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Largest home in America
July 16, 2010 11:58 AM   Subscribe

The immodestly named Versailles1 in Florida is possibly the largest home in America. At 90,000 sqft it is nearly twice the size of the White House and includes 23 bathrooms, a 10 car garage and 10 Segways to get around. The WSJ reports on Touring the (Almost) Largest Home in America. Of course the owners ran out of money and now the hulking shell of Versailles, sitting precariously for the ages a few feet above sea level, is for sale (click through for virtual tour).
posted by stbalbach (76 comments total) 3 users marked this as a favorite

 
subtle.
posted by killy willy at 12:00 PM on July 16, 2010


Vulgar ass-hats.
posted by Mister_A at 12:01 PM on July 16, 2010 [1 favorite]


This photo has been tampered with.
posted by DU at 12:01 PM on July 16, 2010 [1 favorite]


That's an almost evil price:

"We are asking for . . . one hundred million dollars!"
posted by Think_Long at 12:02 PM on July 16, 2010


WHY DO REALTORS DESCRIBE EVERYTHING IN ALL CAPS DO THEY THINK I AM MORE LIKELY TO BUY A PLACE WHOSE DESCRIPTION I CANNOT EAsILY READ
posted by Tomorrowful at 12:02 PM on July 16, 2010 [3 favorites]


Uhh....I was thinking of this but they aren't all that similar after all. Weird.
posted by DU at 12:03 PM on July 16, 2010


But with financing available to make payments as low as $511,177 per month, who couldn't afford this deal? Honestly, if you think that's a lot to pay for a house, you must suffer from a mental defect.
posted by saulgoodman at 12:04 PM on July 16, 2010


Why is that people who long to be American royalty and build themselves palaces have such atrocious taste?
posted by bearwife at 12:04 PM on July 16, 2010 [5 favorites]


For my own amusement I am just going to assume that the owners moved from Paris, Texas.
posted by Babblesort at 12:04 PM on July 16, 2010 [2 favorites]


Tomorrowful, I think that the real-estate listing systems only accept all caps.
posted by octothorpe at 12:06 PM on July 16, 2010


Rich people have such awful taste. Still, I kind of like the ballroom picture - it reminds me of the baroque library in the Clementinum more than the stringfellows-won-the-lotto vibe of the rest of it.
posted by shinybaum at 12:08 PM on July 16, 2010


Perhaps it will be converted to the Jacqueline and David Siegel Bowling Alley and Tavern. Big neon, billboards for 500 miles on major interstates, free RV parking.
posted by jet_silver at 12:11 PM on July 16, 2010 [1 favorite]


To be fair, it's only $75,000,000 as is. The extra $25,000,000 gets it finished to your specifications, which ought to include a retractable swimming pool with rocket launching pad underneath.
posted by IanMorr at 12:11 PM on July 16, 2010 [3 favorites]


Can any music experts comment on the virtual tour music track? It doesn't sound French. More like Spaghetti Western, which I guess is appropriate for a wasteland of broken dreams.
posted by stbalbach at 12:14 PM on July 16, 2010


The only thing more elegant than the home is Jacqueline Siegel.

But seriously they spent $100mm and haven't even gotten past the studs? Looking at the renderings and the finishing is by far the most expensive part of the project. I would think a property developer would have basic, common sense project management skills. I really, really would like to hear the story behind this, did he just give Jacqueline free range over the project? You could easily build at 90,000 sq ft for $3-4million, and that's to completion. Florida's a state where your home can't be confiscated during bankruptcy (last I checked). I wonder if he heavily leveraged his time share and other businesses while putting as much money into the house as possible. It would explain why there's no mention of foreclosure, they simply paid the contractor in installments ... totally speculating at this point but it would go a long way into explaining this.
posted by geoff. at 12:17 PM on July 16, 2010 [1 favorite]


WHY DO REALTORS DESCRIBE EVERYTHING IN ALL CAPS DO THEY THINK I AM MORE LIKELY TO BUY A PLACE WHOSE DESCRIPTION I CANNOT EAsILY READ

BECAUSE HALF THEM ARE FUCKING MORONS
posted by Jim Slade at 12:18 PM on July 16, 2010 [8 favorites]


Why is that people who long to be American royalty and build themselves palaces have such atrocious taste?

Tautology.
posted by kmz at 12:22 PM on July 16, 2010 [4 favorites]


"Location: Flood zone." Whoops.
posted by jokeefe at 12:23 PM on July 16, 2010 [1 favorite]


23 full baths? That is...I can't even imagine why. You only have 13 bedrooms*, why the hell do you need so many bathtubs? Are you throwing bubble-bath themed dinner parties?

*ha ha, "only 13 bedrooms".
posted by padraigin at 12:24 PM on July 16, 2010 [3 favorites]


Why is that people who long to be American royalty and build themselves palaces have such atrocious taste?

It depends on the rich person. Larry Ellison, for example, has pretty good taste (except for those awful dining room and piano room chairs).
posted by longdaysjourney at 12:25 PM on July 16, 2010


"If you want to know what God thinks about money, just look at the people he gives it to."

Old Irish proverb
posted by Relay at 12:26 PM on July 16, 2010 [22 favorites]


23 full baths? That is...I can't even imagine why.

Some of them were probably meant to be bidets.
posted by Smart Dalek at 12:39 PM on July 16, 2010 [2 favorites]


Bing Maps has nice bird's eye aerial photos. You might have to change the view—click the aerial menu and choose bird's eye.

Also, pan to the NE about a quarter mile and check out the 1000' long boardwalks.
posted by I'm Doing the Dishes at 12:39 PM on July 16, 2010


You could easily build at 90,000 sq ft for $3-4million, and that's to completion.

90,000 for $4M? Huuh? Tell me where I can get a home constructed out of permanent materials for $44/sf. The median residential price in this country has gotta be way north of $100/sf and that usually doesn't include indoor swimming pools and marble columns.

$100M is a huge amount, but not _entirely_ unreasonable for a 90,000 SF palace.
posted by pjaust at 12:41 PM on July 16, 2010 [1 favorite]


A "family" home with 13 bedrooms? Is this a subtle hint to the Mafia that here would be a private place for meetings?
posted by Cranberry at 12:43 PM on July 16, 2010


Well, Ellison apparently wants to be a benevolent overlord, as he is quite a philanthropist. I agree that his place as pictured does look nice, and mostly tasteful too. He does own more than that one per Wikipedia:

Ellison styled his estimated $200 million Woodside, California, estate after feudal Japanese architecture, complete with a man-made 2.3-acre (9,300 m2) lake and an extensive seismic retrofit (37°24′44.34″N 122°14′51.40″W / 37.4123167°N 122.247611°W / 37.4123167; -122.247611). In 2004 and 2005, Ellison purchased more than 12 properties in Malibu, California, worth more than $180 million. The $65 million Ellison spent on five contiguous lots on Malibu's Carbon Beach was the most costly residential transaction in United States history until Ron Perelman sold his Palm Beach, Florida compound for $70 million later that same year. In early 2010 Ellison purchased the Astor's Beechwood Mansion in Newport, Rhode Island for $10.5 million. The property was the former summer home of the prominent Astor family.
posted by bearwife at 12:43 PM on July 16, 2010


What do you know. That is roughly five miles from our house. (Note: our house is worth considerably less than $100,000,000.)
posted by Lokheed at 12:46 PM on July 16, 2010


WHY DO REALTORS DESCRIBE EVERYTHING IN ALL CAPS DO THEY THINK I AM MORE LIKELY TO BUY A PLACE WHOSE DESCRIPTION I CANNOT EAsILY READ

YES!!!!! PERHAPS THIS PROPERTY WOULD BE MORE TO YOUR LIKING??????!!!!!
posted by Combustible Edison Lighthouse at 12:50 PM on July 16, 2010 [3 favorites]


I've never figured this out.
Had I $100 million, I'd be buying a few (hundred) thousand acres somewhere very peaceful and building a slightly smaller home.

Perhaps I'm just not ostentatious enough to be rich.
posted by madajb at 12:50 PM on July 16, 2010


More evidence for the natural law of compensatory equalization: You get the money but we don't give you taste.
posted by fivesavagepalms at 12:52 PM on July 16, 2010


damn that's ugly.. the neighbors that have to stare at that mess must hate them....
posted by HuronBob at 12:53 PM on July 16, 2010


I read somewhere that Ellison's (Japanese-themed) house was built entirely without nails. True? False?
posted by bitter-girl.com at 12:55 PM on July 16, 2010


bearwife: "He does own more than that one per Wikipedia"

According to wikipedia, Steve Jobs was Ellison's wedding photographer. Holy moly.
posted by boo_radley at 1:05 PM on July 16, 2010 [1 favorite]


Jacqueline Siegel, Queen of Versailles
In a town known for making “Dreams Come True,” it should come as no surprise that just outside the Disney gates a real-life fairytale exists, complete with a castle, king and queen.

To be fair, she does apparently have a computer engineering degree and worked for IBM in a cubicle before marrying Mr. Moneybags.
posted by Bwithh at 1:09 PM on July 16, 2010


bitter-girl.com: apparently true.
posted by longdaysjourney at 1:10 PM on July 16, 2010


Look on my works, ye mighty, and despair!
posted by Epenthesis at 1:12 PM on July 16, 2010 [2 favorites]


Ellison also put in Disneyland-like tunnels for the help.

The garages, which hold a modest half-dozen cars, will also be underground, as will tunnels to allow the household staff to go unobtrusively about their duties.


"Upstairs/Downstairs" American-style.
posted by longdaysjourney at 1:14 PM on July 16, 2010 [4 favorites]


Wow, longdaysjourney. Wow.

Epenthesis -- the last time I used that quote for anything was when I was at a tradeshow last month. After tweeting it, I added the hashtag #whywedontletozymandiaswatchtheboothanymore
posted by bitter-girl.com at 1:17 PM on July 16, 2010 [1 favorite]


"Who do you think will eventually buy Versailles II?"

What the fuck is this article from, a grade 6 social studies textbook?
posted by tehloki at 1:17 PM on July 16, 2010 [6 favorites]


Slideshow of billionaire homes. I had no idea the Mars (candy bar) family lived in Northern Virginia.
posted by longdaysjourney at 1:19 PM on July 16, 2010


> YES!!!!! PERHAPS THIS PROPERTY WOULD BE MORE TO YOUR LIKING??????!!!!!:

WHAT DO YOU WANT TO DO???????????DO YOU HAVE THE GUTS TO DEAL WITH THIS????

THIS $999,000, 4BR, 4BR/2BA MULTI-FAMILY HAS BEEN RENOVATED BY NINJAS. ARE YOU A BAD ENOUGH DUDE TO RESCUE THIS PROPERTY?
posted by The Card Cheat at 1:25 PM on July 16, 2010 [6 favorites]


> I had no idea the Mars (candy bar) family lived in Northern Virginia.

The Mars family is fucking crazy.
posted by The Card Cheat at 1:27 PM on July 16, 2010 [3 favorites]


Legendary was the Xanadu where Kubla Khan decreed his stately pleasure dome...
posted by archagon at 1:28 PM on July 16, 2010


Hey some sympathy here, these folks are enduring tough times:

"We have five nannies right now. They each have their own assignments, with one specifically for the twins. One of the nannies is considered the driver and takes the kids to school, lessons and friends' houses. We also have a housekeeper. We used to have more, but my husband thought we should cut back because of the bad economy and the layoffs he had to make at his company. He thought we should suffer too. We even have our kids doing chores now. They take out the garbage and stuff like that. We explained that the whole country is going through a hard time right now and they have to pitch in. They understand."
posted by octothorpe at 1:30 PM on July 16, 2010 [3 favorites]


Man, sometimes the universe just gives you like the biggest , most obvious symbol ever.
posted by The Whelk at 1:38 PM on July 16, 2010


The Mars family is fucking crazy.

Great article, thanks. That article makes Mars Corp sound like a pretty egalitarian place to work.

Status at Mars is a dirty word. No one has an office, everyone makes his own photocopies, everyone handles his own telephone calls and nobody flies first class.

Bureaucracy is anathema. Writing memos is against corporate policy and everyone, including the family, works on a first-name basis. Meetings take place only 'as needed'.

Wages are tied directly to the company's performance. If sales explode, associates can earn bonuses of up to five, 10, even 15 weeks' salary. But if sales shrink, so does income.


Alas, they are anti-gay, anti-estate tax Republicans.
posted by longdaysjourney at 1:49 PM on July 16, 2010 [1 favorite]


Legendary was the Xanadu where Kubla Khan decreed his stately pleasure dome...

Where Alf, the sacred program, ran,
for reasons inexplicable to Man,
on two hundred flatscreen TVs.
posted by fleacircus at 1:53 PM on July 16, 2010 [6 favorites]


as will tunnels to allow the household staff to go unobtrusively about their duties.

When I'm rich, I want my own morlocks, too...
posted by mikelieman at 1:55 PM on July 16, 2010


I asked her how she wound up with a home that is almost twice as large as the White House: “We had planned maybe a 12,000 square-foot home, but our family grew, we have eight kids, and during the design process the house just kind of took on a life of its own.”
My parents had seven kids, and our house probably wasn't larger (in total square feet) than their indoor pool or spa or whatever the hell it is.
posted by Halloween Jack at 1:58 PM on July 16, 2010 [1 favorite]


“We had planned maybe a 12,000 square-foot home, but our family grew, we have eight kids, and during the design process the house just kind of took on a life of its own.”

"And, you know, we had to appease the vengeance-filled ghosts of the dead, so why not?"
posted by fairytale of los angeles at 2:29 PM on July 16, 2010


> “We had planned maybe a 12,000 square-foot home, but our family grew, we have eight kids, and during the design process the house just kind of took on a life of its own.”
Ladies and gentlemen, I give you.... Rose Red!
posted by Decimask at 2:44 PM on July 16, 2010


A kitchen and 10 satellite kitchens. I like to imagine they are in the air, above the place in geostationary orbit.

There are 3 spas behind the the waterfall, 1 in the fitness centre, and 1 jacuzzi in each of the 23 full bathrooms, in case you feel like going into a hot tub but don't want to walk half an hour through all the rooms.

Best of all, there's a movie theatre in the children's wing, and also an adult movie theatre, for all your porn-viewing needs.
posted by jeather at 2:45 PM on July 16, 2010 [1 favorite]


Here's what I don't get.

(okay I don't get a lot of things about this, this is just one thing.)

Large houses like these, estates, historically fell into one or more of these categories in terms of use.

1) You're Very Important and your Entire Family lives with you, even your most extended outer family. They have apartments and suites and room for guests. Your unmarried children live there until they get married (or move their married in) As the local Authority in the area, you would hold court - literally preside over the matters of your jurisdiction, charge criminals, etc. If your role is big enough, you need extra spaces for other government officials, bureaucrats, etc. (and if this is true your Estate may be more or less open to the public, either on certain occasions or year-round - so you need room to fulfill your obligation to the communities and to impress the fuck out of visitors)


2) Your estate is the center of the village you're in. You own a lot of land and lease it out (or however) and collect a tax on the land or a % of the goods produced. Orchards, plantations, sheep, you name it. You may also run a factory or shipyard in town, and require the offices in your estate to deal with them

3) People are trying to kill you, so you build a big-ass fortification and Keep. Them Out while all your food is grown within the palace walls. It's a home and a fortress, with an active military presence.

Now, unless I am wrong about Flordia, none of these uses are common in American homes or domestic/hospitality practices - not even among the very rich. it's so ...fake. Like Edwardians pretending to be Regency dandies or something. It's so removed from purpose or reality, it's not even some glittering treasure trove you'll bestow to the State after you die or something- it's just there a big hunk of confused design elements and stuff that used to serve a clear and exact purpose just randomly stapled together - and unlike say The Hearst Castle - it's not even *good* stuff. It''s a cartoon set.
posted by The Whelk at 2:57 PM on July 16, 2010 [3 favorites]


$100 mil really does seem like a lot. A 432-unit luxury apartment/condo building here in DC just flipped for $162m, so yeah. It's absurdly expensive.

Also, if you're spending 100 million dollars on your house, wouldn't you want it built out of something a tad more durable than wood? Stupid Americans wouldn't know elegance if it smacked them in the face...
posted by schmod at 3:01 PM on July 16, 2010


I mean, seriously it has the roof line and profile of a strip-mall bank or a Versailles-theme diner.
posted by The Whelk at 3:02 PM on July 16, 2010 [2 favorites]


Since we're bashing the family for living such a ridiculous ostentatious, gauche lifestyle, perhaps these two comments from the article octothorpe links to is also worth reading:
Ms. Kassab needs a reality check, as do the people who believe words taken out of context and are so judgemental. This article did not show the truths and essence of this family and what they have donated to this community.
For example Jaqueline is being judged by the success of her husband. As a mother who raised my own children I can’t even comprhend the schedule she keeps trying to give each and everyone of their children and husband the love and attention required to raise loving, successful, contributing members of society. Little does anyone know she does not only do pesonal charity volunteering but also works on several committies and agencies that help thousands of needy people of this community.
David Siegel is a self made man who has created 10,000 direct jobs and 20,000 indirect jobs in this community and has given millions of his own dollars to charities as well as helping individuals. Because he and his wife have chosen to have and raise 8 children is their business. Those 8 children are loved, involved in sports, go to public school and are very much like every other children who have wants and needs. Jacqueline is up everyday at the crack of dawn figuring out schedules, school activities, sports games, YMCA schedules, dentists, doctor appts, etc. Yes, she does have help, but she also works fulltime in addition to all of the above. She is President of Travel Host Orlando Magazine, which helps draw money into the community and is the Executive Director of the Mrs. Floria America Pagaent.
Give me a break, I have no idea how the Siegels can be such a giving influence in the community and be expected to put so much love into their own family without help.
Would everyone be happier if she closed down her two businesses and layed off her employees, laided off the 5 nannies at home and quit giving an important amount of her time and energy to help others in the community.
I believe Mr. Siegel and his wife can spend their personal money how they want, and care for the love and safety of their children, expecially when they continue to give and donate so much money, time and create employment in this community.
Yes, POOR Jacqueline, for trying to be a wonderful mother and spend hours helping people in her community. OBVIOUSLY, her REWARD has been one of UNKIND JUDGEMENT AND MISUNDERSTANDING.
Also:
There are always two sides to a story. In life, there are workers and watchers. For some reason, some people choose not to take risks, are not willing to do the hard work, or for what ever reason they fail to achieve in life what they are capable of doing. Rather than using their energy, minds, and gifts to better themselves, they waste their energy tearing down and criticizing others who have been successful. This is so sad but not new. Jealousy and envy have existed since man was created and will exist until God calls us home. If only instead we could be happy for people when they have blessings and even be inspired to do more ourselves.
I know David and Jackie Siegel. Our home was destroyed. When they heard about it, they provided my family with a place to live until we could get another home. No one knew… there were no stories in the newspapers. This was done because they saw a need and had a way to help. Later, I became very ill. My husband is a realtor in this down market and had no income for over a year. When the Christmas season arrived, we wondered if we would need to tell our grandson there was no Santa as there was no money for Christmas. The Siegel’s found out and sent us a check to not only provide Santa for my grandson, but also money to cover my medications. No one knew… again there were no newspaper articles. The market is even worse this year. My husband has faithfully continued to work, but has had no closings and we had used all of our savings. At Thanksgiving, we knew the table would be sparse. We hear about families who are suffering in this economy, but it is different when you are living it day by day. Many friends were praying for us and we greatly appreciated every prayer. Their prayers were answered when on the day before Thanksgiving we received a call to confirm we were at home. Then a van arrived and a sweet man from Westgate brought in a huge box and basket of food… turkey, dressing, cranberry sauce, rolls, sweet potatoes, pumpkin pie, vegetables, flour, canned food, etc. It was a feast and there was a note of encouragement from the Siegel’s along with a food card from Publix. That card fed my family for the next two months. I cried for hours. No one knew and again there was no press. Like many others during this economic season, we have even sold personal treasures on eBay and finally had a huge rummage sale. Jackie and David gathered friends and family and drove an hour to support us. They bought some things I knew they didn’t really need… they just wanted to help. And that rummage sale provided an income to pay our bills that month.
We are just one family. I know hundreds of families who have been quietly helped by David and Jackie Siegel. They give over $2,000,000 to approximately 100 charities each year. The Siegel’s have one rule… the money must go to house, feed, or clothe someone. They spent many Thanksgiving Days serving food at the homeless center in Orlando. I once asked David why they didn’t allow the press to know all of the things they do. He shrugged his shoulders and said, “I know and God knows… and that’s all that counts.” I come from a middle class family and we were taught the importance of honesty and hard work. I have always been so happy when others manage to achieve and improve their lot in life. For instance, it has always been fun to watch some of our country music stars. People like Dolly Parton and others who came from dire poverty yet achieved success. Perhaps they like big hair and star studded clothes. That is great if it is what makes them happy. They worked hard and are using their blessings to help others. David Siegel was selling newspapers on the sidewalk at age four… he has worked hard and achieved success in business. I smile and said, you go guy! If David and Jackie want to build a big house, hire a staff to help with their children, or whatever, that is great if it is what makes their hearts happy. They dared to dream, worked hard, earned it, and now help others… and in the majority of those cases, there is no publicity.
Wouldn’t it be wonderful if we could be happy for those who have been blessed and help others. I thank God for people like the Siegel’s. They are very wealthy and had nothing to gain by helping us. But they did and it gave us hope on some very dark days. They have helped so many people you do not even know about. Hopefully we can all pass it along and help others when we have opportunities. Or shall we shoot arrows?

posted by zarq at 3:04 PM on July 16, 2010


Why is that people who long to be American royalty and build themselves palaces have such atrocious taste?

Well, the problem isn't that they have bad taste, the problem is that they don't realize they have bad taste and don't buy a decent architect and interior designer. Plus, you don't get to the top of the shitpile by putting beauty and art over having the most goddamn bathrooms in the state.

It depends on the rich person. Larry Ellison, for example, has pretty good taste (except for those awful dining room and piano room chairs).

and the fuzzy lounge furniture in fake pickled oak stained pseudo-feudal japanese living room. Plus, you can't help see the analogy "corporate chieftain" == "feudal lord." Is he that self-aware? On the other hand, I can now imagine a very special recreation of the Kurosawa movie Ran starring Larry Ellison, once the shit really his the fan in this country.
posted by ennui.bz at 3:06 PM on July 16, 2010


Tom Ripley: It's a new piano. Probably shouldn't--
- Probably shouldn't--

Freddie: Did this place come furnished?
It doesn't Look like Dickie's, uh--
It's really horrible, isn't it?
It's so, uh, bourgeois.
In fact, the only thing that looks like Dickie... is you.
posted by The Whelk at 3:12 PM on July 16, 2010


In the map view, those houses a stone's throw from the front porch; are they part of the property, or are the neighbors seriously that close?

zarq: Since we're bashing the family for living such a ridiculous ostentatious, gauche lifestyle, perhaps these two comments from the article octothorpe links to is also worth reading:

They could be fantastic, amazing, wonderful human beings, but they still have shitty taste.
posted by paisley henosis at 3:16 PM on July 16, 2010 [1 favorite]


They could be fantastic, amazing, wonderful human beings, but they still have shitty taste.

Yes, they do.

But that's not all they're being attacked for, is it?
posted by zarq at 3:28 PM on July 16, 2010


I'd buy it, except it's in Florida. No thanks. Colorado. Virginia. Connecticut. California. Washington. But Florida?! Euwwwwww.
posted by Secret Life of Gravy at 3:33 PM on July 16, 2010


the fuzzy lounge furniture

At least those look comfortable, if not fashionable. Those chairs, not so much.
posted by longdaysjourney at 4:09 PM on July 16, 2010



But that's not all they're being attacked for, is it?


No, it isn't. They're also being attacked for building a ridiculous fucking barn that is literally meant to be a palace. Bill Fucking Gates' house isn't that big, and he has given waaaaaay more to charity than they have; I'm not sure if Steve Jobs' house would qualify as their guest house. The difference is, those two can afford their houses.
posted by Halloween Jack at 4:22 PM on July 16, 2010 [1 favorite]


“I wanted a bowling alley for the kids and I wanted an indoor roller- and ice-skating rink, and my husband wanted a 10,000 square-foot health spa with an indoor relaxation pool and the house kept growing and we had to keep buying more lots.”
Is there like a psychological term for like... body dysmorphia, but for like... houses and shit? Cuz I think they have it. And maybe... Half of America, too.
posted by symbioid at 4:41 PM on July 16, 2010 [2 favorites]


It's a lot more tolerable if you read them all in the voice of Vercua Salt.
posted by The Whelk at 4:42 PM on July 16, 2010 [1 favorite]


Having grown up just few miles up the road from this, I'm underwhelmed.

And yes, this kind of shit was no less ridiculous when the Vanderbilts did it.
posted by thivaia at 6:13 PM on July 16, 2010


Or another way, Biltmore is a grandiose copy of a country estate that was a grandiose copy of a palace that was a gradoise copy of a fortress.

So this is like a copy of a copy of a copy translated by eels and done in crayon.
posted by The Whelk at 8:16 PM on July 16, 2010 [7 favorites]


you know what's amazing? their property taxes are only $66k and change. for a house that's supposedly worth $100M, that's a pittance.
posted by liza at 8:57 PM on July 16, 2010


zarq: "David Siegel is a self made man who has created 10,000 direct jobs and 20,000 indirect jobs"

This... this is approximately 1/3rd the size of IBM in the US.
posted by boo_radley at 9:38 PM on July 16, 2010


This... this is approximately 1/3rd the size of IBM in the US.

Westgate is the largest timeshare and real estate company in the US. Annual revenue is more than a billion dollars. But far lower than IBM or Microsoft.
posted by zarq at 12:49 AM on July 17, 2010


liza: Those are the taxes on the unimproved value of the land. The taxes on the finished house wouldn't be paid until it was completed and assessed. Based on the taxes paid on some nearby "smaller" properties, it would not surprise me to see taxes on the finished house exceed $500k / year.
posted by JohnYaYa at 5:18 AM on July 17, 2010


Rich people have such awful taste.

I guess you've never flipped through an issue of AD?
posted by L'OM at 8:00 AM on July 17, 2010


It comforts me to know that if the drought continues as it has been, that lovely sinkhole lake will dry up and turn into a fetid stretch of decomposing muck, with bull gators bellowing loudly in the remaining damp spots.
posted by cmyk at 1:41 PM on July 17, 2010


longdaysjourney, those "awful dining room and piano room chairs" are loosely after Charles Rennie Mackintosh (the piano room chairs are from the Willow Tea Rooms, the dining room a zig-zaggy spin on his various high-backed designs). But you're right, they look weird in Larry's place.
posted by Scram at 11:06 AM on July 18, 2010


*I KNEW IT* I was racking my head going "Wait are those Werkstate stuff? What" and then, bam Mackintosh. Of course.

Mackintosh stuff kinds ALWAYS looks odd taken out of it's context. Guy designed whole rooms, take away one bit and it doesn't work anymore (or out of context). I've seen stuff use Mackintosh designs with other work and it can gel, but it takes effort.
posted by The Whelk at 11:20 AM on July 18, 2010 [1 favorite]


longdaysjourney, those "awful dining room and piano room chairs" are loosely after Charles Rennie Mackintosh (the piano room chairs are from the Willow Tea Rooms, the dining room a zig-zaggy spin on his various high-backed designs). But you're right, they look weird in Larry's place.

It's not the "weird"-ness I'm objecting to. They just look extremely uncomfortable to sit in (as well as not really fitting in with the aesthetic of the rooms they're in (imho).
posted by longdaysjourney at 8:13 AM on July 19, 2010


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