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September 6, 2010 3:34 AM   Subscribe

Photographer Bill Cunningham has moved out of his a rent controlled apartment right above Carnegie Hall after living there for 60 years. He offers some pictures and memories of his time there. Andrew Carnegie intended the space above the hall to be occupied by artists and since 1896 the list of occupants has included Isadora Duncan, Marlon Brando and Leonard Bernstein. The last 5 residents (more details about them here) are being cleared out to make way for a music school.

Cunningham is known for this candid street photography which can be seen elsewhere in his "on the street blog": 4th of July, white with fedoras, gaga-wear...
posted by rongorongo (45 comments total) 16 users marked this as a favorite

 
“Life decisions are never easy,” said Clive Gillinson, the executive and artistic director of Carnegie Hall. He said the space would “be used infinitely better,” for programs involving young artists from New York and around the world.

“To have a few people find somewhere else to live — and somewhere nice to live, since we were helping them — for the benefit of tens of thousands of people, well, that was a balance that clearly went toward looking after tens of thousands of people.”


I suppose this is right, and having a school for artists is a wonderful thing, but the idea of a living/working space for artists right above Carnegie Hall is such a magical one for me, that it seems a real shame that it's gone now. One less unique thing about New York that is resulting in turning it into just another big city.
posted by xingcat at 4:45 AM on September 6, 2010 [9 favorites]


Thank you for this lovely story. New York will never be "just another big city," ever. That these studios and their inhabitants got to hang in as long as they have is a testament to Carnegie Hall. And now, they seem to have handled the inevitable, unavoidable transformation of a magical space from a magical time into something vital for today, while honoring the past. If Bill Cunningham's good with it, so am I!
posted by thinkpiece at 4:57 AM on September 6, 2010 [1 favorite]


New York will never be "just another big city," ever.

When I left NYC in 1995, it smelled like it was becoming a place where, finally, once and for all, money mattered more than anything else. Where there would soon be no place left to carve out some little corner of space for oneself as an artist, musician, poet, whatever. To live there on the economic fringes and still have something vital and rewarding around you. I felt that blowing in the wind, 15 years ago. The other night, here in Tokyo (my home since 1995) I did a gig with a guy who still lives in the East Village. An amazing tap dancer, actually, he also does other types of dance, plus some vocals, beatboxing, this and that. He's still got a rent-control apartment there, otherwise, of course, he'd have been out years ago. We spoke at some length about the NYC of 20 to 25 years ago, versus the NYC of today. And he told me what I've suspected for some years now, and what I've observed on my visits back to my old city: New York city is a pale shadow of its former self. From the Disneyfication of Times Square to the Paris Hiltonization of the East Village, New York has changed dramatically in the past 15 years. And for the worse. Certain pockets of Brooklyn notwithstanding. New York never was just another big city, but... it damn sure smells like one these days.
posted by flapjax at midnite at 5:26 AM on September 6, 2010 [13 favorites]


I just finished No Place Like Home: A Memoir in 39 Apartments by Brooke Berman, a playwright only one generation removed from me. Even as a struggling playwright/waitress, she ends up living places in the city I only dream of inhabiting. I like my neighborhood in Brooklyn a lot though and back then it was unsafe to put it charitably.
posted by melissam at 5:36 AM on September 6, 2010 [1 favorite]


but the idea of a living/working space for artists right above Carnegie Hall is such a magical one for me

For me as well, but I always envisioned it being for the starving variety. Was it really intended to be a long term place for people to live? Bill Cunningham is pretty established. Maybe a rotating residence would have been cool for people just starting out, who are well known, maybe, but not financially secure yet. I do like the idea of it being turned into part of the music school, though.
posted by bluefly at 5:38 AM on September 6, 2010 [1 favorite]


I'd prefer another Bubba Gump Shrimp Co.
posted by bardic at 5:40 AM on September 6, 2010 [2 favorites]


Man on the street: Bill Cunningham. A New Yorker profiled from last year.
posted by goofyfoot at 5:46 AM on September 6, 2010 [1 favorite]


finally, once and for all, money mattered more than anything else.

As compared to Tokyo, flapjax? Seem about even to me. I've been around NYC all my life practically -- grew up in the suburbs but spent my youth coming to the city to learn and play music, moved back to NY in my mid-30s after stints in two of America's loveliest, most livable cities. I could never leave again. I'll still hold NYC up against any big city in the world for sheer diversity of activity and people. It is bottomless.

And let's not forget the name on the marquee at Carnegie Hall. Those weren't rent-controlled tenement apartments that are now being gentrified. They were an artist colony built in what was even at the time one of the most expensive neighborhoods on the planet by a billionaire for glory, income, and tax-deductibility (if they had that in Carnegie's day). Pretty sweet deal for the inhabitants, but I don't think New York's arts communities are owed more than other constituencies for affordable housing, and there are a lot of well off artists in New York living in rent-controlled or stabilized apartments too (including a few remaining arts-colony buildings, like Wesbeth).

If you're gonna intentionally stake out a place on the margins of mainstream American culture and seek the company of others who do, New York is still a hell of a place to do it.
posted by fourcheesemac at 6:27 AM on September 6, 2010 [1 favorite]


NYC is nice, but it's no Paris.
posted by oddman at 6:28 AM on September 6, 2010


Paris, really.... Fossil of a fossil in a fossil.
posted by metsauce at 6:42 AM on September 6, 2010 [2 favorites]


flapjax at midnite, this is my favorite time of year in my neighborhood, Morningside Heights. The streets are filled with very young people -- some of them from tiny villages far away -- studying street maps, pointing, looking up to the tops of buildings, figuring out the subway, negotiating the dollar, making friends, showing their parents around as they settle in to their first year at university. You can see the absolute wonder in their eyes! I'm a lifelong New Yorker, moved away, lived abroad, came back and been to many major cities around the world, so I have some perspective. Hell, I cried when the St. Marks Bar and Grill closed. Folks have been decrying the decline, McDonaldsization/Disneyfication of New York for. ever. Things change, yes, but they begin again in other places, in other ways. There's absolutely no place like this place, and that goes way beyond "certain pockets of Brooklyn." That's dismissing a lot of neighborhoods that are still teeming with mom-and-pop shops, global flavors and sounds and modes, I mean, it's endless, really. Times Square? Who cares, it is as it ever was, a tourist zone. Oh, except for it's heyday of porn, peep and grime.
posted by thinkpiece at 6:48 AM on September 6, 2010 [4 favorites]


'Marilyn Monroe used come by to try on hats'

That's all I need to know. New York City is the greatest place on earth!
posted by MarshallPoe at 7:10 AM on September 6, 2010


finally, once and for all, money mattered more than anything else.

As compared to Tokyo, flapjax? Seem about even to me.


Rent-wise? Uh-uh. It ain't even at all. Tokyo is still a town where there are really, genuinely affordable places to live for young (or, hell, old) artists, musicians, dreamers. Sure, they're often very tiny places, and sometimes places where there's no shower: you have to go to the local sento to bathe. But they're affordable to people who need time to work on their art, their music, who can't work full time jobs unless they essentially want to give up their art or music. I know musicians who pay 500 or 600 dollars a month for places in the heart of Koenji, for example, surrounded by their friends and fellow musicians, walking distance from the venues they regularly play at. In other words, the way it used to be in the East Village. But that's looong gone there, brother, as you must know. Both the venues and the cheap pads a musician could walk back home to after the gig. NYC rents are (except for those lucky few still in rent control pads) through the roof.
posted by flapjax at midnite at 7:39 AM on September 6, 2010 [4 favorites]


Folks have been decrying the decline, McDonaldsization/Disneyfication of New York for. ever.

Yeah? I was there from 84 to 95, and I never heard anyone decrying the decline, McDonaldsization/Disneyfication of New York during those years. Cause it wasn't happening during those years. It started happening around 1995/6, and it's gotten rapidly worse in the years since.
posted by flapjax at midnite at 7:43 AM on September 6, 2010 [2 favorites]


Respectfully beg to differ. I owned restaurants in Manhattan during the years you cite and we, as just one minor example, were cited the NYPress by the Mugger as "yuppies destroying Soho by gouging tourists with a $10 burger" when we opened our place in '86. As long as there as been real estate, development, growth, uh, capitalism, it's been happening. And un-happening, as evidenced by the closing of numerous Barnes and Nobles around the city.
posted by thinkpiece at 8:06 AM on September 6, 2010


Well, the NYPress was always a petty and depressing little read. But New Yorkers pay far to much attention to what the local press writes about them, you have to admit...
posted by flapjax at midnite at 8:08 AM on September 6, 2010


Times Square? Who cares, it is as it ever was, a tourist zone. Oh, except for it's heyday of porn, peep and grime.

So your argument is, who cares about Times Square, anyway, because it never had any personality. Except for the time when it had personality, which is long, long gone. Yeah, I'd say you made flapjax's point nicely.

New York will never be "just another big city," ever.

LOOK ON MY WORKS, YE MIGHTY, AND DESPAIR!

New York is slowly becoming a one-level SimCity map. You know what that means? If you've ever played SimCity, you start off with this giant empty map with mountains, valleys, maybe a river or an ocean. And over time, you can bulldoze land or raise it up—the obvious advantage is that it's far easier and cheaper to build Big Grand Things when all the land is at the same level.

Well all those nooks and crannies of New York are slowly getting filled. All the curves are getting straightened out. There's no place left for the rats. And a city without rats, that's no city I'd ever want to live in.
posted by Civil_Disobedient at 8:36 AM on September 6, 2010 [1 favorite]


I went to a party in one of those apartments a few years ago. It took us about half an hour to find the right door on the street and negotiate the elevator and hallways of the building. The party was full of successful photographers and artists and it was one of those nights where I remembered why I moved to NY.

The neighborhoods keep changing here, but there are more artists and musicians than ever. The galleries all moved from SoHo to Chelsea and now they're strangely moving back down to the Lower East Side. The recession left the LES with an odd mix of new and abandoned unfinished buildings giving it a different edgy look.
posted by bhnyc at 8:36 AM on September 6, 2010 [1 favorite]


As a New Yorker (who has lived here for 15 years, who was born here, and who visited the city regularly in the 70s, 80s and 90s), I agree that the city is currently in a lost-much-of-its-character state. But the place is so amazingly dynamic. In five years, the character might be back -- or a new character might be here. Then, a decade after that, the character might be gone again. Then back. Then gone. It's silly to try to make predictions about such a moving target, such a chaotic system.

Also, visitors might be confused by this thread. Lost it's character? There's SO much going on! So note that this is all relative. If you want to see NYC people are talking about, the one with character, watch "The French Connection," old Scorsese movies (e.g. "Taxi Driver," "After Hours" and "King of Comedy") or, for a sweeter view, "Crossing Delancey."

Note the old people in that movie. NYC used to be a city where the old and young mingled. Now rents are too high for most older people. So, more and more, when you walk down the streets in Manhattan, you only see folks in their 20s, 30s and 40s. The old guy who ran the news stand has been replaced with a young guy. To me, this is a loss.

Rents are getting so high, it's impossible for the infrastructure people -- the people who really keep the city running -- to actually live in the city. They are moving further and further outside it. At some point, they are going to say "fuck it" and move somewhere else, somewhere they don't have an hour commute twice a day. Or something else is going to happen. Some sort of collapse and rebirth. But I don't see how the current state can continue.
posted by grumblebee at 9:39 AM on September 6, 2010 [2 favorites]


I know musicians who pay 500 or 600 dollars a month for places in the heart of Koenji, for example, surrounded by their friends and fellow musicians, walking distance from the venues they regularly play at. In other words, the way it used to be in the East Village.

Living in Koenji is more like living out in Brooklyn or LIC, than the East Village. It's the outskirts of the main part of the city, so I wouldn't make that comparison.

I've lived in both cities for about the same length of time. And I'll admit that, after moving to New York from Tokyo, I thought, "What's the big deal? It's just another big city." Neighborhoods are split up in the same way that they would be anywhere else, major chains are pushing out mom and pop shops, and real estate is always a problem. But it's got a diversity that no place in Japan will ever have any time soon. And because of major cultural differences, New Yorkers are more open to talking to each other, interacting in open, friendly (and not so friendly) ways. It's hard to feel alone in a city like that. In Tokyo, unless everyone's drunk, you're often operating in your own little bubble. There's something to be said for feeling like you're all in this together. In New York, you're less likely to be given special treatment just for being a foreigner, because, well, it's not special.

That's not to say that Tokyo doesn't have it's major pluses. I miss it like crazy. But I wouldn't pit one city against the other, because they're different in wonderful ways. I will say, however, that the Tokyo train systems will kick the MTA's ass any day of the week.
posted by zerbinetta at 9:41 AM on September 6, 2010 [1 favorite]


Ugh. For the record, I know "it's" and "its" are different words.
posted by zerbinetta at 9:44 AM on September 6, 2010 [1 favorite]


One less unique thing about New York that is resulting in turning it into just another big city.

Yes, because every other big city has a music school above Carnegie Hall. It is a bummer that something so unique is being replaced with something new. But it's not making it like other cities. It's just making it less like a snapshot of New York in the past. One of New York's major characteristics is change, I think.

New York never was just another big city, but... it damn sure smells like one these days.

New York's smell may have changed a bit in the last few decades, but it still seems to have a little more garbage and stale urine in the air than most other American cities and a lot less diesel exhaust, brake dust, and fuel-rich moped exhaust in the air than most European cities.

I've always been a bit annoyed by the expression that various things are "only in New York," because it seems to me that what's unique about New York isn't that it has something that exists nowhere else, but that it has everything that exists everywhere else, all in one place (hence the smell).
posted by The World Famous at 10:04 AM on September 6, 2010


Having lived in San Francisco for much of the last decade, I can totally relate to the frustration of watching your city's diversity and bohemianism eroded by gentrification.

But regarding New York - from what I understand, the astronomical cost of housing that folks are describing mostly occurs in Manhattan and parts of Brooklyn. What about the rest of Brooklyn, Queens, the Bronx, Staten Island? I know folks who successfully live "as artists" (dancers by vocation, cheap rent, hand-built second bedroom lofts, weirdly re-adapted industrial buildings) in those parts of the city.

Why do the boroughs often not get recognized as parts of New York? My best understanding is that they are not seats of power or money, so they get ignored. But aren't those neighborhoods usually the ones that get colonized by artists looking for cheap rent? Isn't today's Red Hook yesterday's East Village?
posted by marlys at 10:05 AM on September 6, 2010 [3 favorites]


I enjoyed this little photo essay a lot, thanks for posting. Two things that struck me about it were how impressive it is to have lived in such a bohemian space for 60 years and not moved on and secondly Cunningham's attitude at the end. While it's clear he will miss the space, instead of complaining about the change he seems excited about the prospect of new generations of artists coming in and roaming the halls. I respect that a lot. He acknowledges his luck (60 years in a great place), his good fortune at getting another rent controlled apartment and acknowledges that in making this change he's opening opportunities for a whole new generation of artists. That's a pretty amazing attitude when losing your home of 60 years.

Also kudos to Carnegie Hall for taking care of the tenants like this.
posted by cptspalding at 11:40 AM on September 6, 2010 [1 favorite]


And un-happening, as evidenced by the closing of numerous Barnes and Nobles around the city.

If a corporation like B+N can't afford the NYC rents, how are the bohemians supposed to manage?
posted by Blazecock Pileon at 12:39 PM on September 6, 2010


grumblebee wrote: "If you want to see NYC people are talking about, the one with character, watch "The French Connection," old Scorsese movies (e.g. "Taxi Driver," "After Hours" and "King of Comedy") or, for a sweeter view, "Crossing Delancey." "

NYC looks absolutely stunning in "The Equalizer," a mid-80s TV show shot on film that someone had the good sense to do an HD transfer. Being pre-cleanup, everything looks dingy, but in an awesome way.
posted by wierdo at 1:31 PM on September 6, 2010


from what I understand, the astronomical cost of housing that folks are describing mostly occurs in Manhattan and parts of Brooklyn. What about the rest of Brooklyn, Queens, the Bronx, Staten Island?

Something you need to consider is the distances involved. Everything looks manageable when you're at zoom-level 5. But that's just it: the city and all its boroughs are huge. To get from Houston Street (Manhattan) to Murray Hill (Queens) is about an hour. Twice a day.
posted by Civil_Disobedient at 2:56 PM on September 6, 2010


This is why if I was a bamillionaire I'd want any money and whatnot to be spent down within a couple of years of my death. Mission drift is a bad thing.
posted by shinybaum at 3:36 PM on September 6, 2010


Something you need to consider is the distances involved. Everything looks manageable when you're at zoom-level 5. But that's just it: the city and all its boroughs are huge. To get from Houston Street (Manhattan) to Murray Hill (Queens) is about an hour. Twice a day.

It would take me about an hour twice a day to get from my apartment in Allston (a neighborhood of Boston) to my job in downtown Boston. And that was over less than 5 miles.

An hour commute one way in a city isn't a big deal.

My commute now is 90 minutes one way because we moved but Baby Zizzle goes to the same daycare. It's a little more of a deal, but it's not a big one.
posted by zizzle at 3:44 PM on September 6, 2010


everything looks dingy, but in an awesome way

Yeah, they make medieval Europe look attractive too. I was a kid who came to the New York of the late 70s and early 80s all the time. Dingy is beautiful on film. In real life, it's dingy.
posted by fourcheesemac at 4:03 PM on September 6, 2010 [1 favorite]


Living in Koenji is more like living out in Brooklyn or LIC, than the East Village. It's the outskirts of the main part of the city, so I wouldn't make that comparison.

That is simply not true. Tokyo is not set up like you're indicating, neither geographically nor in the minds of its inhabitants. There is no "main", ultimately desirable part of the city. Unless maybe you're, um, the Emperor, living in the Imperial Garden. Tokyo is a cluster (a huge cluster) of distinct neighborhoods, and especially when it comes to places like Koenji, there is absolutely no imperative, as far as its residents are concerened, to be anywhere else in the city that they'd think of as more "main". There is no "main" in Tokyo. Or, put another way, there are lots of "mains" of Tokyo: Shinjuku, Shibuya, Ikebukuro, Ueno, the Tokyo Station area... and many others.

Furthermore, Koenji, having its main station (JR Koenji-eki) on the Chuo line, is very, very convenient. It is in no way like living "out" in Brooklyn or LIC. It takes exactly 7 minutes to get to Shinjuku from Koenji. 19 minutes to Shibuya. And the train service throughout Tokyo is uniformly excellent. No one who lives in Tokyo (who knows what they're talking about anyway) would ever call Koenji the "outskirts" of Tokyo.

One more point, to (sorry) put the last nail in the coffin of your argument. Koenji is precisely like the East Village used to be: there are still places that young musicians and artists can afford to rent, and full of so much local activity (or easily accessible nearby activity) that many such people feel little to no reason to leave the neighborhood, period. Yep, just like the East Village once was.
posted by flapjax at midnite at 4:13 PM on September 6, 2010


You're wrong, flapjax. The main part of Tokyo is contained by the Yamanote line. Koenji is an outer neighborhood in an outer ward, like any other outer neighborhood in an outer borough of New York. You may not think of it that way, but that's the way it is. Ask any real estate agent. Koenji is as "self-contained" as Williamsburg or Astoria.
posted by zerbinetta at 5:19 PM on September 6, 2010


"Hey Bill, I got that new camera body we were talking about. I'll be out running around today, want me to stop by?"

"Sure! That'd be great."

"OK. So, how do I get to your apartment?"

"Practice, practice, practice!"
posted by BitterOldPunk at 5:58 PM on September 6, 2010 [5 favorites]


You're wrong, flapjax

Um, no zerbinetta, no, I'm actually not wrong. If I were you I wouldn't base my ideas about what Tokyo is and isn't on what real estate agents with vested economic interests have to say about it, but rather on how ordinary residents of this city view the city as a whole, their own particular neighborhoods, and the relationships between the two. But hey, whatever. You disagree, fine. Speaking as a 15-year resident of this city, however, and as a musician in the community of musicians and artists here, I know what I know. And I will absolutely stand by the assertion that I made above: No one who lives in Tokyo (who knows what they're talking about anyway) [ or, apparently "any real estate agent"] would ever call Koenji the "outskirts" of Tokyo. The old "within the Yamanote line" bias is hopelessly out-of-date thinking. The neighborhoods along the Chuo line are Tokyo for many millions of people. And hey, especially when we're talking about art and musical culture. There are vast swathes of territory within the mystical magical zone (inside the Yamanote!) that are cultural dead spots: no action, nothing going on. And they're often much, much less convenient, transpo-wise (which is everything, really) than the neighborhoods along the Chuo line. Let's keep in mind that "Chuo" itself means "central". You probably need to update your thinking on this Tokyo geography/demographics stuff. Or, you can listen to real estate agents. Do you find yourself talking about these matters with Tokyo real estate agents with some frequency, one wonders?

Koenji is as "self-contained" as Williamsburg or Astoria.

That statement is not in any way at odds with the point I was making, and in fact, is part and parcel with the point I was making. It is indeed self-contained: culturally speaking, especially so. Like the East Village once was. But it is not nearly as inconvenient, transportation-wise, as the areas you compare it to, that is, Williamsburg or Astoria. And it is a damn sight easier to find a cheap place to live in Koenji than in those neighborhoods as well. Find me a place for 500 or 600 dollars a month in Williamsburg or Astoria, OK? My own little apartment. If they're around, hey, I've got some young musician friends who'd like to rent them!

I notice from your profile you are a resident of NYC? Is this correct? Maybe you lived in or visited Tokyo some years back and are remembering impressions you had from that time? Or maybe you're just getting some not-quite-accurate impressions or information second hand from whatever sources? Anyway, I find it odd that you are arguing your point from what is seemingly a point of, well, non-informedness.
posted by flapjax at midnite at 6:07 PM on September 6, 2010


fourcheesemac wrote: "Yeah, they make medieval Europe look attractive too. I was a kid who came to the New York of the late 70s and early 80s all the time. Dingy is beautiful on film. In real life, it's dingy."

Aesthetically, I like dingy. It presents something of a lived-in quality. Not like McMansions and dryvit. Of course, it can go too far and then you're just at "barely habitable."

However, the strong correlation with broken makes dingy places not so nice to live in.
posted by wierdo at 7:39 PM on September 6, 2010


New York city is a pale shadow of its former self.

People have been saying this for over 100 years. Usually the ones who get older and move on use it to justify their decision.

This place is home to 8 million people. Thousands of restaurants, music every night, shows, thriving neighborhoods, art, culture, publishing, people just trying to make it in life. There is history on every corner, not just the past but being made every day.

I love it more and more every day.
posted by infinitefloatingbrains at 7:57 PM on September 6, 2010 [3 favorites]


People have been saying this for over 100 years.

But it only became true within the last 20.
posted by flapjax at midnite at 7:59 PM on September 6, 2010 [1 favorite]


While you may cling to your nostalgic vision of the 'ideal' New York, I'm going to have to respectfully disagree. This place is so dynamic that the best New York is the one that exists tomorrow - the place everyone wants to be, works so hard to get to, puts up with so much to achieve. Bill Cunningham is leaving, but another group of young artists moves in. I spoke in front of a class of almost-graduated RIT students. Without exception they all planned to move to NYC. And the city they will experience when they get here is beyond their wildest dreams, as I'm sure it was for you once.
posted by infinitefloatingbrains at 8:21 PM on September 6, 2010


Well put! And, like Mulder on the X-Files, I want to believe! Anyway, a lovely and thoughtfully composed comment, there, infinitefloatingbrains.
posted by flapjax at midnite at 8:24 PM on September 6, 2010


No one who lives in Tokyo would ever call Koenji the "outskirts" of Tokyo

I lived there for 5 years and would most definitely call it the Outskirts. I briefly lived nearby and couldn't wait to move away.
posted by Hazy Star at 8:34 PM on September 6, 2010


I lived there for 5 years and would most definitely call it the Outskirts.

Well, heck, buddy, you just flat-out wrong! Are you a... real estate agent?

As mentioned above: 7 minutes by train from Shinjuku is not, absolutely and most indisputable NOT the "outskirts" of Tokyo. Y canou "call it" that all you want, but... it's incorrect! Haha!

At this point, though, I want to apologize for what has become a big derail of this thread. I will now bow out, and leave the discussion of what is and isn't Tokyo to anyone else who wishes to continue it.

Oh, but... Hazy Star... you joined Metafilter today and this is your big first comment. You, uh, wouldn't happen to be, like, zerbinetta's, you know, sock puppet, now wouldja? Naw, surely not!
posted by flapjax at midnite at 9:56 PM on September 6, 2010


Oh, but... Hazy Star... you joined Metafilter today and this is your big first comment. You, uh, wouldn't happen to be, like, zerbinetta's, you know, sock puppet, now wouldja?

I have no affiliation with zerbinetta.

Um, no zerbinetta, no, I'm actually not wrong.

I read this and was moved by your arrogance to actually sign up! I found your remarks on Tokyo to be totally inaccurate and wanted to add another 2 cents.

We do agree though that this is an awesome post and quite an interesting discussion on the merits of New York. That and I want to give Bill Cunningham a big hug!
posted by Hazy Star at 5:58 AM on September 7, 2010


I'd like to thank Goofyfoot for posting the New Yorker profile link. Now I know where to hang out in order to get into the On The Street Feature. (note to self: lose 50 lbs in two months and buy a pair of wacky shoes.)
posted by vespabelle at 8:52 AM on September 7, 2010


New York used to be a shit-hole. Now it's more of a well-maintained pay toilet.

The circle of life!

posted by Sys Rq at 11:15 PM on September 7, 2010


Check your MeMail, flapjax. No, I don't have a sockpuppet.
posted by zerbinetta at 12:37 AM on September 28, 2010


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