious example of that.

But once they had a definite end date, some time before season 4, they figured out a way to finish the story without any more detours. Season 4 and on have been pretty good about pushing the plot in a particular direction.
posted by nushustu at 1:08 PM on January 26, 2010


Or on preview, what Burhanistan said.
posted by nushustu at 1:08 PM on January 26, 2010


The guidos and guidettes of Jersey Shore got nuttin' on this family.
posted by ericb at 1:10 PM on January 26, 2010


They moved the island? Next time my lostophile SO sits down for a marathon screening, I'm in. Looks like I bailed way too soon. (Still wondering where that polar bear in season one came from. Anyone? Bueller?)
posted by dabitch at 12:35 PM on January 26 [+] [!]


The answer to that is stranger than the question (or what cmoj said).

L O S T
posted by basicchannel at 1:11 PM on January 26, 2010


Thanks, SmileyChewTrain and aught! That's a constructive response, and I'll probably skip to Season 2 and try again. Burhanistan, you can pipe down yourself.

Whatever, but my comment wasn't only directed at you. In the last thread about LOST (in which this video was linked twice in the comments), several people couldn't resist from indulging in pointless "I stopped watching this" comments.
posted by Burhanistan at 1:13 PM on January 26, 2010


So this plan, it is similar to the one David Lynch had for Twin Peaks, right?
posted by localroger at 1:14 PM on January 26, 2010 [1 favorite]


I'm agreeing with Burhanistan. It's not just the last thread about Lost, it's every fucking thread about Lost. If it were only every once in a while, it would be tolerable, by now it's downright irritating. Sorry, you were a stand in for like 100 other people.
posted by Slarty Bartfast at 1:46 PM on January 26, 2010


It might be more accurate to say that they started with a plan, then became unsure how long the would be able to keep the thing going so they unloaded with a lot of side plot development poo against the wall, then it became clear they had the room to do it like they wanted to so they tied up some loose ends, left some others, and honed the sucker down to the trajectory they wanted to get to, albeit with some evolution on the original concept.

And while they were covering the walls with feces I almost lost all interest. Glad I hung on because the last season was better than any of the previous (thought, of course, the last season wouldn't have been so tight without the previous seasons' setup).
posted by eyeballkid at 1:46 PM on January 26, 2010


they unloaded with a lot of side plot development poo against the wall...

Aaaand voila! Nikki and Paulo!
posted by miss lynnster at 1:59 PM on January 26, 2010 [1 favorite]


Aaaand voila! Nikki and Paulo!

Case in fecal point! (Although that episode is not with out its Shakespearian Tragedy aspects.)
posted by Burhanistan at 2:03 PM on January 26, 2010


Nikki and Paulo is a direct result of the fans screaming for something and then finding out why they should just go ahead and not be in charge of what happens on the show.
posted by shakespeherian at 2:05 PM on January 26, 2010


minifigs: "Animal Testing. Some characters are imprisoned in the bears' former cages in a later season. (How non-specific was that! I'm impressed with myself.)"

It was fine, but cmoj's observation was way more accurate. I completely forgot those cages were for the polar bears, because, who the hell cares about the polar bears anymore? They "moved" the fucking island!
posted by Plutor at 2:07 PM on January 26, 2010


localroger: "So this plan, it is similar to the one David Lynch had for Twin Peaks, right?"

Off topic, but my wife and I watched Twin Peaks for the first time this year. A little on the slow side, but the complex plot felt very modern. I could see that being re-made sometime this decade.
posted by Plutor at 2:10 PM on January 26, 2010


I stopped watching when Whyvrg sryy qbja gur jryy naq jnf junatvat ba gur U-obzo.
posted by everichon at 2:12 PM on January 26, 2010


Burhanistan et al, Why are only fanboy comments relevant and legitimate when discussing Lost? I think it's a weak show. How come I have to pipe down?
posted by Hobgoblin at 2:17 PM on January 26, 2010


After spending the entire summer/fall immersed in this LOST fandom, I am more than ready for the crazy!
posted by roomthreeseventeen at 2:34 PM on January 26, 2010


Plutor: "minifigs: "Animal Testing. Some characters are imprisoned in the bears' former cages in a later season. (How non-specific was that! I'm impressed with myself.)"

It was fine, but cmoj's observation was way more accurate. I completely forgot those cages were for the polar bears, because, who the hell cares about the polar bears anymore? They "moved" the fucking island!
"

True, but you'd be surprised at the number of people that have seen those episodes and still wonder where the polar bears came from.
posted by minifigs at 2:48 PM on January 26, 2010


Off topic, but my wife and I watched Twin Peaks for the first time this year. A little on the slow side, but the complex plot felt very modern. I could see that being re-made sometime this decade.

My god I hope not!
posted by SmileyChewtrain at 3:00 PM on January 26, 2010


It seems pretty obvious that the initial idea for the show was that they were in purgatory, but since the fans figured that out by the second episode, they decided they'd have to do something else instead.

Dude, no way. That smacks of the "There are *souls* in Lucius's briefcase!" theory of Pulp Fiction. The real answer might be more elaborate and ridiculous, but there's just no evidence for that one. I mean, are polar bears a typical piece of fauna in Purgatory?

Burhanistan et al, Why are only fanboy comments relevant and legitimate when discussing Lost? I think it's a weak show. How come I have to pipe down?

That's fine. There are plenty of things I think are weak or were poorly handled about the show, and I'll happily discuss them with anyone who cares. But just showing up, tossing off "I think it's a weak show" or "Is this something I'd need a TV to care about?" or whatever isn't "discussing." It's opinion by drive-by, and not constructive. You don't have to be a fanboy, but you do have to actually have something to contribute. If anyone wants to get into the obnoxiousness of Michael, or the iffy Sawyer character arc, or clich├ęs in Sayid's background, I'm sure their opinions would be welcome.
posted by Amanojaku at 3:19 PM on January 26, 2010 [2 favorites]


I love watching LOST, if only to see if they fixed the "S" in the opening logo yet. For some reason when they rendered it out it had these glitchy polygon seams in it and it triggers some sort of latent OCD reaction in my head.
posted by hellphish at 3:33 PM on January 26, 2010 [3 favorites]


Burhanistan et al, Why are only fanboy comments relevant and legitimate when discussing Lost? I think it's a weak show. How come I have to pipe down?

Because you're like a child who wanders into the middle of a show with an extraordinarily dense story web and wants to know...

What is the point?

There's no reason - this is my point: There's no fucking reason that I should have to see Twilight before I get to make fun of it any more if no one else is going to follow the rules and watch the stuff they want to complain about!
posted by cmoj at 3:53 PM on January 26, 2010 [1 favorite]


Burhanistan et al, Why are only fanboy comments relevant and legitimate when discussing Lost? I think it's a weak show. How come I have to pipe down?

Nobody's told you to pipe down, and I'd be interested to hear your critique. I think what people were criticizing were the I haven't watched the show in years is it any good? I doubt it! comments which invariably make up much of any LOST thread despite the fact that they are very boring.
posted by moxiedoll at 4:03 PM on January 26, 2010


That you lost interest in a show is not interesting to anyone else. If someone who disliked the show wants to bring up thoughtful criticisms of the show that actually, you know, provoke thought and discussion then there isn't a problem.
posted by basicchannel at 4:07 PM on January 26, 2010 [1 favorite]


I only watched all of Lost recently, so I kind of missed the week-by-week, season-by-season aspect of it. But I don't think I really care how it ends. Because it's fun. Yes, sometimes there are many stupid things that go on and there are many dull characters (like the ones I think we're supposed to care the most about) but it's good "what's going to happen next?" storytelling. It's a comic book on TV.

I'm excited for this season. I expect to be thrilled and infuriated (in a good way) and probably, ultimately, disappointed. But I will have had fun getting there. It's not just about what happens for me, or even why. It's the how it happens. It's good entertainment.
posted by darksong at 4:29 PM on January 26, 2010 [1 favorite]


I love watching LOST, if only to see if they fixed the "S" in the opening logo yet. For some reason when they rendered it out it had these glitchy polygon seams in it and it triggers some sort of latent OCD reaction in my head.

Can't remember where I read this (though someone in the comments of this post mentions the same info and says it's from a behind-the-scenes featurette) but it's because J.J. Abrams made the title sequence himself as a rough version, and they never bothered to redo it.
posted by chrominance at 5:00 PM on January 26, 2010


The Season five finale was so ambitious and entertaining I was blown away. Time travel, the most important person on the show being burned alive, and a fucking H-BOMB!

I don't know who could be bored by this.........
posted by lattiboy at 5:32 PM on January 26, 2010


time travel, people being burned alive, H-bombs -- how boring!




but seriously ... as a non-LOST-er, the more I hear about the show, the more it brings to mind THE PRISONER, except, of course, it concerns the dilemmas of several lost people, except one. But the basic theme of characters finding themselves inexplicably in a strange zone that seems to be not just off the grid but maybe off the space-time-continuum altogether rings familiar (and not necessarily in a bad way).

I'm curious if anyone out there's a fan of both and whether they think I'm entirely off the mark here.
posted by philip-random at 5:56 PM on January 26, 2010


I completely forgot those cages were for the polar bears, because, who the hell cares about the polar bears anymore? They "moved" the fucking island!

I'm pretty sure the polar bears actually had quite a bit to do with getting the island moved in the first place. There's a certain amount of in-show evidence (i.e. the frozen cavern with the wheel, and the bridled polar bear skeleton found in Tunisia) indicating that the DHARMA folks were using the polar bears as draft animals. Since the main side effect of turning the wheel and moving the island was being teleported all the way to Tunisia, I'm guessing that DHARMA found it easier to lose a polar bear than to pay for their grunts' busfare back from North Africa.
posted by Strange Interlude at 6:15 PM on January 26, 2010 [3 favorites]


I think this recap's pretty funny too, but you probably have to be familiar with the show to really appreciate it:

Previously On Lost 2: Lost In Five Minutes
posted by miratime at 6:16 PM on January 26, 2010 [1 favorite]


Well, some people get to the island unexpectedly (a plane crash, say) nobody inexplicably found themselves on the island - people go to and fro via helicopters, boats, and submarines. The island is magical and mysterious, but people can get there and leave on purpose - and for a few seasons now about half of the action takes place elsewhere in the world.
posted by moxiedoll at 6:19 PM on January 26, 2010


I don't remember if LOST's creators have acknowledged The Prisoner as an influence, but it's certain part of the mix. Going from the sheer inexplicablity of the smoke monster (shades of Rover), the weird mindgames being played by DHARMA and the Others (who even have their own bucolic/totalitarian "village"), and the overall question of why the characters are on the Island in the first place ("Why did you resign?"), there's more than enough to link the two.
posted by Strange Interlude at 6:25 PM on January 26, 2010


I love watching LOST, if only to see if they fixed the "S" in the opening logo yet. For some reason when they rendered it out it had these glitchy polygon seams in it and it triggers some sort of latent OCD reaction in my head.

Troubleshooter 1646 to The Computer: hellphish is seeing the fnords. That is all.
posted by mikelieman at 6:30 PM on January 26, 2010


RE: Lost / The Prisoner -
I'm curious if anyone out there's a fan of both and whether they think I'm entirely off the mark here.

I'm a big fan of The Prisoner (the original, haven't seen the remake), and I really enjoy Lost. While there are some general similarities, the uses to which those similar devices are put really make the difference. Both shows are about a group or an individual trying to discover why and how they are in an "impossible predicament." In the case of The Prisoner, the themes involved are more about personal identity, "loyalty," psychological warfare, and society. With Lost, societal themes are touched upon, but in a much different manner (how a group copes with a situation, rather than a direct metaphor for our culture - though an argument could possibly be made...). Other than that, thematically, it's all over the place. Which makes sense, for a successful 6 season show - if the Prisoner had kept up for much more than 20 or so episodes it probably would have gotten really, really annoying.

If I really had to draw similarities, the context would probably be more in the "role in our culture" arena. Twin Peaks (and others) could be lumped in there too: shows that progressed the tolerance of the mainstream to previously fringe (or, just, "non mainstream) ideas in fiction on TV.

So yeah, there are similarities to be found, but they're probably not where you'd expect them.
posted by SmileyChewtrain at 6:33 PM on January 26, 2010


Just gotta throw this out there: I was one of the "they're just throwing shit against the wall" group also, before I drank the kool-aid started watching. Now I'm a believer. Just because it's a complex story doesn't mean there's not a plan. Especially since season 6 has been the end-point since before the fourth season even started.

A co-worker was telling me the same thing, and then I confronted her with the interview with Abrams that talks about how the changed all kinds of things as they went along -- for example, Ben Linus was supposed to be this disposable one-timer, but they were so enchanted with his acting, they enlarged his part, etc. Major seat of the pants flying all the way.
posted by Durn Bronzefist at 6:48 PM on January 26, 2010 [2 favorites]


I'm pretty sure the polar bears actually had quite a bit to do with getting the island moved in the first place. There's a certain amount of in-show evidence (i.e. the frozen cavern with the wheel, and the bridled polar bear skeleton found in Tunisia) indicating that the DHARMA folks were using the polar bears as draft animals. Since the main side effect of turning the wheel and moving the island was being teleported all the way to Tunisia, I'm guessing that DHARMA found it easier to lose a polar bear than to pay for their grunts' busfare back from North Africa.

I'd never thought about this. It's an awesome theory.
posted by odinsdream at 7:06 PM on January 26, 2010


A co-worker was telling me the same thing, and then I confronted her with the interview with Abrams that talks about how the changed all kinds of things as they went along -- for example, Ben Linus was supposed to be this disposable one-timer, but they were so enchanted with his acting, they enlarged his part, etc. Major seat of the pants flying all the way.

My understanding is that Abrams knew what he wanted the show's final destination to be---Matthew Fox apparently knows what the final shot of the show will be---but didn't meticulously map out the route by which it would arrive there. Is there any practical way of mapping out 3 seasons episode for episode years in advance?
I'm fine with tweaking along the way. Compare this approach to The X-Files, where Chris Carter's inability to wrap up all the interesting plot lines was jaw-droppingly obvious.
posted by Bromius at 7:14 PM on January 26, 2010 [1 favorite]


Aaaand voila! Nikki and Paulo!

Case in fecal point! (Although that episode is not with out its Shakespearian Tragedy aspects.)


I think that the writers were in standby mode at this point and didn't want to progress the story along too much in case they painted themselves in a corner later, so Nikki and Paolo was the result. Those two ate up a full hour of primetime television for no reason--they're the ultimate LOST redshirts, in a series with a LOT of redshirts. See also: the origin of Jack's tattoo, and his torrid love affair with Bai Ling! Now that was about as bad as LOST got. They're so lame it looks like all of those plotlines came from unfilmed Red Shoe Diaries or Hitchhiker scripts someone dusted off.

Not long after that, the writers (Carlton and Cuse) won their case with ABC to end the show (apparently ABC wanted it to go on and on, like 24), and the plotline started actually moving again.
posted by zardoz at 8:03 PM on January 26, 2010


Oh I wish I knew these people so they would call me and invite me over and I could go play with them!!

Also, can you imagine how awesome the LOST party at their house is going to be next week?!
posted by iamkimiam at 8:15 PM on January 26, 2010


Not long after that, the writers (Carlton and Cuse)

I think you mean Damon and Lindelof.

I actually consider the Nikki/Paulo episode to be a fun detour from the main mythos, but I understand why the fans got impatient with the characters' very existence. But come on! It was an excuse to have Billy Dee Williams on the show -- what more do you people want?

That said, I'm pretty sure that Bai Ling is Mandarin for "dull, uninvolving plot cul-de-sac." Anybody who saw her horrifically bad one-shot appearance on Angel knows exactly what I'm talking about. They hyped her up for weeks as the Catwoman to David Boreanaz's Batman, and instead we get a retread Star Trek:TNG plot about an alien princess who can burn people alive with her pheromOHMYGOD I'm even boring myself.
posted by Strange Interlude at 8:42 PM on January 26, 2010


You're right, Damon and Lindelof. I dunno where I got those other names.
posted by zardoz at 11:16 PM on January 26, 2010


Can the show ever live up to peoples' explanations of it?
posted by From Bklyn at 1:12 AM on January 27, 2010


zardoz: "Not long after that, the writers (Carlton and Cuse) "
Strange Interlude: "I think you mean Damon and Lindelof."

Not sure if I'm ruining a Laurel and Hardy skit here, but the main producer/writers are Carlton Cuse and Damon Lindelof.
posted by Plutor at 6:52 AM on January 27, 2010 [4 favorites]


I'm pretty sure you mean Lance Armstrong.
posted by shakespeherian at 6:58 AM on January 27, 2010 [1 favorite]


I found the Nikki & Paulo episode to be a weird detour in tone on Lost (the show is rarely that cruel) but I liked that it pretty much was a statement of "We're not going to be messing around anymore. These dumb characters no one liked? Gone." That was kind of the crossing-over point -- the show was moving toward something (the end?) after that, and not just treading water.

After the Bai Ling episode, I made the comment of "Bai Ling plays some sort of magical tattoo artist -- isn't that basically what she always plays?" She's kind of awesomely nutty and entertaining, but that certainly doesn't mean I think she's at all a good actress.
posted by darksong at 11:35 AM on January 27, 2010


I'm pretty sure you mean Lance Neil Armstrong.
posted by From Bklyn at 11:24 PM on January 27, 2010


So, the smoke monster Locke is a "who" not a "what". Interesting. If I were doing the effects/storyboarding for that thing, I would have him/it kill people in more interesting ways than just tossing them around and maiming them. I mean, he is a smoke demon after all. He should be able to infiltrate their lungs and cut them to shards from within. This grabbing by their ankles and tossing them against the wall business is overly cartoonish.
posted by Burhanistan at 9:52 AM on February 3, 2010 [1 favorite]


Yeah, but they blew their entire $100 CGI budget on that lame underwater flying scene.
posted by Plutor at 12:50 PM on February 3, 2010


Plutor: "Yeah, but they blew their entire $100 CGI budget on that lame underwater flying scene."

I was just thinking this morning that the ground-level shot of the Flight 815 breaking up in mid-air was well done for a TV budget and yet Matthew Fox's fake beard in the "We've got to go back!" scenes was like something out of a high school play.
posted by Joe Beese at 9:09 AM on February 17, 2010 [3 favorites]


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