Join 3,375 readers in helping fund MetaFilter (Hide)


Paws for Purple Hearts
November 13, 2010 1:29 PM   Subscribe

... it's terribly important for veterans to feel they are continuing a mission that held them together through the violence and stress of war. "PTSD carries a stigma, that you're broken and wounded," said Yount, "And many guys have guilt for not still being in the fight. The idea of Paws for Purple Hearts is you can be part of the war effort while you're getting treatment."
posted by Joe Beese (17 comments total) 2 users marked this as a favorite

 
I for one think this program is a terrible idea and also a potential tax boondoggle; I'm bothered by it's very existence and purpose, and can't believe ANYONE would support-

Oh who am I kidding? This thread is going to be a one-sided affair of "dusty" eyes and sniffles.
posted by hincandenza at 2:03 PM on November 13, 2010


I disagree hincandenza.
The tax money is already there or it could be re-directed for this cause. You get a dual benefit for your money invested. solders want/need help and the dogs need training.

it is not a one sided affair as joe will not play squad leader via web cast.

After WW2 the idea of vocaional theraphy was of concern to Dr. Crissey.
new methods that employers could use to help the vet adjust with his physical and mental health issues, a stigma at the time. His correspondence alone included many corporations from G.E., G.M and on down. The idea of cost effective practices as part of business that can be re-invested into the worker. He proved this. This subject is near to me so to say. I have the 30 page paper to prove it. Im not an atomic playboy.
posted by clavdivs at 2:28 PM on November 13, 2010 [2 favorites]


How Dogs Help Veterans Cope With PTSD
posted by sciurus at 2:31 PM on November 13, 2010


I think hincandenza was feeding the puppies hamburger.
posted by ChurchHatesTucker at 2:36 PM on November 13, 2010


A few nights ago, HBO had a program on PTSD, showing its results, and tracing it back to our many wars, beginning with the Civil War. A common thread throughout was that to admit to illness caused by stress was unmanly and a way of avoiding duty etc. Now of course we are much more aware of its nature and results, and homelessness, job loss and suicide are some of the results.

There are many approaches to try to deal with PTSD. Dogs, shown here, moving. Then there is this:
http://www.newyorker.com/reporting/2008/05/19/080519fa_fact_halpern
In addition, the use of Ecstasy, LSD and other drugs is used/being tested.

I wonder though if dogs are used, and the vet gets attached to the dog, and a few years later the dog dies a natural death, if there is not a further distress then caused by the dog's loss? Just asking.
posted by Postroad at 2:54 PM on November 13, 2010 [1 favorite]


I wonder the same thing, Postroad. It's a wonderful thing to see these guys getting relief from their love and attachment to the dogs, but having lost beloved pets myself, I know that loss in itself can also be traumatic. Hmmm...
posted by airgirl at 2:57 PM on November 13, 2010


If this program helps soldiers cope with PTSD, I'm all for it (and, I mean, really.... how can you say no to PUPPIES?). However, a lot of the summary really bothers me:

it's terribly important for veterans to feel they are continuing a mission that held them together through the violence and stress of war.

Huh? Maybe I'm misreading this, but it sounds like this guy wants Vets to maintain their wartime mentality. That's a horrible idea! The idea is to move on from the war, and gradually reacclimate back to society.


"PTSD carries a stigma, that you're broken and wounded,"

It does? Maybe I'm just sheltered, but I don't think I've ever met somebody who harbored negative feelings toward people with PTSD. As a general rule, people are somewhat uncomfortable around others with mental illnesses, simply because they're unfamiliar with it, and don't know how to interact with people who have it. I've never seen outright hostility or stigma associated with it though.
posted by schmod at 3:44 PM on November 13, 2010 [1 favorite]


Beloved pet's killing reopens old wounds for former Navy SEAL [2009]
posted by ctmf at 3:50 PM on November 13, 2010 [3 favorites]


What a wonderful program.

Dogs to the (emotional) rescue!

We all win.
posted by morganannie at 4:05 PM on November 13, 2010 [1 favorite]



Huh? Maybe I'm misreading this, but it sounds like this guy wants Vets to maintain their wartime mentality. That's a horrible idea! The idea is to move on from the war, and gradually reacclimate back to society

Actually, you are misunderstanding...there is a camraderie and a "brotherhood" that goes along with being a soldier. That cohesiveness is important -and to lose it is yet another loss. It's the idea of "continuing the mission" by being of help and service to fellow servicemen and women that they are expressing.

One reason a lot of military spouses stay here in Fayetteville instead of moving back to be with extended family during their spouse's deployment is that very idea of "military family." How much more for the soldiers themselves-not to be part of "the mission" is yet another loss and grief to them. Really.
posted by St. Alia of the Bunnies at 4:06 PM on November 13, 2010



"PTSD carries a stigma, that you're broken and wounded,"

It does? Maybe I'm just sheltered, but I don't think I've ever met somebody who harbored negative feelings toward people with PTSD. As a general rule, people are somewhat uncomfortable around others with mental illnesses, simply because they're unfamiliar with it, and don't know how to interact with people who have it. I've never seen outright hostility or stigma associated with it though.
posted by schmod at 3:44 PM on November 13 [+] [!]


Soldiers like to not think of themselves as broken, and the stigma is in their own heads -and perhaps in the heads of their buddies. It may be hard for a civilian to understand.
posted by St. Alia of the Bunnies at 4:07 PM on November 13, 2010


it's terribly important for veterans to feel they are continuing a mission that held them together through the violence and stress of war.

Huh? Maybe I'm misreading this, but it sounds like this guy wants Vets to maintain their wartime mentality. That's a horrible idea! The idea is to move on from the war, and gradually reacclimate back to society.


I think it's more about maintaining a connection to the war effort and to other vets. Wounded vets often feel that they've betrayed their comrades by being unable to return to duty; they feel like they've had to abandon everything they were fighting for. Programs like these give them something they can do to help, to be a useful part of the overall mission, without depending on a wartime mentality.
posted by vorfeed at 4:10 PM on November 13, 2010 [1 favorite]


He lost his dog that would re-open any wound in this circumstance.

It does? Maybe I'm just sheltered, but I don't think I've ever met somebody who harbored negative feelings toward people with PTSD.

STIG-MA...something outside of your experience.

JM:....."MONICA CROWLEY...are you the snow queen because...dam?"
posted by clavdivs at 4:16 PM on November 13, 2010 [1 favorite]


It does? Maybe I'm just sheltered, but I don't think I've ever met somebody who harbored negative feelings toward people with PTSD.

Maybe negative feelings isn't the way to put it, but certainly it's a very common stereotype that combat veterans are all some kind of crazy. Which is its own special kind of alienating in a society that's already kind of alienating for returning vets.
posted by lullaby at 5:36 PM on November 13, 2010 [1 favorite]


no offense schmod. the good news, my nephew (going over there soon) thought it was funny and thought your comment interesting he did ask a question.
" ask your friend (who served) how many people have they have killed then ask them how many they saved. I your friendship survives, you have spoken for why i am going."
posted by clavdivs at 6:11 PM on November 13, 2010


I'd love to learn more about this program, and see how its results develop, for the vets on both sides of the equation.

admittedly, I'm a bit gooey for service dogs of any kind. The dogs selected are bred to be smart, and gentle, good dogs in all possible ways.
posted by SaharaRose at 8:09 AM on November 14, 2010


ctmf, that link kills me. How can people be so cruel? Part of me wishes he killed all four of them, but I'm glad he didn't as it would be horrible to have him have to spend time in jail in addition to everything else he's gone through.
posted by Jess the Mess at 11:33 AM on November 14, 2010


« Older In 1977, NASA launched the Voyager 1 & 2 spacecraf...  |  The Republic of Ireland is in ... Newer »


This thread has been archived and is closed to new comments