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The Apple Core
January 29, 2010 5:38 PM   Subscribe

Artists Johnny Kelly and Jethro Haynes used 3D printing to create this title sequence for the Dutch TV show Het Klokhuis. [via]
posted by brundlefly (18 comments total) 5 users marked this as a favorite

 
I need a 3d printer now. And a bigger house.
posted by Mister Moofoo at 5:46 PM on January 29, 2010


I was all meh until I saw it was stopmotion. And all those gears just for the 2 seconds of planets??
posted by DU at 5:50 PM on January 29, 2010


Old news. Ain't y'all seen Coraline?
posted by barnacles at 5:57 PM on January 29, 2010


Wouldn't it have been easier to do that by rendering it all? I didn't see anything there that couldn't be done that way except the hand at the beginning.
posted by Chocolate Pickle at 6:09 PM on January 29, 2010


It seems weird to go to the trouble of building all these complicated physical models and then also go to the trouble of making it all look very clean and perfect, like it's a computer render. Cool title sequence though.
posted by echo target at 7:00 PM on January 29, 2010


It would've been "easier" in terms of not having to build physical objects and move them around, but the end result would've been much smoother and more generically CGI. There's ways of imbuing CGI with the imperfect, herky-jerky feel of stop motion, but in most cases it's much easier to just do it as stop motion animation if that's the look you're going for.
posted by Strange Interlude at 7:03 PM on January 29, 2010


Plus it wouldn't have been as fun!
posted by brundlefly at 7:15 PM on January 29, 2010 [1 favorite]


I like the use of the 3D printing here, but my favourite stop motion title sequence remains the one for the Typophile Film Festival. More on the making of here.
posted by hip_plumber at 9:20 PM on January 29, 2010 [2 favorites]


Wouldn't it have been easier to do that by rendering it all?

Ironically he did have to render them, at least as shapes, before sending them to the 3D printer.
posted by odinsdream at 4:52 AM on January 30, 2010


A note for non-Dutch speakers: "Klokhuis" is the Dutch word for an apple core, the place where the seeds are. But that meaning derives from "klokhuis" or "klokkenhuis" meaning the belfry of a church, the place where the bells ("klokken") are. "Klok" also took on the meaning of a time-keeping machine or "clock". So the closing title sequence is a visual pun on the apple core and timekeeping meanings.

The Dutch Apple computer users group is called, naturally, Klokhuis, no relation to the show.
posted by beagle at 7:09 AM on January 30, 2010 [3 favorites]


I am shocked to find out that Coraline was not CG. This technology blurs the separation of CG and reality.
posted by niccolo at 10:35 AM on January 30, 2010


Fairly underwhelmed. I don't see the advantage here by using 3D printing.
posted by Brocktoon at 11:18 AM on January 30, 2010 [1 favorite]


From now on I am going to refer to all regular printers as 2D printers.
posted by aubilenon at 12:16 PM on January 30, 2010


A friend and filmmaker, Eric Dyer, does animated film by rendering loops, printing them to 3D zoetropes and filming them spinning. Cool stuff:

http://userpages.umbc.edu/~dyer/Eric_Dyer/Bellows.html
http://ottawa.awn.com/index.php?option=com_oiaf&task=showfilm&i=8204
posted by jetsetsc at 1:05 PM on January 30, 2010


Brocktoon: "Fairly underwhelmed. I don't see the advantage here by using 3D printing."

Versus sculpting each frame individually? Large savings in time and effort.

Versus doing it purely with CG? As Strange Interlude noted, there would be a significant aesthetic difference. One might as well ask why Coraline or the "Wallace and Gromit" shorts weren't done with CG.
posted by brundlefly at 2:07 PM on January 30, 2010


One might as well ask why Coraline or the "Wallace and Gromit" shorts weren't done with CG. The aesthetic difference in this fairly unimaginitive short is not enough to justify printing dozens of plastic sculptures. Of course, as an animator, it's hard to know that until you do it. CG would've been a better route for this.
posted by gorgor_balabala at 9:20 AM on January 31, 2010


oops, One might as well ask why Coraline or the "Wallace and Gromit" shorts weren't done with CG.
The aesthetic difference in this fairly unimaginitive short is not enough to justify printing dozens of plastic sculptures. Of course, as an animator, it's hard to know that until you do it. CG would've been a better route for this.
posted by gorgor_balabala at 9:21 AM on January 31, 2010


brundlefly: Versus sculpting each frame individually? Large savings in time and effort

Maybe, but maybe not. 3D printing is god-awful slow. And those printers are expensive and high maintenance with warm up and cool down times. Most don't do color yet so those models would still require hand painting. Most of the shapes created didn't really take advantage of 3d printing's unique advantages (except the crystal structure). I'm pretty sure 3D rendering with artificial herky-jerky would have been a much cheaper and easier way to do this little animation. This is doubly true as you need to have 3D models to get the printer to work, so rendering them instead of printing them would be much more effecient.

I do salute the idea and the effort though. And it's possible the technique has something to do with the content of the show that isn't obvious to me (I don't speak the language).
posted by chairface at 9:34 AM on February 21, 2010


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