Poor Xenon. So noble, yet so alone.
November 16, 2010 4:57 PM   Subscribe

Chemical Party (SLYT)

Brought to you by Marie Curie Actions, an effort by the European Commission to make science attractive to young people.
posted by hanoixan (25 comments total) 20 users marked this as a favorite

 
Okay, that was alright until the look on Potassium's face when he saw Water. Then it became pure Au.
posted by griphus at 5:01 PM on November 16, 2010 [3 favorites]


Pretty much anything with Mark E Smith involved is going to be Au-en.
posted by i_cola at 5:06 PM on November 16, 2010 [1 favorite]


He He He.
posted by weapons-grade pandemonium at 5:07 PM on November 16, 2010 [5 favorites]


Xenon forms a variety of fluoride compounds, as well as the truly bizarre cation tetraxenonogold.
posted by oonh at 5:07 PM on November 16, 2010


Aww, I was looking forward to seeing what would happen between Water and Lead. I really thought those crazy kids could make it work somehow. But no, Water had to see Potassium across a crowded rooooooom...
posted by Gator at 5:07 PM on November 16, 2010 [1 favorite]


New or old, it was fun to watch. Thanks, OP.
posted by auto-correct at 5:18 PM on November 16, 2010


Xenon can react, you just have to use some very hardcore chemistry. One of my profs does a lot of work with it and uses a lot of Xe compounds he has made as examples in our spectroscopy class.

I still think that Xe should NOT form polymers and I can feel chemistry laughing at me when I see the structure.
posted by Canageek at 5:25 PM on November 16, 2010


Def not FPP-worthy IMO.

Yeah, probably not. Sorry

Don't apologize; that was awesome!
posted by Cat Pie Hurts at 5:28 PM on November 16, 2010


(Plus it's kind of a dick move to drop into a thread just to say that you thought it was a poor FPP. Is it so hard to FIAMO?)

Three minutes of awesome, by the way. Thanks for posting it. I loved the fact that it basically depicted heterosexual, homosexual and polyamorous hookups (between the actors, obviously it's irrelevant to chemicals) and didn't make a big deal out of it at all. You rarely see that done.
posted by Scientist at 5:57 PM on November 16, 2010 [10 favorites]


I LOVE this. And I want blue jello now.
posted by Splunge at 6:01 PM on November 16, 2010


OK, I have questions:
  1. Why is Carbon black?
  2. What kind of jerk is Electricity, gratuitously breaking up a perfectly nice compound/couple like that?
  3. Why didn't the girl that broke up O2 turn into the fat H2O guy who was fighting Potassium instead of running off with one O?
  4. Why is Carbon the only black person?
  5. Why, when H2O clearly has the weight advantage, is Potassium slamming his head into the Jello and wiping the table with him?
  6. Why is there Jell-o at this party? Is this the 1950s? Or are these people Mormons?
  7. Why is the molecule with the most mojo represented by a black person?
  8. Is anybody really so in a hurry to be part of a fivesome that turns out to be methane?
  9. Water and lead? What do they see in each other?
  10. I kindof thought Xenon would be more... I don't know... dignified looking. Classy. Patrician, even.

posted by weston at 6:12 PM on November 16, 2010 [1 favorite]


Xenon can react, you just have to use some very hardcore chemistry.

I hope there's a safeword involved.
hardcore chemistry sounds HOT
posted by Cat Pie Hurts at 6:22 PM on November 16, 2010 [3 favorites]


Why is Carbon black?

Carbon black.

Why didn't the girl that broke up O2 turn into the fat H2O guy who was fighting Potassium instead of running off with one O?

She was H rather than H2, so I assume they formed a hydroxide ion.

Why, when H2O clearly has the weight advantage, is Potassium slamming his head into the Jello and wiping the table with him?

Potassium and water.
posted by griphus at 6:22 PM on November 16, 2010


What kind of solution were they in? Was it truly electrically neutral? It had to be. Or other reactions would have happened already. If it was air, why wasn't H20 on the ground, being absorbed by the carpet? Unless the carpet was carbon nanofiber tubes. If they are single molecules then we would not actually be able to see their structure. There would be a blur. How did they put those signs on the molecules? With electron tunneling microscopes?

I have got to get a life. A little nano-life. Even smaller than the one I have now.

Wait I have no life. Zero life.

I think we're dividing by zero h h h hh h h e e eeeeeee r r r rrrr eee eeeek! kkkkkk

BANG!

posted by Splunge at 6:42 PM on November 16, 2010


When I was in Chemistry in 10th grade and we were learning all this stuff I kept imagining the interactions as people to the point where I really couldn't see them the "normal" way any more (I guess as "abstract things that particles do down there in invisible land"). My friends (well, the one girl who sat with me at lunch) thought I was out of my mind for seeing it that way at all.
So anyway I really enjoyed this.
posted by amethysts at 7:17 PM on November 16, 2010 [1 favorite]


What kind of solution were they in? Was it truly electrically neutral? It had to be. Or other reactions would have happened already. If it was air, why wasn't H20 on the ground, being absorbed by the carpet?

Maybe it was really cold in the room.
posted by Thoughtcrime at 7:26 PM on November 16, 2010


Hard n Phirm do some awesome geeky music videos. The YT link for my favorite one is behind a sign-in wall now, but is at the top of the first link. This is a live version. This is a song about pi, which makes me think about what would have happened if I had started to take psychedelics when they first put me in advanced math in grade school.
posted by vortex genie 2 at 7:30 PM on November 16, 2010 [1 favorite]


I think we need more educational content with soundtracks by the Fall. Although I'm not sure why they didn't use Noel's Chemical Effluence.
posted by deadbilly at 8:04 PM on November 16, 2010


This was awesome, thanks.

I think this comment will combine with Uncle Grumpy's comment and form common table salt.
posted by maxwelton at 9:06 PM on November 16, 2010 [1 favorite]


FUCK YEs!
posted by Eideteker at 9:48 PM on November 16, 2010 [1 favorite]


That was terrific, thanks! I thought it was a good FPP--funny and informative. Great to see the EU promoting interest in science--there ought to be more of that in other places.

Before I watched it I thought the soundtrack might be something by the Chemical Brothers.
posted by hurdy gurdy girl at 11:20 PM on November 16, 2010


2. What kind of jerk is Electricity, gratuitously breaking up a perfectly nice compound/couple like that?
posted by weston at 6:12 PM on November 16 [+] [!]


Actually, electrolysis of sodium chloride solution produces (amongst other things) lye, which is used in many different ways. As Tyler would happily inform us, it is the crucial ingredient in soap making. And Snoop's favorite method of disposing of bodies wouldn't have been possible without it.
posted by Cheminatrix at 3:18 AM on November 17, 2010 [1 favorite]


In 8th grade my freinds and I started using the word sodium(Na) to describe women we saw with a nice ass. As in, "Check out that sodium over there man.....", or "dude! sodium!"
Yes on reflection the usage reflects upon our overall awkwardness.
posted by humanfont at 5:05 AM on November 17, 2010


[A couple comments removed. Flag it and move on, "this isn't FPP-worthy" isn't by itself comment-worthy.]
posted by cortex at 6:12 AM on November 17, 2010


This is awesome!
posted by P.o.B. at 3:05 PM on November 17, 2010


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