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Historical Photographs and Documents
February 3, 2010 4:53 AM   Subscribe

The U.S. National Archives' Flickr Photostream. Includes collections of historical photographs and documents | Civil War photos by Mathew Brady | and the Documerica Project by the EPA in the 1970s. There is also a nice set of Ansel Adams landscape photographs.
posted by netbros (7 comments total) 24 users marked this as a favorite

 
My favorite from the collection.
posted by flapjax at midnite at 5:10 AM on February 3, 2010


flapjax at midnite: "My favorite from the collection."

good god those hats.
posted by boo_radley at 6:02 AM on February 3, 2010


I love this. It's like having a museum in my computer.

Other "archival" Flickr member:
Library of Congress
Boston Public Library
MIT Libraries
The White House
posted by backseatpilot at 6:26 AM on February 3, 2010 [1 favorite]


My favorite from the collection.
posted by flapjax at midnite


I have, for the past week, been writing a collection of articles; one is on how women's roles in the United States shifted from "Rosie the Riveter" during World War II to "Suzie Homemaker" afterward. I also need to collect photos to go with these articles.

If it were not for the fact that my audience is in high school, I would be ALL OVER THAT PHOTO.
posted by EmpressCallipygos at 6:34 AM on February 3, 2010


Bah. Too much goodness in the morning when I have to do things like eat.


On a note folks, while you're browsing through them, feel free to add tags on the side. The Matthew Brady shots are simply tagged with Civil War, Matthew Brady, etc. There's no actual content flag which would help people searching for specific photos in the future.
posted by Atreides at 6:34 AM on February 3, 2010


This would be me adding a significant number of new Flickr contacts. How cool.
posted by immlass at 6:53 AM on February 3, 2010


Those Ansel Adams photos look like they're scans or proofs of the original negatives rather than actual prints... so you're only seeing the unfinished product. There are dust marks and water spots that would be taken care of on the final print, as well as issues of contrast and exposure. This isn't a complaint, as an amateur fine-art photographer who's worked with large format, seeing an Adams negative in the raw is awesome.

I've seen reproductions of his work in books and on posters (what most people think of when they think of an Ansel Adams photo) and I've even seen an exhibition of his actual prints (what most art and photo nerds think of when they start raving and grasping for more superlatives to describe his work.) I don't think I've ever seen his work in the raw like this before - even his repros in The Negative and The Print were glammed up for publication.

Seeing the "in camera" part of his process is very interesting - I'm going to spend some time going over them.
posted by Slap*Happy at 8:53 AM on February 3, 2010


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