Join 3,501 readers in helping fund MetaFilter (Hide)


Hot Barbeque!
February 17, 2010 8:23 AM   Subscribe

When we reach these, the bleakest and coldest days of winter, my mind inevitably turns towards the warm days of summer and one of America’s favorite pastimes: Barbeque.

Not grilling, mind you, but genuine Southern-style barbeque, smoked low and slow over an offset hickory hardwood fire in a contraption as humble as a repurposed oil barrel or as elaborate as something that requires a trailer hitch. It used to be this kind of ‘cue was only available in a few states, each with its own distinct style. In Texas, barbeque means dry rub on beef ribs and brisket. South Carolinians love their pork with mustard-based sauces, while their northern brothers just over the state line go for the thin-but-tasty vinegar sauces. Alabama trends towards the spicy, tomato-based sauces served on chicken and pork, although in some areas you’ll also find ‘cue served with Alabama White Sauce, which includes mayo and vinegar. Memphis is famous for its pork ribs, both wet and dry, and local devotees swear by the pulled pork sandwich topped with coleslaw. And of course I’d be remiss if I didn’t mention Kansas City, which some regard as the World Capital of Barbeque. This list is hardly exhaustive, and there's pretty good reading to be had on regional differences here.

Barbeque is seeing something of a renaissance in the last decade; chains like Famous Dave’s and Smokey Bones (warning: seriously obnoxious flash-infested site) are bringing this style of cooking to the rest of the nation, while BBQ Pitmasters on TLC offers the couch-bound a glimpse into the world of competition barbeque.

But if your interest in barbecue cannot be sated by mere TV and glossy corporate menus, you could join The Kansas City Barbeque Society (KCBS for short). KCBS is the world’s largest organization of barbeque aficionados, sponsoring hundreds of ‘cue competitions across the country. As the BBQ Pitmasters show demonstrates, being a competition cook is challenging: it takes a significant investment of time, effort, and money, and it’s rare that the prize money (which usually is in the low hundreds, although the higher-profile events offer larger purses) will ever cover expenses.

For those who are obsessed with the blue smoke, but who lack the equipment and money to DIY, an easier access point is judging. KCBS offers certified judging classes all across the nation, year-round. Over the course of a one-day class, future judges learn what roughly constitutes "good" barbeque versus "bad" barbeque (at least as much as those two can be defined within the highly subjective nature of taste), as well as the myriad rules governing presentation. After passing the class, judges are free to sign up to assist with the many, many events that are planned throughout the season, which typically runs from April through October.

In a typical KCBS-sanctioned event, judges are seated six to a table, and over the course of several hours will sample a minimum of four rounds of meats: chicken, ribs, pulled pork, and beef brisket. Each judges’ table samples six entries for each round. Entries are judged on three categories: appearance, taste, and tenderness. Judging is not on a comparative basis; rather, each entry is judged on its own merit alone. Furthermore, the competition is structured as a double-blind, so judges never know which competitor’s entry they’re sampling.

Judges are not compensated for their time, but the payoff is no less sweet, as you have the privilege of sampling some of the very best ‘cue in the nation prepared by those who are passionate about their food. Y’all hungry yet?

(Sort-of previously.)
posted by shiu mai baby (74 comments total) 61 users marked this as a favorite

 
If only my grill wasn't under a 6' snow drift.
posted by HumanComplex at 8:29 AM on February 17, 2010


This post in song.
posted by BeerFilter at 8:34 AM on February 17, 2010 [4 favorites]


This is FANTASTIC. My mouth is watering just reading the post, and I haven't clicked through to any of the links yet. I know where I'm going for lunch today.
posted by bunnycup at 8:36 AM on February 17, 2010


tl;hungry
posted by chasing at 8:37 AM on February 17, 2010 [2 favorites]


It was the Spanish who first introduced the pig into the Americas and to the American Indians. The Indians, in turn, introduced the Spanish to the concept of true slow cooking with smoke. So, in that first fateful coming together, way back in the 1500s, the Spanish supplied the pig and the Indians showed them how to cook it... It was in that first American colony that the white man first learned to prepare and to eat real barbeque. So, people were eating barbeque in South Carolina even before that name had been applied to the area by the English.

I propose we throw out the Thanksgiving Turkey tradition and replace it with this.
posted by vacapinta at 8:39 AM on February 17, 2010 [6 favorites]


Great post. Just in time for Ash Wednesday, too!
posted by ardgedee at 8:43 AM on February 17, 2010


All the cool DC-area MeFites attend peeedro's friends' annual barbecue and music festival. It's pretty special.
posted by MrMoonPie at 8:43 AM on February 17, 2010 [1 favorite]


Flagged as very mean to people living above the arctic circle.
posted by DU at 8:44 AM on February 17, 2010


I can't seem to introduce tri-tip YouTube, saliva inducing to Texas as a replacement for brisket. This saddens me.

This post, however, has been flagged as fantastic.
posted by WolfDaddy at 8:45 AM on February 17, 2010 [1 favorite]


I love you and want to make babies with you*. This is the greatest post in the history of Metafilter.

*I don't know what sex you are, but we'll make it work somehow.
posted by bondcliff at 8:45 AM on February 17, 2010 [1 favorite]


If I may,

Well this a top shelf post which I truly love, but in the same respect If you are are gonna stick this up while my stomach is grumbling and you are not here with some pulled pork on a bun ....well...you know

All I can say, is let this be my revenge.
posted by timsteil at 8:49 AM on February 17, 2010


My smoker is currently covered with a tarp on the deck, covered in snow. Oh please oh please oh please spring time come quickly.
posted by fusinski at 8:56 AM on February 17, 2010


If only my grill wasn't under a 6' snow drift.

We did a little barbecuing in D.C. this past Thursday: grill perched on a snowbank, Irish coffee, big piece of cardboard for a windscreen.

A lot of fun - get out there!
posted by ryanshepard at 8:56 AM on February 17, 2010 [1 favorite]


Great. Now I have to get back up to Asheville, so I can eat here.
posted by dortmunder at 8:56 AM on February 17, 2010 [2 favorites]


My problem comes trying to match a rub with sauce (some people insist on a dip). I can never figure out which base to use (tomato, mustard, vinegar, etc) to match the spices in my rub. Boiling down the drippings from the water bowl in my electric smoker is a non-starter: it takes too long plus makes the house smell like meat for days.
posted by robocop is bleeding at 9:00 AM on February 17, 2010


Great barbecue blog if you live in Texas or surrounding area:

Full Custom Gospel BBQ.

Here's the blog author's recent article on Dallas BBQ:

The Best Barbecue in Dallas.
posted by ericthegardener at 9:00 AM on February 17, 2010


I'm really glad y'all are enjoying this post. My husband and I are serious bbq freaks, and I'm a firm believer in the more, the merrier approach.

Judging for a KCBS event is ridiculously fun. If you go down that path, it's a treat to stroll through the competition on the night before. Competitors are almost always friendly, and will happily shoot the shit with you and offer you a beer as you chat about the finer points of smoking. They probably won't spill any trade secrets, of course, but there's plenty to be discussed in broad strokes and the camaraderie runs wide and deep -- many of the competitors see each other again and again at various events, so it's sort of a hodgepodge summertime family of sorts.

One of the hardest lessons to learn when you're judging is moderation. As I said in the OP, a KCBS-sanctioned event will feature, at a minimum, four categories of meats, and each judging table tastes six entries in each category. If you take a one-ounce bite of each entry, you'll be eating 24 ounces of meat by the time you're done, and that's in just the four primary categories. The competitions I've been to almost always have a fifth or sixth category as well, which is usually sausage, chef's choice, or dessert.

Thankfully, judges are permitted to take home their leftovers, and those who have been judging a while will always show up with ziplocks and cooler packs in hand. The only minor downside is, as I said, the double-blind setup. While it's absolutely essential to preserve any hint of influence and to ensure the fairest judging environment, it's tough to know if one of the entries you tasted ended up placing in its category.

But yeah, being a judge fucking rocks.
posted by shiu mai baby at 9:05 AM on February 17, 2010 [1 favorite]


If only my grill wasn't under a 6' snow drift.

Your oven broiler can serve as an upside-down grill. Put the meat on the oven rack and put a pan beneath it for drippings (and the makings of a pan sauce ... 'cuz that's just how I roll).
posted by Cool Papa Bell at 9:05 AM on February 17, 2010


For anyone stranded in Central New Jersey, the Whole Foods in Princeton has barbeque pork butt (all-natural, no hormones or antibiotics, organic spices) every summer with vinegar and tomato based sauces (both all natural) available.
posted by jefficator at 9:09 AM on February 17, 2010


my stomach is rumbling like a Missouri summer storm. I'm at least 800 miles from authentic 'q.
posted by scruss at 9:09 AM on February 17, 2010


KCBS offers certified judging classes all across the nation, year-round.

I'm doing this. I am so doing this. I think I may have just found a new life goal.
posted by Faint of Butt at 9:16 AM on February 17, 2010


Vacapinta: I propose we throw out the Thanksgiving Turkey tradition and replace it with this.

And give up turducken? You've got to be kidding. Or, maybe we could do porbeefen. Or turporken Or ...... OMG, the possibilities are endless...... ME WANT Q. NOW.
posted by webhund at 9:18 AM on February 17, 2010 [1 favorite]


I live in Massachusetts, and I use my smoker all winter long. Unfortunately this winter has brought a lot of weekend activity that is NOT barbeque, but I smoked a nice pork rib roast for New Year's.

Haven't done brisket or beef ribs in ages though :(
posted by mkb at 9:22 AM on February 17, 2010


You forgot to mention the hush puppies. Ohhhhh, the hush puppies.
posted by ROU_Xenophobe at 9:23 AM on February 17, 2010 [2 favorites]


If any Houston area mefites go to this meetup, you can check out the barbecue here. My cousin and her husband will be cooking in spaces C317 and C348.

Now that the 4 inches of snow we got last weekend is gone, I might just have to fire up the ole BGE this weekend. This post is great inspiration!
posted by TedW at 9:23 AM on February 17, 2010


[drools]

I used to grill 4-5 nights a week in the spring and summer, but I went vegetarian last September. This fantastic post is seriously testing my willpower.
posted by porn in the woods at 9:24 AM on February 17, 2010


Why would people think that snow is an impediment to BBQ? Other than having to have all your friends indoors? Free your minds! Knock the snow off your grill, smoker, whatever and get going! Free your bellies!
posted by faceonmars at 9:24 AM on February 17, 2010 [1 favorite]


TBH, I have been looking for an excuse for winter grilling. The cold, dry air is probably just right for BBQ. Or at least I'll pretend it is. Anyone have a good recipe for a Weber kettle? (I'm not gonna blow $120 on a smoker I'll use once or twice a year)
posted by mccarty.tim at 9:24 AM on February 17, 2010


Hey guys, let's all send each other meat in the mail, BBQ it our own special way, and then send it back to each other. It'd be just like the cookie swap, but with more protein!
posted by mccarty.tim at 9:26 AM on February 17, 2010 [1 favorite]


I propose we throw out the Thanksgiving Turkey tradition and replace it with this.

Thanksgiving barbeques are not uncommon, especially in California.
posted by filthy light thief at 9:28 AM on February 17, 2010


L'il warning: Famous Daves is not very good IMHO. Their sides are so bad they can make a grown man cry. They've been boiling the corn on the cob for the past decade or so. Look for a local restaurant, even if you live in the Northeast.
posted by mccarty.tim at 9:33 AM on February 17, 2010


A couple Thanksgivings ago, my friend Chuck brought his smoker over and we smoked the turkey. Best damn turkey ever. And it meant that we spent a lot of time standing in the back yard, keeping a very close eye on the smoker, drinking beer and not having to "help" in the kitchen. Awesome.
posted by rtha at 9:33 AM on February 17, 2010


And as an alternative to the KCBS, you can go the Memphis in May route; my brother in law got certified as a judge in their organization.
posted by TedW at 9:35 AM on February 17, 2010


I was just about to post a barbecue FPP, but I might as well put the links in this thread.

Those wishing to learn to master the art of low and slow smoker cooking can do no better than working through Professor Gary Wiviott's 5 Step Weber Smokey Mountain Course. A more in-depth guide has been published as a book.

Interested in the history and culture of BBQ? The Southern BBQ Trail site features an interactive map and oral histories of BBQ (including one with North Carolina legend Ed Mitchell). It is a project brought to you by The Southern Foodways Alliance, which has a wealth of information on all kinds of Southern food.
posted by AceRock at 9:37 AM on February 17, 2010 [6 favorites]


As far as I can tell, there is no good barbecue in New England. On the other hand, while Texas had great barbecue, they lived under the quaint misaprehension that it had something to do with beef...

Pork! Pork is the way!
posted by GenjiandProust at 9:38 AM on February 17, 2010


Wimps. I BBQ all winter long, and live in the frozen tundra that is Canada.

There is no way I will eat an oven-broiled steak when my grill is just outsite.

Ewwww snow? Man-up people.
posted by jkaczor at 9:43 AM on February 17, 2010 [3 favorites]


Pork! Pork is the way!

As an Alabamian, I used to agree. Then I had a Texan show me how to smoke brisket. That brisket was heavenly.
posted by robtf3 at 9:55 AM on February 17, 2010


Anyone have a good recipe for a Weber kettle?
I do! I've used this guy's method a couple of times, with some adjustments, since I'm not willing to have two grills going at once. What I do is use regular charcoal briquettes to start, then use natural hardwood charcoal to supplement the fire. The charcoal keeps the fire burning so that you can add wood chunks (hickory or oak) throughout the process. Not as good as a real smoker or pit, of course, but it works pretty well, and this is coming from a North Carolina boy.

I mean, we're being nice and all, but everyone knows Eastern NC style is the best barbecue out there, right?
posted by MrMoonPie at 10:02 AM on February 17, 2010


My wee Cookshack on the deck is an all-season shrine. My dogs worship it, as do I. It made me a hero in my wife's eyes - what could be better than that?
posted by cairnish at 10:04 AM on February 17, 2010


Ohhh, jkaczor, you're talking about grilling, not barbecue. But you're forgiven, since you're not from North Carolina.
posted by MrMoonPie at 10:06 AM on February 17, 2010


Oh shui mai baby, this post is making me drool just remembering the smoked pork shoulder you delivered to my house...

Yes, that comment was almost solely designed to make the rest of you jealous...
posted by greekphilosophy at 10:06 AM on February 17, 2010


L'il warning: Famous Daves is not very good IMHO.

Huge understatement. Famous Dave's is to BBQ what Panda Express is to American Chinese food.
posted by kmz at 10:07 AM on February 17, 2010 [1 favorite]


BTW, for some great Texas BBQ porn, check out these LTHForum threads: 1 2.
posted by kmz at 10:10 AM on February 17, 2010


Ohhhhh, the hush puppies.

oh and the cheese grits. and while you have the smoker out, the smoked mullet spread with saltines and beer.
posted by toodleydoodley at 10:23 AM on February 17, 2010


TedW: I seriously considered including MiM links; I ultimately elected to omit them only because I'm way more familiar with KCBS. Also, although my exposure to MiM judging rules is limited, they still make me scratch my head. MiM instructs its judges to start at 9 and work down, and say that nothing should ever be judged less than a 7. That "everyone's a winner" sort of scoring leads to tons of ties, and it's kind of a mess, from what I observed. Still, I understand the actual Memphis in May competition is pretty amazing.

Greekphilosophy: you're making me blush, honey.

And yeah, Famous Dave's and the other chains are pretty lousy, although if you are absolutely craving real smoked meat and you're not lucky enough to live in one of the areas that doesn't have an authentic shack, they'll do in a pinch.
posted by shiu mai baby at 10:35 AM on February 17, 2010


As far as I can tell, there is no good barbecue in New England

There's not tons, but it's out there if you look for it. Redbones in Davis Square, Somerville Mass is a decent stand-in.
posted by pupdog at 10:44 AM on February 17, 2010 [1 favorite]


Well, that settles it - I'm building a smoker.

If the neighbors call the fire department when I try to light my charcoal grill, I'd love to see how this thing goes over...</small.
posted by backseatpilot at 10:51 AM on February 17, 2010


TBH, I have been looking for an excuse for winter grilling. The cold, dry air is probably just right for BBQ.

Barbeque is freaking excellent in the winter. I can't keep the heat down sufficiently to slow-roast anything during the summer. Of course every cover I've ever bought for the thing attains the fragility of paper mache in the cold, so I have to go through ridiculous lengths to get it off without tearing it to pieces, but it's oh so worth it.

Thanks for this post.

Incidentally, for those in Ottawa for Winterlude, the new rib shack by the ice sculptures (don't miss those -- much better than ever) is only so-so, though when you're freezing your ass off and your only other choices are Beaver Tails or plain fries (where is the poutine, people?!), you may decide it's worth it anyway. Haven't opened their pack of jerky yet, which does look delicious.
posted by Durn Bronzefist at 10:52 AM on February 17, 2010


And goddamn, I need a proper smoker. Tin foil or little metal box with chips? Does not cut it.
posted by Durn Bronzefist at 10:53 AM on February 17, 2010


AceRock: those links are terrific, and I really wish we had collaborated on this post.

Some further reading, for those looking to get into the art of smoking:

First and foremost, I recommend Smoke & Spice: Cooking with Smoke, the Real Way to Barbecue, by Cheryl and Bill Jamison, is the book that really started us on the smokey path.

Second, Paul Kirk's Championship Barbecue Sauces is fabulous. Kirk is the self-proclaimed "Baron of Barbeque," and boy, does he ever look the part. Man's quite famous among the people who are serious competitors, and a really, really nice guy.

And lastly, Raichlen's Sauces, Rubs, and Marinades, Bastes, Butters, and Glazes has some pretty decent recipes in it.
posted by shiu mai baby at 11:13 AM on February 17, 2010 [3 favorites]


I've never had the patience to cook bbq but love it to death whenever I can find it.

I do cook as many meals as possible (year-round cuz I have a covered deck!) on my gas grill.
posted by jeffmik at 11:30 AM on February 17, 2010


Huh! It's 55 degrees here and sunny, in beautiful seattle. My New Braunfels oil-drum smoker waits patiently on my back deck. I have a whole load of applewood that I can probably get to dry out in the next couple hours. Maybe it's time to smoke a chicken. . . or some salmon. . . or a pork shoulder. . .
posted by KathrynT at 11:57 AM on February 17, 2010


What's wrong with barbequeing in winter, exactly?

/Canadian
posted by sunshinesky at 12:02 PM on February 17, 2010


"Knock the snow off your grill, smoker, whatever and get going! Free your bellies!"

Just tunnel in and get it lit was what I did when I lived in Iowa. Watching the snow slide off and the landing snowflakes turn quickly to water then steam gives the same relief, in fast-forward miniature, as watching the spring thaw.


OP: KathrynT neglected a few twists of the knife from here in Seattle. The azaleas are in full bloom, the crocus' and the daffodils have pushed up and are flowering just ahead of the bluebells and the cherry blossoms all over town are in full riot.
posted by vapidave at 12:07 PM on February 17, 2010


Man, now I'm craving a Gates and Sons BBQ beef sandwich. I grew up on those. (Well, that, and Fritz's smoked meats next door to them. And Hayward's. And a little hole-in-the-wall, out-in-the-middle-of-nowhere shack called Snead's.
posted by dnash at 12:28 PM on February 17, 2010


The Mister and I just returned from his hometown of Danielsville, Georgia, which is also home to Zeb's, one of the best BBQ joints in the world. We brought home two gallons of their Brunswick stew to heat up on these cold Michigan winter nights. Even though it's a chain, I still like Sonny's barbecue a lot (another restaurant we don't have here; I think they're only as far north as Kentucky). Back when I lived on Detroit's east side there was a great fresh poultry and fish market called Vergote's just a few blocks from our house. During the summer months they smoked ribs and rib tips outside on one of those huge oil drums and the aroma would just immediately inspire a Homer Simpson-esque tongue hanging out and droolng response.
posted by Oriole Adams at 12:46 PM on February 17, 2010


And if you can't be hassled with the real thing, Liquid Smoke is for you.
posted by Dragonness at 12:49 PM on February 17, 2010


Ever since Ed Mitchell went corporate on us, here's the best BBQ in NC.
posted by 3.2.3 at 1:25 PM on February 17, 2010 [2 favorites]


Great post, I've been enjoying a lot of BBQ lately.

I've been slow-roasting BBQ pork butts (shoulders) in the oven all Winter. There's a 12 hour brine, dry rub, and about 12 hours in the oven for a 7lb butt and it turns out aaamazing. It makes fantastic pulled pork sandwiches for days. Some wicked deals on pork over the Winter, too. Caught a sale at $1.29/lb the other day.
posted by empyrean at 1:49 PM on February 17, 2010


How to make a smoker from a trash can. It's an electric smoker, to be clear, but I'm totally making one this year.
posted by majick at 1:50 PM on February 17, 2010 [1 favorite]


Dude, you posted the Skylight Inn.

I hate you and love you at the same time.
posted by eriko at 2:10 PM on February 17, 2010


Oh god, this the morning after the night spent up to my ears in grease and ash cleaning out my bbq... I'm almost (almost!) tempted to start it up again this weekend (lovely post, thank you :)
posted by prettypretty at 2:10 PM on February 17, 2010


Yes, everyone come to Memphis in May! Or come to Memphis in another month and I'll tell you all the secretly awesome BBQ places (the Rendevous is great for the experience, but is not the best barbecue we've got). I'm a vegetarian now but I would eat my hand if it was covered in Central Barbecue's sauce. Mmmmmm.

Anyone else out there cringe when someone says they're having a "barbecue" when really they mean "cookout?" Hot dogs and hamburgers are not barbecue. Yeah, I'm one of those southerners.
posted by a.steele at 2:33 PM on February 17, 2010


800 miles, scruss? pshaw.

weeps at lack of bbq in asia

This post is fantastic (and flagged as such). I just got a smoker for Christmas, and my copy of Charcuterie just got here last week. With the weather here (and the foibles of a impulse buy smoker), it's nearly impossible to get it to stay warm enough in the smoker (mmm, cold smoked bacon). I'm looking forward to warmer weather, and the delicious slow smoked meats that we'll consume. Thanks for all the links, and Acerock, thanks for the next set of books I'll be ordering.
posted by Ghidorah at 3:35 PM on February 17, 2010


Anyone else out there cringe when someone says they're having a "barbecue" when really they mean "cookout?"
Yup.
posted by MrMoonPie at 4:16 PM on February 17, 2010


silly sad northern hemisphereans! It's going to be a lovely 32 degrees on saturday, and I'm invited to a barbecue.

Though we're not quite so flash down under, chops and snags is as far as we go, on gas. We're much much lazier.
posted by wilful at 4:23 PM on February 17, 2010


I've made a smoker out of giant terracotta pots a la Alton Brown, and the resulting food was fantastic, but its electric and I couldn't get a great seal on it. Removing that lid every couple hours to change the wood chunks was a hassle too. So I'm springing for a WSM for the coming cue season. The big version (22.5") can hold SIX pork shoulders.
posted by AceRock at 4:24 PM on February 17, 2010


I seriously considered including MiM links; I ultimately elected to omit them only because I'm way more familiar with KCBS. Also, although my exposure to MiM judging rules is limited, they still make me scratch my head. MiM instructs its judges to start at 9 and work down, and say that nothing should ever be judged less than a 7. That "everyone's a winner" sort of scoring leads to tons of ties, and it's kind of a mess, from what I observed. Still, I understand the actual Memphis in May competition is pretty amazing.

The Memphis in May organizing committee really screwed up a few years ago. The competition has a good claim to being the world championship—hell, it is still billed as such. But MiM is more than just the barbecue competition": It's also a month-long music and arts festival. So the organizing committee, who are not BBQ experts but rather political appointees, decided to ditch the old scoring system and alienate the cadre of judges that had been gathering experience since the inception of the contest. The official rationale was to open the competition up to more casual competitors, but the judges I talked to for an article I was writing right after it happened said it was really about taking control of the competition away from the people who basically started it. The old-guard judges actually went on to start a new competition at Shelby Farms in Memphis that I think happens in June or July now, but it's not nearly as big or cool as the big one in Tom Lee Park. But it's just another example of why we can't have nice things in this town.
posted by vibrotronica at 4:24 PM on February 17, 2010 [1 favorite]


And if you can't be hassled with the real thing, Liquid Smoke is for you.

Oh no you didn't
posted by AceRock at 6:39 PM on February 17, 2010 [4 favorites]


Oh no you didn't

*chuckle* Couldn't resist!
posted by Dragonness at 6:41 AM on February 18, 2010


Ugh, Buridan's Ass strikes again. So many great options for building a smoker, that I'm scared to decide and build one.

Do I use my nice and big Weber grill? Do I buy some flower pots (which I've heard can contain lead) and do Alton Brown's electric smoker? Do I try the trash can smoker? Or do I just do the sensible thing and take home a load of smoked meat from the nearest smokehouse?

Being a foodie, I guess the last one's out. I'll probably try smoking some briscut or chicken legs on the Weber grill, and if it goes well, I'll look into how much ceramic flowerpots are at Lowes. It's safe so long as they're unglazed, right?

Also, anyone else find it really hard to find slabs of beef ribs up in NJ? They're all individually cut and of different lengths.
posted by mccarty.tim at 8:51 AM on February 18, 2010


Great post! Not to nit-pick, but in Texas, it's actually pork ribs (spare ribs) that are the bigger deal, not beef. In central Texas (Lockhart, Luling, Elgin) you're also likely to find (beef) shoulder clod and prime rib, in addition to sausage and chicken.
posted by Gilbert at 9:15 AM on February 18, 2010


OP: KathrynT neglected a few twists of the knife from here in Seattle. The azaleas are in full bloom, the crocus' and the daffodils have pushed up and are flowering just ahead of the bluebells and the cherry blossoms all over town are in full riot.
posted by vapidave at 3:07 PM on February 17 [+] [!]


I hate you. What did I move to Florida for? The Judas trees have barely started, my camellias have all bullnosed, haven't seen an azalea to speak of, and only the saucer magnolias are justifying their existence.

well, that's not all true. the black cherries are awake; mixed blessing, that.
posted by toodleydoodley at 7:14 PM on February 19, 2010 [1 favorite]


I missed this post but someone pointed it out in a meetup thread I was skimming and now I'm hungry. I foresee some barbecue in my near future!
posted by immlass at 9:25 AM on February 21, 2010


« Older LARP (Live Avatar Role Playing) (SLYT)...  |  PleaseRobMe.com... Newer »


This thread has been archived and is closed to new comments