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A living post-mortem
November 15, 2010 6:00 PM   Subscribe


 
I read this blog in the voice of Comic Book Guy.
posted by birdherder at 6:05 PM on November 15, 2010 [5 favorites]


God, remember The Simpsons? That was a great, great show. And it went out on top, like ten years ago, just like it should have.

LAH, LAH, LAH I CAN'T HEAR YOU.
posted by kbanas at 6:08 PM on November 15, 2010 [12 favorites]


Now, let's forget our troubles with a big bowl of strawberry ice-cream!

Sorry. Couldn't resist.
posted by malibustacey9999 at 6:12 PM on November 15, 2010 [1 favorite]


The golden age of The Simpsons was DEFINITELY right at the time I was a teenage stoner.
posted by snofoam at 6:15 PM on November 15, 2010 [1 favorite]


The Simpsons makes me understand why Jerry Seinfeld ended his show when he did. Can you imagine 23 seasons of Seinfeld? Now that would be scary.
posted by MattMangels at 6:16 PM on November 15, 2010 [6 favorites]


I think of it as fanfiction Simpsons. Where the good Simpsons episodes would use great movies, music and tv for inspiration to make an episode, the fanfiction Simpsons use past Simpsons episodes as a paint by number guide.
posted by stavrogin at 6:20 PM on November 15, 2010


Oh, whatever. Even the worst recent episodes of the Simpsons - and there are some really terrible ones - still yield a few solid laughs. I wouldn't be sad if it ended tomorrow...or if it had ended 5 or even 10 years ago, but it is what it is, and it's still reasonably capable.
posted by ghastlyfop at 6:21 PM on November 15, 2010 [10 favorites]


This is the second place I've seen link to this blog today, it looks like a great place to spend several hours catching up on their backlog of posts.
posted by JoeGoblin at 6:23 PM on November 15, 2010


I think of it as fanfiction Simpsons.

It's worse than that. The current Simpsons writers grew up watching The Simpsons as written by writers who grew up watching The Simpsons. It's fanfic twice removed.
posted by griphus at 6:23 PM on November 15, 2010 [6 favorites]


Oh come on. Have any of you seen the most recent Treehouse of Horror? It's amazing.

Also, no screenshots with commentary for recent episodes? Sad blog.
posted by The Biggest Dreamer at 6:24 PM on November 15, 2010 [3 favorites]


These are the what now?
posted by scratch at 6:25 PM on November 15, 2010 [2 favorites]


That compare-contrast between the vampire sequences nicely summarised where the show has gone wrong - too slow, too obvious, too much setup for not much payoff.
posted by Paragon at 6:26 PM on November 15, 2010 [1 favorite]


Also, no screenshots with commentary for recent episodes? Sad blog.

They do in fact have that, but not for the one in the FPP
posted by codacorolla at 6:28 PM on November 15, 2010


the best part of the simpsons in its heyday was that inspite of each of the main characters fulfiling their archetypal roles, each at times exhibited some inner conflict with their ideals. Now they merely follow the archetypes. F'rinstance, Homer used to often be well meaning in spite of his ineptitude and scheming nature. Now he's just an insufferable dick.
posted by triceryclops at 6:29 PM on November 15, 2010 [8 favorites]


I am astonished he can actually bear to watch recent episodes. It's like watching someone take a dead, beloved relative, staple ropes to their hands and then enact a terrible marrionette show, using the swaying corpse to spout distorted cliches of what grampaw once said.

I've since moved on to American Dad for my animated comedy satire and I'm reasonably pleased.
posted by smoke at 6:30 PM on November 15, 2010 [4 favorites]


I read this blog in the voice of Comic Book Guy.

Damn you! I hurried in here so excited to say these exact same words.

Worst. Let-down. Ever.
posted by hegemone at 6:34 PM on November 15, 2010 [1 favorite]


The current Simpsons writers grew up watching The Simpsons as written by writers who grew up watching The Simpsons.

Like Robert Cray playing a Willie Dixon tune he learned off a Led Zepplin album.
posted by timsteil at 6:34 PM on November 15, 2010 [10 favorites]


"There is no shortage of things that can be mocked: vampires that don’t drink blood, sparkle in the sun, and enjoy baseball. There are even fantastically sexy supernatural superhunks who inexplicably fall in love with a heroine that, to make her easily relatable for every member of the target demographic, has been deliberately excised of all personality. This sort of thing is a satirist’s wet dream and they don’t use any of it."

Ughhghg, no no no. That is not a satirist's wet dream. That's a bunch of low hanging fruit that got picked off the tree like a million years ago.
posted by 23skidoo at 6:37 PM on November 15, 2010 [3 favorites]


too slow, too obvious, too much setup for not much payoff.

Well, it's pretty ingrained.
posted by Gator at 6:45 PM on November 15, 2010


Ah, excellent. A blog that agrees with my views on The Simpsons. A favorite for you, sir, and several hours of productivity about to be lost for my employer!
posted by Effigy2000 at 6:46 PM on November 15, 2010


It's tired-ass "old Simpsons was better" rhetoric, but at least it's well-written.

We get it, a show that has been on for two decades isn't as good or as sharp as it was when it first came out. If you don't like it, go to Russia.
posted by HostBryan at 6:49 PM on November 15, 2010 [2 favorites]


One thing the blog points out that I'd never noticed before is how empty and dull the backgrounds are. In the older episodes they would be packed with visual puns, interesting occurences, call-backs, etc. Now everything is very plain.
posted by codacorolla at 6:49 PM on November 15, 2010 [1 favorite]


(That said, I do actually like the blog and I intend to return to read more of it.)
posted by HostBryan at 6:51 PM on November 15, 2010


Someone posted this in a thread earlier, I think - at least a transcript of it.

So funny.
posted by kbanas at 7:24 PM on November 15, 2010


This is less funny.
posted by kbanas at 7:25 PM on November 15, 2010


There's some good stuff in here, but it bugs me how he's actively rooting for the demise of the show, not for it to improve or change. Speaking as someone who hasn't watched a new episode for ~8 years, I'd gladly start again if the producers started taking some risks, and the "mercy killing or bust" attitude rubs me the wrong way.
posted by saturday_morning at 7:29 PM on November 15, 2010 [1 favorite]


At what point will complaining about new Simpsons work be so tiresome and obvious that people don't feel the need to do it anymore?

Soon, I hope.
posted by oddman at 7:29 PM on November 15, 2010 [3 favorites]


We get it, a show that has been on for two decades isn't as good or as sharp as it was when it first came out. If you don't like it, go to Russia.

Hoch Hech!
posted by bitteroldman at 7:34 PM on November 15, 2010 [2 favorites]



Pfft. This Dead Homer Society is just a knockoff of the "Jerk Ass Homer" theory we were tossing around in '96 back at the www.snpp.com.


Worst Worst Episode Ever... um...

Thing...



pfft.
posted by Bathtub Bobsled at 7:38 PM on November 15, 2010



If you don't like it, go to Russia.

Check.Mate.



pfft.
posted by Bathtub Bobsled at 7:42 PM on November 15, 2010


All I can say is Dan Castellaneta really should get more credit for being a comic genius.
posted by KokuRyu at 7:45 PM on November 15, 2010 [1 favorite]


snerk.
posted by Sebmojo at 7:46 PM on November 15, 2010


Did you get the link for this FPP from the AVClub write up of the Halloween episode?

Yeah, I did too. It's a pretty good site.
posted by paisley henosis at 7:54 PM on November 15, 2010


Did you get the link for this FPP from the AVClub write up of the Halloween episode?

Yeah, I did too. It's a pretty good site.


Not at all, I don't read the AV club. It's from a totally non-related forum post.
posted by codacorolla at 7:56 PM on November 15, 2010


Congratulations on having seen something before it's posted here? I guess that's the reaction you were looking for?
posted by codacorolla at 8:00 PM on November 15, 2010


I've since moved on to American Dad for my animated comedy satire and I'm reasonably pleased

I've moved back to M*A*S*H for a series that outlasted both its literal subject war and the allegorical contemporary war. Maybe it's a zombie series, but at least suicide is painless
posted by Fiasco da Gama at 8:03 PM on November 15, 2010 [3 favorites]


codacorolla: Congratulations on having seen something before it's posted here? I guess that's the reaction you were looking for

Wait what?

It was posted just yesterday, by a moderator, on a very popular TV weblog; that is fairly high profile. As a result of that, I spent a decent chunk of time reading it today, because of that, and I imagine I'm not the only one. I imagined you had, perhaps, done the same. Apparently not, but I wasn't trying to be a jerk, just wave at another ship passing in the night, as it were.

Nevermind, sorry for thinking maybe we read the same post at a similar time.
posted by paisley henosis at 8:05 PM on November 15, 2010


Oh, waah. The Simpsons has been on a dramatic upswing ever since the movie, which itself is the best thing they've done in years. Is it anywhere near it's peak? no, of course not, but neither is it anywhere near its nadir a few years back. It's not edgy anymore, but it's solid, funny, and if it stays where it is now, I hope that it lasts for 500 MORE episodes.
posted by John Kenneth Fisher at 8:35 PM on November 15, 2010 [5 favorites]


I used to watch Burn Notice on USA. Then it started it's formula started to show through and I stopped enjoying it.

You know what I did? I stopped watching it.

He should just try that.
posted by Bonzai at 8:44 PM on November 15, 2010 [3 favorites]


If you would just send me to an orphanage and wipe my ass, I would give a shit.
posted by I love you more when I eat paint chips at 8:57 PM on November 15, 2010


A few days ago I read some blog posts complaining about the use of Arial instead of Helvetica in a recent Simpsons episode, and I'm like "people still watch the Simpsons?"

By the way, join us on December 19, 2010 right here for Simpsons Day, the annual event where we commemorate the anniversary of the last memorable Simpsons episode, Grift of the Magi. Can you believe it's been 11 years already? We've got some great stuff planned.
posted by i_have_a_computer at 9:30 PM on November 15, 2010 [1 favorite]


Mmm . . . something I always think about when I read these (incisive) arguments about how the Simpsons sucks now is that when I was 9 or 10, I had this Simpsons called the Rain-or-Shine Fun Book, which was kind of like the Dangerous Book for Boys. It was filled with cute little crafts and instructions on how to make sun tea and the words to different double dutch rhymes and stuff. Every page was colorfully illustrated and featured Bart and Lisa and the other neighborhood kids. It was really two books in one, and there was Bart Simpson skateboarding on a mobius strip in the middle, saying, "Do the Mobius, man!" The whole tone was really sweet and kid-oriented, child friendly, even though it was the Simpsons. And that's how I think of the early Simpsons, really. The kids were really kids, and I think that was significant in terms of narration and stuff.

Watching newer episodes, you never get the feeling that they're kids, and if kids are watching, they damned better be cynical. I definitely can't imagine the characters making sun tea now.

Get off my lawn.
posted by PhoBWanKenobi at 11:02 PM on November 15, 2010 [4 favorites]


The Stiffsons is an interesting comparison of two very short animations from the old and new opening credits. Look at how Marge's hair swings around dynamically and her posture shows her emotions in the older sequence; while in the new her hair is immobile and her neck pivots robotically.
posted by TheophileEscargot at 11:18 PM on November 15, 2010 [1 favorite]


If you don't like it, go to Russia Shelbyville
posted by zippy at 1:41 AM on November 16, 2010 [4 favorites]


the last memorable Simpsons episode, Grift of the Magi

Are you saying that Saddlesore Galactica wasn't amazing?

"Ew, is that my bracelet?"
"Possessions are fleeting."

posted by ArmyOfKittens at 3:35 AM on November 16, 2010


I will continue watching the show and being occasionally mildly amused by it until the day it goes off the air, but he's right -- and he's right that there's no reason to hope it will get better. When you do 400 episodes about the same people who don't age or change, it's not surprising that every new episode retreads the plot of some other better old episode.

But I don't see this as a grudgey thing -- these articles are also elegies for the brilliance of the old Simpsons episodes, most of which I haven't seen in years and am now thinking nostalgically of.
posted by Jeanne at 4:42 AM on November 16, 2010 [1 favorite]


I don't disagree with a lot of the sentiment in the blog, but man, I can't imagine spending this much time and effort on something you clearly don't enjoy. It's got a touch of the masochist to it, to be sure.
posted by modernnomad at 5:01 AM on November 16, 2010 [2 favorites]


I am familiar with the work of Dead Homer Society.

But The Simpsons is still one of the, oh, let's say top thirty shows on tv (and if you don't have cable, I'd go top-ten).
posted by box at 5:43 AM on November 16, 2010


In one of the episodes of The Nerdist Donald Glover (Troy from Community) talks about how a spec script for The Simpsons landed him his job writing on 30 Rock. He mentioned how everyone has a Simpsons spec script kicking around somewhere.

I think that hints at something true about the Simpsons Of Today as opposed to the Simpsons Of Yesteryear - Today's Simpson writers are all on their way to other gigs, they are just passing through the show and using it to develop their craft while Yesterday's Simpson writers were already at the pinnacle.

It is also a bit depressing to realize that 100% of my student employees have always existed in a world where the Simpsons have been on TV. Hell, if Bart and Lisa had started to age with the start of the series, they would be my age right about now.

And while I still watch and enjoy the Simpsons, "Grift of the Magi" is the episode that jumped the shark for me and marked the show's turning point in my mind. Consider it the Curse Of Coleman.

posted by robocop is bleeding at 5:59 AM on November 16, 2010


...Hell, if Bart and Lisa had started to age with the start of the series, they would be my age right about now.

In fact last summer, Lisa almost got married!

From Lisa's Wedding
posted by bitteroldman at 6:17 AM on November 16, 2010 [1 favorite]


I don't have Sky, so as far as I'm concerned Children's Programme The Simpsons (as many erroneously think of it here) has only been on my TV for ten years. (And Seinfeld only started in 2003, when we could buy box sets of this apparently amazing comedy that BBC2 showed at 11.35pm unless snooker was on.)

Given the choice between them and Family Guy (and yes, I know that's like comparing Peanuts and If..., or something) I'd go with The Simpsons, all the time.
posted by mippy at 6:38 AM on November 16, 2010 [1 favorite]


Well, at least it's not a Seth McFarlane vehicle.
posted by Theta States at 7:50 AM on November 16, 2010 [1 favorite]


I cannae read this blog, it makes me sad.
posted by Mister_A at 9:45 AM on November 16, 2010


One of these links led me to rewatch the homer guarding his sugar bit.

Oh my god. A couple of my friends and I say "it's defending itself somehow!" about... anything that is obviously dangerous... on a regular basis often enough that I had totally forgotten where it came from.

And "I nipped it. In that split second when you let your guard down. And I'd do it again" is right up there with the lobster wearing a sombrero on my "favorite bits of absurdism on television ever".

Someone had damn well better get my lobster wearing a sombrero reference.
posted by flaterik at 9:59 AM on November 16, 2010


I've since moved on to American Dad for my animated comedy satire and I'm reasonably pleased.

I just shuddered in disgust so hard I dislocated something.
posted by FatherDagon at 10:21 AM on November 16, 2010 [3 favorites]


God, remember The Simpsons? That was a great, great show. And it went out on top, like ten years ago, just like it should have.

You should start a blog about it.

It's like the guy who walks past the crowded restaurant desperate to tell people waiting ... "It's not that good!"

"But it's pretty good, right?"

"Yeah, it's pretty good. But it's not that good!"

We get it.

It's not so much about rooting for the show to die as to demonstrate conclusively why anyone who still likes the show is an idiot.

I haven't watched the Simpsons since I had a kid. 8pm is bedtime, and the digital tuner change makes it impossible for me to VHS it.

Speaking of which, I suppose it's about time I ran my antenna through a computer to save stuff digitally ... time for AskMe...
posted by mrgrimm at 10:23 AM on November 16, 2010


I've since moved on to American Dad for my animated comedy satire and I'm reasonably pleased.

I just shuddered in disgust so hard I dislocated something.


Yeah, I prefer Cleveland as well.
posted by mrgrimm at 10:23 AM on November 16, 2010


It's not so much about rooting for the show to die as to demonstrate conclusively why anyone who still likes the show is an idiot.

I don't get that vibe from the linked site. (Or is that not what you meant?) It just seems like a celebration of all that was once brilliant about the show, along with constructive criticism about where it now falls short.
posted by Gator at 10:29 AM on November 16, 2010


Nobody likes Zombie Simpsons.

And yet some people must surely watch it.
posted by mrgrimm at 10:41 AM on November 16, 2010


So yeah. When I worked in the LA animation scene, one of my friends told me this story about a friend's experience working on the Simpsons. Said FOAF (Ben, I think it was) got a job on the show and got stuck on his first scene - the director kept handing it back to him, saying it just wasn't right in a way he couldn't really articulate. Too extreme, too wild. Finally, he handed in a revision of the scene. The director flipped through it.

"This is great! You nailed it! What did you finally manage to do?"

"Well, I just pretended I was drawing jaundiced, bloated corpses..."

This would have been somewhere around 2000-2005. I quit watching TV in general a little before that, so I dunno if this would have been before or after the fans decided the show sucked.
posted by egypturnash at 11:32 AM on November 16, 2010


Yeah, I prefer Cleveland as well.

I'm liking Cleveland too. They changed his character a bit from Family Guy - he seems to be less mild-mannered, more dickish. I didn't like that @ the beginning, but I'm getting used to it now.

They changed the voice actress who did Roberta Tubbs and since then, it seems that this character has fewer lines. Too bad, I liked Nia Long voicing her character.

Curious to see what they are going to do with Cleveland Junior. Originally he was a good natured pushover, Ned Flanders-like. Now it seems they want to develop a darker, more bitter side to him.
posted by bitteroldman at 12:11 PM on November 16, 2010


Now it seems they want to develop a darker, more bitter side to him.

Yeah, I actually haven't watched many, but The Curious Case of Cleveland Jr. Working at the Stool hooked me in.

Plus ... David Lynch!
posted by mrgrimm at 12:56 PM on November 16, 2010


I can't decide what's sadder, that the Simpsons are still going, or that someone is blogging about it.
posted by lumpenprole at 2:31 PM on November 16, 2010


People I get:
i) Those who never stopped watching the simpsons because they enjoy it to some degree
ii) Those who stopped watching sometime around season 18/19 when the show was at its worst because it caused them great mental anguish
iii) Those who watch less often than they used to because of the show's unpredictable quality as of late

People I will never get:
i) Those who completely hate the simpsons in its modern incarnation yet continue to watch it regularly and complain profusely about it on the internet
ii) Those who do the same as above, except without actually watching the show
posted by tehloki at 3:12 PM on November 16, 2010 [1 favorite]


I like to give such hardworking blogs like this the benefit of the doubt. They feel like they need to watch the new Simpsons because they both invested so much time in the Simpsons over the years, it'd be a loss to miss the rest. But also because they feel it's their duty to chronicle the state of modern day Simpsons for viewers like myself who have all but utterly abandoned watching the, but still care about the Simpsons because of history (for me, going back to pre-Simpsons and the Life Is Hell comics).

There may be some mean-spiritedness to the blog, but the content and insight is real. To dismiss them as something you don't understand or "comic book guy"ness or something like that is missing the point and kind of pointless by itself. (With the caveat that I haven't read all of their articles.)

I ended up reading Animation Showcase: Homer Goes to College first, from a link a few days ago. It's not perfect, but it makes some very good points about how Simpsons in its "prime" had good, meaningful, and expressive animation. If you contrast it with the Stiffsons TheophileEscargot mentions above, it's a pretty stark contrast.

So, yeah, I like this blog. I love the early Simpsons and occasionally almost don't completely hate new Simpsons episodes.
posted by skynxnex at 7:19 PM on November 16, 2010


I remember when the Simpsons basically died for me. I had long watched them on VHS tapes recorded off of the local Fox affiliate. The VHS didn't go beyond season 8, and I watched and rewatched them. A lot.

I have no idea what season or what this is from, but I remember one day seeing that there was an episode of Simpsons on TV while I was home. I was pretty excited - no cable, so good TV is a rare bird - so I watched it.

Well, sir. It was the episode... where Selma (or is it Patty? Who cares?) gets into a relationship with Grampa Simpson. There's this extended two minute + long close-up scene of the two characters just sucking on hard candy. Not funny, just boring and abiding by the kind of philosophy you see in particularly weak and boring 'Family Guy" episodes ("Let's drag this on fooorrrrrrrrrrreeeeeeeeeeevvvverrrrrr! That makes everything hilarious! Automatically!")

Anyway, I turned it off, and I learned never to watch a Simpsons episode that just happened to be on TV.

Side note: One of the only bummers of my time in Malawi is that the only Simpsons that came over the satellite: Season 18. Meh.
posted by palindromic at 8:03 PM on November 16, 2010


Well, palindromic, it was 18 seconds, and while I hesitate to defend an episode from what I consider the low point of the series, it think it wasn't intended to be a comedy sequence, and rather effectively showed what WAS intended: the awkwardness between them and the vague curiosity they had about each other.
posted by John Kenneth Fisher at 9:41 PM on November 16, 2010


There's this extended two minute + long close-up scene of the two characters just sucking on hard candy. Not funny, just boring and abiding by the kind of philosophy you see in particularly weak and boring 'Family Guy" episodes...

And yet I'd bet most Simpsons "purists" would put Season 5 and Cape Feare near the top of their lists. Doh! er ... Von mir etwas umgeschnitten! (or Bob Patiño)
posted by mrgrimm at 10:29 PM on November 16, 2010


mrgrimm: And yet I'd bet most Simpsons "purists" would put Season 5 and Cape Feare near the top of their lists. Doh!

I can only speak for me, but I was surprised, going back, to see how early on that episode was. The rake thing was stupid, and personally I've always felt it was by far the worst Bob episode of the first 10 seasons.
posted by paisley henosis at 12:39 AM on November 17, 2010


)I do know what you mean, though, it is a very well-thought-of episode)
posted by paisley henosis at 12:41 AM on November 17, 2010


I think it wasn't intended to be a comedy sequence, and rather effectively showed what WAS intended: the awkwardness between them and the vague curiosity they had about each other.

Dude. The Simpsons is supposed to be a comedy show. You know, ha-ha funny? Drama, awkwardness, etc? Unless those things are also funny, what's the point? One of the points the blog writers made was that current Simpsons spend so much time building up to a joke, and often the joke never emerges.

An intelligent and classy dude getting hit in the face repeatedly with rake handles, and showing no real physical pain or reaction (aside from identical exasperated sighs) - just mindlessly, blindly stepping, to get popped in the face? That shit is funny. Gross people being gross? Not so funny.

Repetition and such can be funny, but is not sufficient or necessary for humor. With Cape Feare, the repetition is part of something else - Bob is coming to kill Bart, so while this could be a tense moment, instead it is nakedly absurdist, with a dozen rakes scattered just so, and Bob's more or less apathetic response to being whacked in the face. (It's like the same sound he makes when he has to rub Selma's feet, so it can't be that bad... or can it?)

Now it seems like repetition, awkwardly long holds, etc are the only ways they feel capable of making with the laugh-laugh, which is similar to the Seth MacFarlane world of shows.
posted by palindromic at 8:21 AM on November 17, 2010


I didn't like the rake scene either. I did like it when Peter Griffin fell and skinned his knee (at least the first time). Or the first chicken fight. Or the first "Bird." (Brian, no!)

I loved Itchy & Scratchy: The Movie, though.
posted by mrgrimm at 8:28 AM on November 17, 2010


Dude. The Simpsons is supposed to be a comedy show. You know, ha-ha funny? Drama, awkwardness, etc? Unless those things are also funny, what's the point? One of the points the blog writers made was that current Simpsons spend so much time building up to a joke, and often the joke never emerges.

Seriously? You're upset that they took 18 seconds out of the episode to explore some emotional aspects of the characters without it just being a quick punchline?

I'd hate to hear what you think about Lisa realizing she has to choose her family in "Lisa's Wedding", or Homer changing the "don.t forget you're here forever" sign above his desk with careful placement of pictures of Maggie to say "Do it for her.". Or the entire "Lisa's Substitute" episode, or Homer watching Marge's video about leaving him when he discovers she taped over their wedding video to make it, and it cuts to them dancing to "Close to You"

The reason The Simpsons in it's prime was so much better than dreck like Family Guy is because it was willing to pause the comedy for the occasional 18 seconds to try to make you feel something. Again, I am well aware that five years ago when this episode was made was THE low point of the series, and that neither that moment nor that episode was particularly well executed overall, but to criticize them for one of the few moments in that season where they went for something real, just because it was 18 seconds without a joke... Well it just boggles my mind.
posted by John Kenneth Fisher at 11:41 AM on November 17, 2010


These blogger guys are awesome.
posted by Bwithh at 2:40 PM on November 17, 2010


I don;t like Silent Bob episodes. Or Treehouse of Horror. Or the ones where for some reason the family decamp to another country.

I do like it when I find myself wanting to give that Lisa Simpson a hug because she reminds me of me and her and Homer just made me feel all sad.
posted by mippy at 3:00 PM on November 17, 2010 [3 favorites]


Exactly.
posted by John Kenneth Fisher at 3:04 PM on November 17, 2010


mippy: I'm exactly the opposite. Lately I've been getting "too much character development fatigue", wherein I get sick of them trying to explore the characters' personalities deeply, mainly because they've already worked over every aspect of that damn family and nearly every ancillary character many times already, so you just end up getting episodes with a slightly different plot but the same basic emotional storyline. See: the most recent episode, wherein Lisa goes to expensive private school for the nth time (and a repetition of the "oh no, how are we going to pay for this! but it's worth it because she's soo smart!" thing), with a side helping of marge is unfulfilled and has squandered her potential for success for the nth time.
posted by tehloki at 9:45 PM on November 18, 2010


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