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"A journey into the wilderness is the freest, cheapest, most nonprivileged of pleasures"
August 15, 2010 5:47 PM   Subscribe

Journey Through Canyons — a stunning HD time-lapse of the canyonlands in Arizona and Utah, featuring the Grand Canyon, Glen Canyon, Bryce Canyon, and Zion Canyon. A thorough way to explore these magnificent geologic marvels is to follow The Hayduke Trail, one of America's Best Adventures.
posted by netbros (11 comments total) 27 users marked this as a favorite

 
I haven't watched the time lapse yet - but does it show where Rudolf The Red (who knows rain, dear) caches his peanut butter?
posted by Nick Verstayne at 5:57 PM on August 15, 2010


Urge to move back to the southwest: rising.
posted by logicpunk at 6:10 PM on August 15, 2010


The trail is measured, not in miles, but in 6-packs.
posted by kenaldo at 6:38 PM on August 15, 2010 [2 favorites]


Looking at the map of the Hayduke Trail is mindblowing - 800 miles of incredibly rugged, very dry terrain. The hub sighed and said if only I was 20 years younger! I have to agree.... want more and we were just there last month!
posted by leslies at 6:42 PM on August 15, 2010


That's a very nicely-done video. The Narrows is really amazing -- we've been discussing the merits of Utah over at The Lifeboat and I've been reminiscing about my trip to Zion in the 80's. Great memories -- from nearly falling off Angels Landing to nearly drowning while inner-tubing when I didn't get out at the "TUBERS GET OUT OF THE WATER NOW!" sign, to hikes in box canyons with black & white film in my Pentax. A fine week was had.

Also, quality canyon-seeing can be done at the Black Canyon of the Gunnison in SW Colorado.
posted by Devils Rancher at 7:21 PM on August 15, 2010


Urge to move back to the southwest: rising.

At a job interview in Grand Junction, CO, a prospective employer once opted, with a bright smile, "We're thinking of paying as much as minimum wage!"

This has dampened my enthusiasm for the region.
posted by underflow at 7:53 PM on August 15, 2010 [1 favorite]


Too bad we can't do that in fighter jets like these guys.
posted by zoogleplex at 10:40 PM on August 15, 2010


The summer I worked in the kitchen of the lodge in Zion National Park, I told the ranger station and my supervisor about halfway through my stay there that I wanted to hike the narrows. It's something you can only do when there's no warning of thunderstorms within a huge radius of the park, because flash flooding will kill you.

Finally the weather report was favorable, and I got up early early to be dropped off at the trailhead, and I started hiking. 16 miles through ever-deepening slot canyons, most of the time in the water, sometimes up to chest level...

One of the most grueling, amazing, transcendent days I've ever spent. I highly recommend it for anyone able to do it and who can fit it into their schedule.

I've never heard of this trail mentioned in the FPP. I think my motivation to do that would be much higher than, say, hiking the Appalachian Trail. Well, you know... unless my tour guide is at certain southern governor...
posted by hippybear at 11:16 PM on August 15, 2010 [1 favorite]


It must have taken a great deal of restraint after heading each page with a quote from Edward Abbey and naming the trail after George Hayduke not to mention The Monkeywrench Gang even once on the Hayduke Trail website.
posted by localroger at 6:37 AM on August 16, 2010


hiking the narrows is a great day. not very difficult, just long. I twisted my ankle half way through and looked forward to every icy stream crossing so I could numb it up. southern utah is gorgeous. the slot canyons of Escalante are well worth a visit.
posted by sineater at 8:53 AM on August 16, 2010


Man, that hike looks incredible. (Need I actually comment on the video's beauty?) I wonder how well traveled it is in comparison to the AT or PCT. It will be interesting to see what they say about re-supplying, too.

That's an interesting reading of the text, localroger.
" Named after George Washington Hayduke III, a fictitious character in Edward Abbey's novel The Monkey Wrench Gang, ..."

posted by HE Amb. T. S. L. DuVal at 8:12 PM on September 1, 2010


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