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November 11, 2010 5:34 AM   Subscribe

35 hours of video are uploaded every minute to YouTube. (SLYTBP)
posted by allkindsoftime (39 comments total) 3 users marked this as a favorite

 
No wonder I'm falling behind.
posted by Daddy-O at 5:35 AM on November 11, 2010 [1 favorite]


But what will happen when it runs out?
posted by Ahab at 5:41 AM on November 11, 2010


That means for ever internet user on the planet, there's around 6 milliseconds of uploaded video for every second that goes by.
posted by Salvor Hardin at 5:42 AM on November 11, 2010 [1 favorite]


35 hours of video are uploaded every minute

... and most of it then gets posted to the blue ...
posted by woodblock100 at 5:43 AM on November 11, 2010 [3 favorites]


This would explain their "any video getting a single flag is immediately yanked off the air" policy.
posted by Marisa Stole the Precious Thing at 5:50 AM on November 11, 2010 [1 favorite]


At first I thought 'wait a minute, does this mean that there's more time on the internet than there is actual time in reality?'

Then I thought 'well, duh.' and went for a second cup of coffee.
posted by kuujjuarapik at 5:56 AM on November 11, 2010 [1 favorite]


I remember reading an article at some point about information filtering software, it was written in earlier net days and estimated that 54MB of data was added to newsgroups each day!

I imagine that these days a fairly normal internet user easily downloads that amount each day.
posted by bjrn at 5:57 AM on November 11, 2010


This would explain their "any video getting a single flag is immediately yanked off the air" policy.

Even crazier, they actually scan every video for copyrighted material as it is uploaded. There is a TED talk about it.
posted by smackfu at 5:59 AM on November 11, 2010 [1 favorite]


One day, YouTube will eat your babies.
posted by bwg at 6:08 AM on November 11, 2010


Great Scott! was General Winfield Scott, who weighed 300 pounds.
posted by TheophileEscargot at 6:11 AM on November 11, 2010 [5 favorites]


It has a long way to go to catch the 500,000 feet of shit pooped out by humans every minute.
posted by weapons-grade pandemonium at 6:16 AM on November 11, 2010 [5 favorites]


YT long ago passed "all of broadcast TV history" and I assume they are now past "all of cable TV history". I wonder when they'll also be past "all videotapes and DVDs ever sold" (although obvs that's a lot of redundant content...but then so is a lot of YT).
posted by DU at 6:17 AM on November 11, 2010


By my calculations (and Sturgeon's Law), that is 756 hours of crap per day.
posted by Wolfdog at 6:27 AM on November 11, 2010 [1 favorite]


weapons-grade pandemonium: "It has a long way to go to catch the 500,000 feet of shit pooped out by humans every minute."

Either way, it's a lot of crap.

well dammmit everyone's already gone there with the feces analogy never mind
posted by jquinby at 6:30 AM on November 11, 2010


Actually, sorry that was way wrong. 45,360 hours per day.
posted by Wolfdog at 6:30 AM on November 11, 2010 [3 favorites]


Yet it seems like all the interesting stuff is being uploaded to Vimeo.
posted by naju at 7:12 AM on November 11, 2010 [1 favorite]


What is better about Vimeo nowadays?
posted by smackfu at 7:43 AM on November 11, 2010


What is better about Vimeo nowadays?

A friend of mine at ffmpeg has a laundry list of complaints about YouTube, most of them about audio and video encoding. And I haven't yet gotten one of those "Oops wrong country lol!" messages from Vimeo, although they may very well have them. Still, everyone goes to YouTube for their videos, so I guess it stays popular because everyone's already there.
posted by Marisa Stole the Precious Thing at 7:51 AM on November 11, 2010 [1 favorite]


I don't know the technical details, maybe someone else can answer that. To my untrained senses it seems like far superior audio quality, higher quality HD. And it's nurtured a more artistic, professional community over the years. YouTube has the populist vote, also it has the adorable videos of pomeranians. I'm not knocking either. But if there's something independent that's being produced with a higher level of care, better equipment, more attention to sonic richness, it's more likely to be found on Vimeo than YouTube in my experience.
posted by naju at 7:53 AM on November 11, 2010


How many brain-dead comments are posted every minute?
posted by tommasz at 8:22 AM on November 11, 2010


Technically, Vimeo is trash. Its encoding introduces skips, pauses and lags into the video, and then its flash player compounds the problem. I have no idea why people actively pay to have their work ruined.

The best you can hope for is to download the video file with streamtransport and play it with your own player. The results still suck, but they suck about half as much.
posted by clarknova at 8:25 AM on November 11, 2010 [2 favorites]


Does that number seem low to anybody else?
posted by schmod at 8:53 AM on November 11, 2010


Technically, Vimeo is trash. Its encoding introduces skips, pauses and lags into the video, and then its flash player compounds the problem.

I have never had any of these problems with vimeo and I'm using flash on linux, which completely sucks.

About the only problem I've had with vimeo is the apparent lack of metadata which means I need to wait for the video to download/buffer before jumping ahead.
posted by madajb at 9:23 AM on November 11, 2010


I may be wrong (it's a very rough calculation) but if you recorded the entirety of an average person's lifespan, it could uploaded in just under 7 hours.
posted by JaredSeth at 9:36 AM on November 11, 2010


Damn, it could be uploaded.
posted by JaredSeth at 9:36 AM on November 11, 2010


Vimeo is much more elegant visually.

For example, its interface disappears while playing a video. Small details that matter if you care about how your video looks, so all the beautiful animations end up there.

Also, their editorial choices are better. Go to vimeo and youtube and compare the videos featured on the homepage.
posted by Tom-B at 10:02 AM on November 11, 2010


I like Vimeo, but it could use some upgrades like being able to seek anywhere in a video.
posted by wcfields at 10:54 AM on November 11, 2010 [1 favorite]


Vimeo now offers its users the choice to have their videos play using an html5 wrapper (vs flash)...I think they are slowly transitioning to this format for the whole site, re-encoding all older videos. This player enables skipping ahead, and also lets you play the video in iOS. If you see an "use html5 player" option (or some similar warning, on dial up now so I'm not going to check it out) below the video, click it...I think it saves your preference and automatically plays every compatible video in html5.

As for skips and lag introduced in compression; they have had some problems with these sorts of issues but for the most part are able to personally respond to individual requests for recompression (sometimes with personalized tweaks to the algorithm, it seems)...ideally it wouldn't happen at all but I haven't seen these issues pop up too often. What's more likely is that the issue is on the user side (graphics card, internet connection, etc.) or a server issue on Vimeo's end. They are growing rapidly, and are definitely experiencing issues with that, but on the whole I've found it a worthwhile service for the price...for me, it's worth it just to be able to watch embedded videos on an iPad.

YouTube also has some nasty compression issues; including (in my experience) really weird behavior with 'ken burns' effect panning on stills, and strange color issues (I am currently trying to fix some videos that looked fine as properly compressed quicktime files, looked great on vimeo, but somehow gained pink skintones on YouTube). And good luck getting personalized responses from the techs at YouTube.
posted by soy bean at 11:14 AM on November 11, 2010


This would explain their "any video getting a single flag is immediately yanked off the air" policy.

Well, that's not true. You might be thinking of DMCA takedown requests, where we do follow the DMCA policy. But I guarantee you giving a video a single flag will NOT result in an auto-takedown.

On the content ID system.

Vimeo now offers its users the choice to have their videos play using an html5 wrapper

YouTube HTML5 (and previously).We have very good HTML5 coverage because we do h264 and WebM for most video (h264 for all, WebM for a growing number) so it works in Firefox.

On the technical issue, encoding quality is not a binary thing. Both sites have their own encoder settings and thats going to influence how you see it based on what aspects you notice more. Also, we don't necessarily get the same mix of input sources (uploaded video quality, which I think is part of this given the community aspects some have mentioned). But take a new 1080p video with good bitrate (in other words, a clean source), upload it to both, and I think we produce superior output.

And good luck getting personalized responses from the techs at YouTube.

I actually give personal responses on MeFi (well, AskMeFi anyway) quite often, but I know thats not what you mean :) [If you do have specific technical problems, or issues with encoding in uploads of yours, etc, anyone is free to MeMail me and I'll see what I can do]
posted by wildcrdj at 11:42 AM on November 11, 2010 [4 favorites]


Here's the info on flagging

Note: "Flagged videos are not automatically taken down by the flagging system." They are in fact reviewed.

Copyright claims work differently (as described in the DMCA policy).

[All of this is just helpful info and/or personal commentary by me, I am not an official spokesperson just a dev. They don't muzzle us, however :) ]
posted by wildcrdj at 11:47 AM on November 11, 2010


Awesome, thanks for the info wildcrdj, and the very generous offer of help! There will be a some mail for you next week, unless the pink tinge was on my end.

And yeah, what you get out in terms of video quality definitely depends on what you put in, so Vimeo's apparent higher quality probably has a lot to do with that...I've seen some gorgeous 1080p stuff on YouTube. Thanks for all your work to make those 35hours/min possible!
posted by soy bean at 12:04 PM on November 11, 2010


Vimeo is much more elegant visually.

For example, its interface disappears while playing a video.


Which is one reason I hate vimeo. I like to be in charge of when my software hides information.
posted by DU at 12:55 PM on November 11, 2010 [1 favorite]


I used to like Vimeo better but youtube's player has made huge strides visually.

And if you put a CPU monitor on your machine, at least on my old box under windows XP, the youtube player is remarkably light as far as the resources it uses; Vimeo's player would peg my old box's CPU while youtube would be roughly a third.

Mind, that was playing on the youtube site. Youtube embedded videos on other sites took much more CPU cycles than the same video on their own site.
posted by maxwelton at 1:20 PM on November 11, 2010 [1 favorite]


[All of this is just helpful info and/or personal commentary by me, I am not an official spokesperson just a dev. They don't muzzle us, however :) ]

Right. My comment about flagging and things getting pulled was meant to be an exaggeration, with a nugget of truth to it. My primary reason for going on YouTube is to look at videos that were uploaded from NicoNicoDouga. On many an occasion, there doesn't seem to be any rhyme or reason to why some videos get pulled - despite linking back to Nico, giving full credits to the original artist, or even being the YouTube account of the Nico artist themselves - while others stay up.

I realize there's a lot to sort through and all, and the team's only human. Mistakes get made. Just seems a bit trigger-happy and arbitrary on occasion, that's all. I still use YouTube and intend to continue doing so. The site's made a number of improvements, and I look forward to seeing what they do next.
posted by Marisa Stole the Precious Thing at 1:38 PM on November 11, 2010


Even crazier, they actually scan every video for copyrighted material as it is uploaded. There is a TED talk about it.

Cleaning out a storage locker, I found this old VHS tape I'd made when my then-boyfriend got his tongue pierced. He was more afraid of the potential for pain than the actuality, so it took 60 minutes to do a 5 minute procedure, and the camera just kept running while we talked him through it. Thanks to facebook, I still know the body piercer, so put the video up on youtube for his edification and reminderment of his past life on the edge.

A few minutes after the first segment is up, I get an email from youtube letting me know that the Tori Amos album playing in the background is recognizable. They aren't pulling the video, just letting me know they'll be putting an auto-link-advertisement on it.
posted by nomisxid at 2:31 PM on November 11, 2010


BTW nomisxid, I noticed you broke it up into 10 minute chunks. We actually changed the time limit (for non-partners) to 15 minutes a couple months ago.
posted by wildcrdj at 2:55 PM on November 11, 2010


Wow, they mush have one HECK of a honkin' disk drive.
posted by Drasher at 3:27 PM on November 11, 2010


I may be wrong (it's a very rough calculation) but if you recorded the entirety of an average person's lifespan, it could uploaded in just under 7 hours.

Yeah, but given the amount of bandwidth most people have at their disposal, you'd have to assume that each day or two or your life would need to be uploaded from a different source at the same time. The coordination of which would make up a good portion of that video of your life.
posted by davejay at 3:46 PM on November 11, 2010


Wow, they mush have one HECK of a honkin' disk drive.

One of the most interesting parts of working here is the (to me anyway) mind-boggling scale of the whole thing. What used to be big numbers in all my other jobs look so quaint now.
posted by wildcrdj at 4:03 PM on November 11, 2010


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