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BBCX365
October 5, 2010 8:17 AM   Subscribe

Johnny Selman: "I will design a poster a day for 365 days in reaction to a headline on the BBC news website and update this website everyday with the poster and the accompanying news story."
posted by OmieWise (37 comments total) 11 users marked this as a favorite

 
I once attempted a "I will do X every day for a year" sort of website. He's only a few weeks into his project. I wish him endurance, inspiration, and success.
posted by crunchland at 8:32 AM on October 5, 2010 [2 favorites]


Guy likes his halftone.
posted by solmyjuice at 8:37 AM on October 5, 2010 [6 favorites]


He's definitely got a style.

It would be cool if he partnered up with a news commentary blog and illustrated posts analyzing the stories.
posted by keratacon at 8:46 AM on October 5, 2010


I like the posters. The style is consistent on purpose, according to the genesis page -- 10 colors, no gradients, one font, no photographs. So halftone is pretty much what's left.

I strongly recommend not clicking About The Project, though, if you're not a fan of Fight Club-esque grandiosity. (It kind of reads like satire, actually, in which case he got me. And in fairness, his posters did set ablaze my dormant mind.)
posted by jhc at 8:46 AM on October 5, 2010 [1 favorite]


cool
posted by clavdivs at 8:51 AM on October 5, 2010


There are lots of places where you can see a different poster every day of the year.. and by that I mean the cover of any newspaper. These "daily" blogs are getting so fucking tiresome, WHO CARES! p.s. I'm starting a blog called crapaday.wordpress.org where I'll take a crap and write about it.. M. Night Sham-wow showed interest..
posted by ReeMonster at 8:51 AM on October 5, 2010 [3 favorites]


I'd like to see what pretty much any of these poster ideas looked like if he had a few more days to work on it.
posted by hermitosis at 8:53 AM on October 5, 2010


Check out the crepo marking plan on http://bbcx365.com/about/
posted by bdc34 at 8:58 AM on October 5, 2010


jhc: "I strongly recommend not clicking About The Project, though, if you're not a fan of Fight Club-esque grandiosity."

Metafilter: The arsonist that will wake you the fuck up.
posted by l33tpolicywonk at 9:04 AM on October 5, 2010


What means it, "crepo"?
posted by Mister_A at 9:05 AM on October 5, 2010


I strongly recommend not clicking About The Project, though, if you're not a fan of Fight Club-esque grandiosity.

I wouldn't have even thought of reading it until you mentioned it.

"I am the arsonist that" ??? I'm not prescriptivist, but no. You sound stupid.

These "daily" blogs are getting so fucking tiresome, WHO CARES!

In reality, he's just angling for a job, like a lot of folks. His work isn't bad. The problem is that it's trivial. At best it's illustration for "New York Times Magazine" style articles.
posted by mrgrimm at 9:07 AM on October 5, 2010


I'm not sure I really need him as an "infomediary" between me and the BBC's site. Or perhaps I just don't see being WOKEN THE FUCK UP for the true value add that it is.
posted by rhymer at 9:10 AM on October 5, 2010


I better make sure I paid the Fire Truck bill afore this cat sets my jawn on fire, yo.
posted by Mister_A at 9:11 AM on October 5, 2010 [1 favorite]


hmmm.. I walk my dog every day of the year. I empty the litter box every day. I go to work nearly every day of the year. I take photographs every day of the year. I read Metafilter every day of the year..

I'll start posting about it, on my "every day of the year" blog....
posted by HuronBob at 9:14 AM on October 5, 2010


Good for him to aspire to something and to strive to be creative every day. However, I feel great proclamations like this are annoying, and I let out a deep sigh every time someone gets "airtime" for something so meaningless in the grand scheme
posted by zombieApoc at 9:15 AM on October 5, 2010


The purpose of this project is to promote the awareness of global current events with the American public. ”American citizens know little about current events in general and even less about overseas events” according to The Washington Post in 2006. The article further explains that the reasons for the “unwillingness of American citizens to live up to their civic responsibilities” are due to the supply and content of our news.

When I was in high school, I competed pretty regularly in this speech event called extemporaneous speaking, in which you're given 30 minutes to prepare a 5-7 minute speech which called for analysis on some topic in domestic or international affairs using only the contents of a giant plastic tub filled with files on (in the case of our international tub) pretty much every country in the world. To prepare for this event, I would print reams of paper every week from the Times and the IHT and the Economist that were mostly either bland reframings of AP copy or the kind of trite realpolitik analysis that makes its reader feel sophisticated. And the event basically rewarded this behavior: the guy with the most citations usually won, any source over three months old was suspect, etc.

It took me a while after I stopped this daily routine of reading select elite newspapers (the ones in English, at least) every day to realize it wasn't teaching me much of anything about how the world worked, just what happened. We live in a culture which often confuses breadth for depth, which assumes reading headlines constitutes literacy with global affairs, and which treats ideologies which try to rationally order and understand that information as automatically suspect rather than worthy of serious debate (just think of how dirty the word "ideological" has become). The problem with Americans isn't that they don't read headlines - if that's all that intelligence requires, the BBC isn't all that superior to Yahoo News. The problem with Americans (and most of the rest of the western world) is they don't care to do much else.
posted by l33tpolicywonk at 9:16 AM on October 5, 2010 [2 favorites]


I thought the about pages and other accompanying bombastic text was a joke until I looked at his art again and realized it probably wasn't.

He does have a style though. It's "too serious Threadless t-shirt"-esque.
posted by MCMikeNamara at 9:17 AM on October 5, 2010 [1 favorite]


Next of Kim. Priceless
posted by leotrotsky at 9:28 AM on October 5, 2010 [2 favorites]


His posters look like those "Serbian movie posters" links that pop up on a semi-annual basis.
posted by Turkey Glue at 9:35 AM on October 5, 2010 [1 favorite]


I do so wish we'd shift to quality over quantity.
posted by tula at 9:49 AM on October 5, 2010 [1 favorite]


These aren't posters. They are illustrations which use the tropes of posters.

The point of a poster is to persuade or impel someone to do something, whether it's to protest a war, commemorate an event, speak out, buy a product, support a candidate, or change a habit. The project would be much more compelling if the designer understood this, and used his posters to convey an opinion, rather than just declarative information out of context.
posted by ocherdraco at 10:52 AM on October 5, 2010 [1 favorite]


M. Night Sham-wow showed interest

I'm getting really bored of people making these asinine comments. We get it. It's an "exotic" name that is difficult to pronounce. You don't need to add to the list of shitty comments all saying the same thing -- "M. Night Shamamalamadingdong haha get it its a funny sounding name lol twist!"
posted by spiderskull at 11:06 AM on October 5, 2010 [3 favorites]


See also: "The Daily Mail Song"
posted by daniel_ at 11:20 AM on October 5, 2010 [1 favorite]


Hits the general topic in a recognizable way, much like the stock photo or graphic that accompanies stores on tv news in the corner of the screen, but doesn't do much to tie it to the updated story, which is what he purports to do.
posted by Durn Bronzefist at 11:56 AM on October 5, 2010


Empty design is empty.
posted by doctor_negative at 12:25 PM on October 5, 2010


For anyone who cares, more information on the posters in my previous comment:
1. "End Bad Breath," Seymour Chwast, 1967. Offset lithograph from woodcut, 37 x 24".
     Protesting the Vietnam War.
2. "Olympiska spelen 1912," Olle Hjortzberg, 1910-11. Chromolithograph, 29 x 42".
     Commemorated the 1912 Olympics in Stockholm. Originally printed in 16 languages.
3. "SILENCE = DEATH," Silence = Death Project (Avram Finklestein, Oliver Smith, Chris Lione, et al.), 1986. Offset lithography, 29 x 24".
     Drew parallels between the Nazi period and the AIDS crisis, declaring that "silence about the oppression and annihilation of gay people, then and now, must be broken as a matter of our survival."
4. "Chiquita bananen," Sandmeier Ag/Young & Rubicam (Karin Hohenadel-Weiss / Karl-Heinz Daniel), 1968-1969. Offset lithograph (?), size unknown.
     Promoted the introduction of Chiquita brand bananas (replacing Fyffe brand bananas) in Switzerland.
5. "Hello everybody! MACDONALD Calling!" Labour Party, 1923. Lithograph (?), size unknown.
     Campaign poster for the (successful) election of the first Labour Government in Britain.
6. "No Need to Ask a P’liceman!" John Hassall, 1908. Lithograph, 21 x 23.6".
     The first graphic poster commission for London Underground, encouraging passengers to use the first combined map of the Underground, published that year by the Underground Electric Railways Company of London (UERL) in conjunction with four other underground railway companies.

posted by ocherdraco at 12:37 PM on October 5, 2010


...but they won't all be good."
posted by Liquidwolf at 12:47 PM on October 5, 2010


Wow, tough crowd for what I posted as an interesting project, rather than a prediction of the coming savior of graphic design.

The point of a poster is to persuade or impel someone to do something...

Those are some kinds of posters, and a fine set of links you put together, but those aren't the only kinds of posters, and these posters are no less posters just because you wish they had a different attitude.
posted by OmieWise at 1:04 PM on October 5, 2010 [1 favorite]


Please tell me every single day is the exact same poster.
posted by FatherDagon at 1:08 PM on October 5, 2010


Metafilter really does have it's own trademark brand of hipster cynicism. Do you people have some kind of aversion to creative experimentation? We get it. You're too cool to enjoy something. But I'm willing to bet at the end of his year the posters get better and better. This is wax-on/wax-off type stuff – intended to show process, not sublime enlightenment. Now go get your box of crayons!
posted by quadog at 2:03 PM on October 5, 2010


Metafilter really does have it's own trademark brand of hipster emo indie punk biker hacker steampunk juggalo cynicism.

...

"Oh no, not another freelancer!"

I'm willing to bet at the end of his year the posters get better and better.

You're on. $20? What's the judging criteria?
posted by mrgrimm at 2:17 PM on October 5, 2010


The point of a poster is to persuade or impel someone to do something..

So all those posters of celebrities, athletes, cartoon characters, cars, landscapes, skylines, etc.... those aren't posters? I mean unless you say the impel you to look at them or something but then that would apply here too....

Or is this another one of those "that's not art, THIS is art" kind of things?
posted by wildcrdj at 3:34 PM on October 5, 2010


I would say they're prints, not posters. I'm not saying one is better than the other.

The landscapes and skylines I'll give you (unless, of course, they're tourism posters), but celebrities, athletes, cartoon characters, and cars all fit into my criteria: while someone might buy a poster with those things on it just because they like it, the reason the poster exists in the first place is because it's advertising.
posted by ocherdraco at 8:07 PM on October 5, 2010


Some of those are rather witty, some do make statements of opinion. I especially liked this one about Mexican drug cartels intimidating the press.
posted by Jimmy Havok at 8:17 PM on October 5, 2010


Some of you are too cynical. I liked several of them, not least the "Next of Kim" one. Seems to me that many that post to AskMe with problems regarding inspiration, drive and direction could do well to attempt an "X-a-day" blog. Creativity flourishes under constraints. So what if some of you find it trite?
posted by Harald74 at 12:39 AM on October 6, 2010


Some of you are too cynical. --- I agree. I mean, maybe his mistake is that he's publishing them. Not every one is going to be fantastic. More than half of the point of doing this sort of thing every single day is that he's doing it every single day. And he's only just started. A dull sword isn't sharp after the first swipe of the stone. Give him an effing break already.
posted by crunchland at 4:00 AM on October 6, 2010


Creativity flourishes under constraints. So what if some of you find it trite?

I don't necessarily find it trite. I find it mostly superfluous.

I mean, good on him for trying to improve his portfolio, and I do hope he finishes all 365 (if he really cares about it), but all he's really doing is what designers around the world are doing at work every day.

I'm down with generative devices. I think oulipo is keen, and Gil Sorrentino is a hero of mine.

I guess the "angle" of turning BBC headlines into graphics isn't enough for me. The artwork is fine. But fine != engaging.
posted by mrgrimm at 1:11 PM on October 6, 2010 [1 favorite]


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