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November 24, 2010 6:32 PM   Subscribe

Tom Delay has been found guilty of money laundering and conspiracy to commit money laundering. He faces five years to life in prison on the former, and 2 to 20 on the latter.
posted by p3on (102 comments total) 7 users marked this as a favorite

 
woops, DeLay*
posted by p3on at 6:32 PM on November 24, 2010


/Points finger.

Ah, haha. Hahahahahahaha.

Damn. That felt good.
posted by Ghidorah at 6:33 PM on November 24, 2010 [14 favorites]


I've been dreading this inevitable Metafilter thread since I saw this on the news earlier tonight.
posted by SkylitDrawl at 6:34 PM on November 24, 2010


You say Delay, I say DeLay, let's call the whole thing off.

(Where certain values of "off" include prison time)
posted by digitalprimate at 6:34 PM on November 24, 2010 [2 favorites]


Five bucks says DeLay's lawyers will argue on appeal the jury stopped deliberating early so they could go home for Thanksgiving.
posted by l33tpolicywonk at 6:35 PM on November 24, 2010 [6 favorites]


This happened across the street from where I live.
posted by djduckie at 6:35 PM on November 24, 2010 [1 favorite]


*spits tea*

By "prison" you do mean the big building with razor wire fencing and bars and such, right? I just want to be sure before I gather wood for the celebratory bonfire.
posted by Marisa Stole the Precious Thing at 6:36 PM on November 24, 2010 [3 favorites]


WAIT!
WAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAIT!
there is actual justice in the US of A?!??!
who knew!
posted by liza at 6:38 PM on November 24, 2010 [3 favorites]


I hope he has a strong wristbands, to protect from the inevitable slap.
posted by pompomtom at 6:39 PM on November 24, 2010 [8 favorites]


I read that the judge may choose probation. So...will it be life or probation?
posted by SkylitDrawl at 6:41 PM on November 24, 2010 [1 favorite]


Casting a grim shadow on the future of his dancing career...
posted by kaibutsu at 6:41 PM on November 24, 2010 [7 favorites]


"The criminalization of politics undermines our very system."

I believe the correct response to this is, "You started it with the Clinton impeachment trial," and, "neener, neener."
posted by BuddhaInABucket at 6:42 PM on November 24, 2010 [8 favorites]


Somehow Obama is to blame.
posted by Kraftmatic Adjustable Cheese at 6:42 PM on November 24, 2010


He will get probation and no fine. Then he will write his memoirs and hit the lecture circuit.
So yea, justice, but not as we know it Jim.
posted by Old'n'Busted at 6:43 PM on November 24, 2010 [6 favorites]


Sheeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeit.
posted by hutta at 6:44 PM on November 24, 2010 [17 favorites]


Couldn't have happened to a nicer guy.
posted by infinitywaltz at 6:44 PM on November 24, 2010


To answer your question, SkylitDrawl: what color is Tom DeLay, exactly?

There, you have your answer.
posted by bitter-girl.com at 6:45 PM on November 24, 2010 [1 favorite]


To quote my associate, a Mr. N. Muntz, "Ha-ha."
posted by ancguy at 6:46 PM on November 24, 2010 [3 favorites]


There once was a dude nicknamed hammer
A notorious political scammer
A lumbering ass
Found laundering cash
And (hopefully) thrown in the slammer
posted by googly at 6:47 PM on November 24, 2010 [9 favorites]


I was in the jury selection pool for a Dick DeGuerin (DeLay's defense attorney) trial a few years ago. The man is smooooth...

(The defense did fuck up pretty hard in this one, though.)
posted by Cyrano at 6:47 PM on November 24, 2010


Could someone explain to this Canadian what (D-TX) means? Is it democrat-Texas? I don't get it.
posted by YamwotIam at 6:47 PM on November 24, 2010


Boy that took a while.
posted by dougzilla at 6:48 PM on November 24, 2010


Before we go deeper into the speculations, can an actual lawyer weigh in here? Does his being found guilty of these two charges include the possibility of probation? Or do minimum sentences in this case mean minimum sentences?
posted by Marisa Stole the Precious Thing at 6:49 PM on November 24, 2010


I don't see what the big deal is, the money that was "donated" went into one account, the money for local Texas races came from another account. It's not the same money sheeple!
posted by nomadicink at 6:49 PM on November 24, 2010


Could someone explain to this Canadian what (D-TX) means? Is it democrat-Texas? I don't get it.

Fox News is infamous for captioning disgraced republicans as democrats, just a joke
posted by p3on at 6:49 PM on November 24, 2010 [1 favorite]


Thanks, p3on.
posted by YamwotIam at 6:51 PM on November 24, 2010


Don't worry. President Obama will no doubt pardon him in the interests of bipartisanship.




Kidding, kidding. Put the pitchforks down.
posted by zarq at 6:51 PM on November 24, 2010 [6 favorites]


I want him to have a short sentence. Life in general pop ought to do that.
posted by Lentrohamsanin at 6:53 PM on November 24, 2010 [3 favorites]


All the articles I've read have stated that probation is definitely an option.
posted by SkylitDrawl at 6:53 PM on November 24, 2010


Great; let's get rid of all the corrupt mofos ... Republicans and Democrats!
posted by ZenMasterThis at 6:56 PM on November 24, 2010


Ooops, sorry. What I meant was: Yay for our team!!!!11!!
posted by ZenMasterThis at 6:57 PM on November 24, 2010 [1 favorite]


He's gonna get probation, I'm sure. Judge has discretion for anything from probation to life. Ridiculous.
posted by Joseph Gurl at 6:59 PM on November 24, 2010


This is why we need mandatory minimums.
posted by ecurtz at 7:05 PM on November 24, 2010 [4 favorites]


There once was a chap named DeLay
not frightened to enter the fray
He was quite the pisser
with money coming out his kisser
Lord I wish they send him away.
posted by edgeways at 7:10 PM on November 24, 2010


We have something like three campaign finance laws in Texas, and DeLay was too damned arrogant to obey them. This is a state in which we got an ethics commission only after a factory chicken farmer handed out $10K checks on the floor of the state Senate. That wasn't illegal in 1989. And that's the level of campaign finance enforcement and DeLay still couldn't play inside the rules.

Thank you, Ronnie Earle, for bringing this case and thank you, Rosemary Lehmberg, for prosecuting it. Even if he gets probation, it's satisfying after all the shit he's pulled to finally see the Hammer get nailed.
posted by immlass at 7:12 PM on November 24, 2010 [16 favorites]


This is just a liberal plot to discredit a hard-working American who wants to wrest our country back from the hands of the socialist Muslim-In-Chief who threatens to destroy it.

So, friend, in summary, the Texas Republican Freedom Committee could really use your help. A donation of $5, $10, $15, or $20 could go a long way toward making sure that your voice is heard in Congress. Personal checks accepted. Fill in credit card information below. Thanks for your support! You're a Real American!
posted by BitterOldPunk at 7:16 PM on November 24, 2010 [3 favorites]


The sad part about all this is that while he can be prosecuted for this offense, the practice of corporate donations to politicians is becoming more and more prevalent every day. Here we are 7 years after the law was broken, with the redistricting damage of that election already done, with campaign finance in a new and frightening permutation, and the best you can do is say 'neeer neeer?'

The amount of personal insults in here is bordering on absurd. He broke the law, it ruined his political career, shamed him in front of his peers, and justice is served, for once. So you resort to schoolyard insults.

Seriously, stop.
posted by infinitefloatingbrains at 7:22 PM on November 24, 2010


Let's bring back caning.
posted by toodleydoodley at 7:23 PM on November 24, 2010 [2 favorites]


I'll believe it when he spends a night in jail.
posted by stoneweaver at 7:24 PM on November 24, 2010 [2 favorites]


...and justice is served, for once.

Justice hasn't arrived quite yet. If you think that a ruined career and shame in front of equally corrupt peers is bad enough for what he did, well...
posted by griphus at 7:30 PM on November 24, 2010


MetaFilter: the best we can do is say 'neeer neeer'
posted by TheFlamingoKing at 7:31 PM on November 24, 2010 [2 favorites]


Oh my!
posted by Splunge at 7:33 PM on November 24, 2010


Dear Tom DeLay:

I never believed in torture until your party convinced me otherwise. Here's hoping you get waterboarded in the name of justice.
posted by TrialByMedia at 7:36 PM on November 24, 2010


"He faces between 5 and 99 years in prison, though the judge may choose probation."
posted by vidur at 7:37 PM on November 24, 2010


So if he gets probation, does he still have a felony to his name, or does he walk from that, too?
posted by Blazecock Pileon at 7:37 PM on November 24, 2010


The amount of personal insults in here is bordering on absurd. He broke the law, it ruined his political career, shamed him in front of his peers, and justice is served, for once. So you resort to schoolyard insults.

Don't sweat it. Dude will get a slap on the wrist followed by gigs as a Fox news consultant and a professorship at Liberty University.

He'll be totally rehabilitated.
posted by Pogo_Fuzzybutt at 7:37 PM on November 24, 2010


griphus: Justice hasn't arrived quite yet. If you think that a ruined career and shame in front of equally corrupt peers is bad enough for what he did, well...

Has he developed the ability to feel shame yet?
posted by at by at 7:38 PM on November 24, 2010 [4 favorites]


Good! Fuck 'im!
posted by notsnot at 7:39 PM on November 24, 2010


Does this mean he wont return to Dancing with the Stars?
posted by munchingzombie at 7:40 PM on November 24, 2010


guys, you're hurting the hammer's feelings.
posted by TrialByMedia at 7:40 PM on November 24, 2010


Blazecock: yes.
posted by hamida2242 at 7:40 PM on November 24, 2010


He broke the law, it ruined his political career, shamed him in front of his peers, and justice is served, for once.

I don't think the last three items on your list are set in stone, just yet.
posted by Blazecock Pileon at 7:40 PM on November 24, 2010 [2 favorites]


hamida2242: "Blazecock: yes"

Yes on the felony, or yes on it being bumped down or removed?
posted by Blazecock Pileon at 7:41 PM on November 24, 2010


So when do they waterboard him to find out what else he's lying about?
posted by Splunge at 7:43 PM on November 24, 2010


As we say here in Hong Kong: DeLay no more.

An English homonym that brings to mind a profane Cantonese phrase:
Fuck your mother
posted by bwg at 7:43 PM on November 24, 2010 [3 favorites]


Karma is a bitch.
posted by Tashtego at 7:47 PM on November 24, 2010


"As we say here in Hong Kong: DeLay no more.

An English homonym that brings to mind a profane Cantonese phrase:
Fuck your mother"

Mm, isn't that what Jackie Chan was videotaped saying on stage at that Jonathan Lee concert?
posted by jfwlucy at 8:00 PM on November 24, 2010


infinitefloatingbrains: "The amount of personal insults in here is bordering on absurd. He broke the law, it ruined his political career, shamed him in front of his peers, and justice is served, for once. So you resort to schoolyard insults."

Actually I see a lot of gleeful jokes about sentencing but not a lot of personal insults. And you know, the guy is an elected representative who spit on his office and constituants and is now officially a convicted felon; I'm pretty sure I'm according him all the respect he deserves.
posted by DarlingBri at 8:03 PM on November 24, 2010 [6 favorites]


Oh man, please please please Baby Allah send him to the slammer.
posted by bardic at 8:06 PM on November 24, 2010 [1 favorite]


I'm pretty sure once you're convicted of a felony charge, that's it, regardless of sentencing. You're a convicted felon even if the judge gives you time served or probation or whatever. IANAL.
posted by axiom at 8:07 PM on November 24, 2010


blazecock: yes on the felony, axiom beat me to it. the record of conviction separate.
posted by hamida2242 at 8:23 PM on November 24, 2010


Hopefully, the real karma/justoce factor here is that this man will never serve in office again, and the man he set out to destroy (Lloyd Doggett, formerly D-TX 10CD, now D-TX 25CD) still serves, and serves well.

How's that Permanent Republican Majority workin' out fer ya, Mr. Rove? And all y'all pea-brained "pundits" who had to scramble after 2008 to change your worldviews to accomodate the new "Tea Party" reality, now that that's where the money's comin' from?

38th-and-a-half and Guadalupe is where Rove and his henchmen cut Austin (long represented by J. J. "Jake" Pickell) into four parts, Congressional-district-wise, in an effort to wipe out one of the few blue islands in that red, red, state.

Lloyd fought back, and fought back hard, modifying his staff, and adjusting to the fact that his new district was a "bacon strip," stretching all the way from 1/4 of Austin to the Rio Grande (a seven-hour drive). He hired bilingual staffers, he trained, he ran, he traveled. He got to know his new constituents, and he won.

When you are fighting an opponent who will stop at nothing, you need to come back hard, but clean.

No, "neener, neener" is not the correct response. Even if the guy walks - even if the guy is billed in a "Dream Pairing, Champagne Dreams and Caviar Wishes" dance team with Bristol and becomes engaged to Sarah after Todd suddenly elopes with Miley Cyrus in the Runaway Bride Scandal that Dominates News Cycle After News Cycle as the Media Look On, Seemingly Helpless Before the Demands of The Rapt Public, all the while knowing that This News Has Got To Be Good For Sarah, and Let's Get Some Sound Bytes from a SarahPACMom and ...what was his name again? Oh, yeah, put them on DeLay's show, and book 'em for Limbaugh while you're at it before the book tour starts (has that writer even started that draft yet? we have deadlines, people!)....

The Correct Response is Lloyd Doggett's response. Don't Mourn. Organize.
posted by hankercranker at 8:38 PM on November 24, 2010 [9 favorites]


FPP:

Under Texas law, corporate money cannot go directly to political campaigns.

but:

Earlier this year...

Overruling two important precedents about the First Amendment rights of corporations, a bitterly divided Supreme Court on Thursday ruled that the government may not ban political spending by corporations in candidate elections.

So. This is already overthrown, right?
posted by Bokononist at 8:42 PM on November 24, 2010


Could someone explain to this Canadian what (D-TX) means? Is it democrat-Texas? I don't get it.

Fox News is infamous for captioning disgraced republicans as democrats, just a joke


Ah right, I thought it was hopefully a typo or somebody axe-grinding about Fox News. Guess I have my answer now.
posted by jmd82 at 8:45 PM on November 24, 2010


hamida2242: "blazecock: yes on the felony, axiom beat me to it. the record of conviction separate"

Okay.

Good.
posted by Blazecock Pileon at 9:13 PM on November 24, 2010


Overruling two important precedents about the First Amendment rights of corporations, a bitterly divided Supreme Court on Thursday ruled that the government may not ban political spending by corporations in candidate elections.

So. This is already overthrown, right?


Unless I'm mistaken (someone please correct me if so), Citizens United was about advertising and other "electioneering communications" supporting or opposing a candidate, rather than about donations directly to a campaign.
posted by naoko at 9:23 PM on November 24, 2010


Okay.

Good.


It's not going to hinder him at all, with the kind of money and connections he has. Even without the money or connections, he'd get his civil rights (except gun ownership) back after 3 years at most, and 5 years for guns (as far as TX is concerned, in AZ he wouldn't even need to wait that long). He'll still be a rich white guy with connections, and rich white guys with connections don't fill out applications on Monster and worry about checking the felony box, they just slide right into whatever nepotism hookup was arranged beforehand.

His only real cause for concern is this is a state beef, not federal; and Texas has some serious problems with prison violence- not that he'll be going to one of those facilities, and certainly not on the main line regardless of the facility. Will be interesting to see if he's able to swing a compact-transfer and do his time in a federal joint though. And he will probably wind up doing at least a little time, they locked up Traficant after all.
posted by hamida2242 at 9:43 PM on November 24, 2010


What rights do convicted Texas felons lose automatically simply by the fact of their status as convicted felons?

It would be pretty hilarious if he gets probation (likely), but then loses his voting rights by operation of law alone.
posted by webhund at 10:00 PM on November 24, 2010


Yeah, all this does is ensure his next book will be piled high on the littrachaw tables at Costco.
posted by Rat Spatula at 10:03 PM on November 24, 2010


Sugar Land is a great name for a city.
posted by longsleeves at 10:20 PM on November 24, 2010


What rights do convicted Texas felons lose automatically simply by the fact of their status as convicted felons?

No voting, no jury duty, no guns (or ammunition, or body armor), no holding public office, some limitations on licenses and credentials, ineligibility for certain government-backed loans.

Now, that's for a non-drug offense. Some non-felonies also remove rights (i.e. misdemeanor domestic violence = no guns).

With a drug-related offense, you lose a whole lot more. Check this out. Straight from the government's mouth: "use these procedures to enhance the impact of a drug conviction."

The list of benefits & privileges is much to long to quote here without readers just scrolling right past it, so check out the link.

And yes, even though it's a federal program it applies to both federal and state convictions (should the judge choose to fill out the easy-to-use form).
posted by hamida2242 at 10:23 PM on November 24, 2010 [1 favorite]


The amount of personal insults in here is bordering on absurd. He broke the law, it ruined his political career, shamed him in front of his peers, and justice is served, for once.

For once? Let's wait and see about that. DeLay has connections. That said:

DeLay is a traitor to his country. A hypocrite; a life-ruiner. Many politicians are, but DeLay is a giant among grand thieves and political perverts. I want to see his ilk in the slammer; doing hard time; made humble; BROKEN to tears! - I want a sobbing confession made on youtube from DeLay, made in his prison pajamas, in front of the single-toilet cell he shares with a few other hard-timers. There are thousands he broke and ruined with his paid-for legislation that favored the well-to-do, and penalized the lesser-knowns, costing entire lives to be ruined, and communities upset. Life in prison? YES! How about some real Texas justice? I'm against capital punishment, but DeLay deserves just short of that. Make him suffer! Follow that up with about 1000-2000 bankers and the politicos that they have paid off. Just look at Ireland and Greece - nay, America - to see the harm that these SOB's - these thieving, sociopathic SOB public and private sector traitors - have done - and we bailed them out? Get em! Chase 'em into a corner - make 'em squirm - shame them publicly, put 'em in the slammer, for YEARS, so when they get out nobody even remembers their rotten names - and then lets get on to repairing what's left of a nation that was once great.
posted by Vibrissae at 11:25 PM on November 24, 2010 [7 favorites]


Tom DeLay on Israel, Zionism, and the Rapture

"It's what I live for. I hope it comes tomoroow."
posted by hamida2242 at 11:45 PM on November 24, 2010 [1 favorite]


Yet, after all this, and the man still got a trial? Surely he could qualify as an enemy combatant and just be detained indefinitely?
posted by iamck at 1:26 AM on November 25, 2010


Just saw Casino Jack last night ... :)
posted by subcorpus at 1:49 AM on November 25, 2010


I wonder what kind of prison tattos he will get? Will he share his recipe for gourmet quality pruno? Will he teach younger inmates how to run political campaigns and stay out of gangs?

Or will he not?
posted by zaelic at 1:53 AM on November 25, 2010


Will he teach younger inmates how to run political campaigns and stay out of gangs?

How do you do that?
posted by Dr Dracator at 2:50 AM on November 25, 2010 [1 favorite]


It's taken five years from indictment to this, with only a 3 week trial.

Why the DeLay?
posted by MuffinMan at 4:31 AM on November 25, 2010


He broke the law, it ruined his political career, shamed him in front of his peers, and justice is served, for once.

Oh, pardon me. I suppose we should all comport ourselves better than this. After all, demonstrably corrupt and unrepentant politicians all around us are always swiftly smacked down, never to return to the public eye, right? We should be used to this sort of thing by now.
posted by Marisa Stole the Precious Thing at 4:50 AM on November 25, 2010


I can't help but think that if DeLay was a "D" from Texas as opposed to an "R", the comments here would be very different. Or more likely, there would be no comments at all because this post would never have made it here in the first place.
posted by bigwoopdeedoo at 6:08 AM on November 25, 2010


Or more likely, there would be no comments at all because this post would never have made it here in the first place.

I know, right?
posted by nomadicink at 7:10 AM on November 25, 2010 [9 favorites]


Owne(D).
posted by Marisa Stole the Precious Thing at 7:11 AM on November 25, 2010 [2 favorites]


President Palin will grant him a full pardon.
posted by Danf at 7:35 AM on November 25, 2010


I can't help but think that if DeLay was a "D" from Texas as opposed to an "R", the comments here would be very different. Or more likely, there would be no comments at all because this post would never have made it here in the first place.

As nomadicink has pointed out, this is total horseshit.

What Tom DeLay did, both to the Texas Legislature and to the U.S. Congress, should be egregious and appalling no matter which side of the aisle you favor. He permanently damaged the American legislative process.

To just dismiss those of us who support his conviction as brain-dead partisans indicates that you either don't really understand the circumstances around which DeLay was indicted in the first place... or that you are so extraordinarily right-wing that you support any illegal, corrupt activity by a politician so long as it benefits your side. Neither one is a very admirable position.

If you think MetaFilter leans too left, I have a crazy suggestion for you: stop lurking and actually contribute more.
posted by pineapple at 7:47 AM on November 25, 2010 [10 favorites]


Who wants to bet he'll serve 5 on the former and 2 on the latter.

Who am I kidding, he'll walk.
posted by unigolyn at 7:51 AM on November 25, 2010 [1 favorite]


DeLay got his start in the extermination business, and supposedly went into politics after the EPA banned his favorite pesticide. I used to think that Dale Gribbin from King of the Hill was based on DeLay, until I realized that Dale, despite being crazy, paranoid, and kind of a coward, was basically likeable.
posted by Halloween Jack at 8:42 AM on November 25, 2010


Alternate post titles:

The DeLay is over

After a long DeLay

DeLayed justice

Tom Delay is found guilty and deserves whatever's coming, the scumbag
posted by gottabefunky at 10:37 AM on November 25, 2010 [1 favorite]


To just dismiss those of us who support his conviction as brain-dead partisans indicates that you either don't really understand the circumstances around which DeLay was indicted in the first place... or that you are so extraordinarily right-wing that you support any illegal, corrupt activity by a politician so long as it benefits your side. Neither one is a very admirable position.

My point was that the comments would have been different, not that I do not support a lawful conviction by a jury of his peers. Justice served as far a I am concerned. I just seriously doubt waterboarding, caning or holding him indefinitely as an enemy combatant (all comments from above) would be thrown around if he was a democrat.
posted by bigwoopdeedoo at 11:21 AM on November 25, 2010


I appreciate the holiday spirit of the backpedal, but your revised position doesn't erase your suggestion that "...more likely, there would be no comments at all because this post would never have made it here in the first place." That was a crude sideways strike, and is pretty rich considering your user history is a year of lurking followed by a year of drive-by partisan political comments.
posted by pineapple at 11:27 AM on November 25, 2010 [1 favorite]


Actually I see a lot of gleeful jokes about sentencing but not a lot of personal insults. And you know, the guy is an elected representative who spit on his office and constituants and is now officially a convicted felon; I'm pretty sure I'm according him all the respect he deserves.

My point is not that he does not deserve insults. My point is that insults sound like childish spitballs after all the terrible nuclear precedents he set - gerrymandering is one of the worst of all political tools and DeLay helped pioneer their use. And the system of corporate contributions that are currently legal are far more damaging and corrupt than what DeLay was convicted for, as blatant as it was. If you want to say 'neeer neeer' that's fine but the ways in which he fucked up politics have already been institutionalized for years. You might as well spit into the face of a hurricane.

After all, demonstrably corrupt and unrepentant politicians all around us are always swiftly smacked down, never to return to the public eye, right?

And you missed my other point. Someone FINALLY was convicted. He won't serve office again, period. But there are hundreds more just like him in this broken system. We don't need insults. We need MORE convictions for the system to be even slightly less broken.
posted by infinitefloatingbrains at 11:30 AM on November 25, 2010


gerrymandering is one of the worst of all political tools and DeLay helped pioneer their use.

Ugh. I hate to make this point of order because I hate Tom DeLay more than most people have any reason to...

But, gerrymandering is two centuries old and has been a systemic abuse across most of the U.S. for practically that long. DeLay gave gerrymandering some platinum-plated innovations (and the citizens of Texas picked up the tab for it), but in fairness we can't really say he pioneered the process.
posted by pineapple at 11:35 AM on November 25, 2010


If you want to say 'neeer neeer' that's fine but the ways in which he fucked up politics have already been institutionalized for years.

The specific way he fucked up Texas politics is by pioneering mid-decade Congressional redistricting. I don't believe this innovation has been picked and duplicated anywhere else and I certainly hope it never is. As pineapple says, DeLay didn't invent gerrymandering, and he certainly didn't invent much of the rest of the laundry list of things I personally despise him for. I would love to see all of that cleaned up too, as unlikely as it is.

But this charge goes back to the redistricting-related business and that is unique to him. And if those of us who have to live with the problems his redistricting have caused enjoy some schadenfreude about seeing a law-and-order conservative convicted of a felony because he, unlike the rest of us, was above the law, I don't see what the problem is.
posted by immlass at 12:32 PM on November 25, 2010 [1 favorite]


We don't need insults. We need MORE convictions for the system to be even slightly less broken.

I'm going to go with "how about both?" here. Considering all the bile we've had to swallow since this guy reared his head over the political landscape, a nice, long, cathartic jeer is pretty satisfying, and doesn't stand in the way of "justice".
posted by Marisa Stole the Precious Thing at 12:40 PM on November 25, 2010 [1 favorite]


I was just thinking about how kind and considerate we were about Blago.
posted by Navelgazer at 2:47 PM on November 25, 2010 [1 favorite]



This is why we need mandatory minimums.

Whoa! Easy there. It's not like he was caught with a joint.
posted by notreally at 8:12 PM on November 25, 2010 [1 favorite]


Paul Burka, one of the deans of Texas political reporting, speculates on one of the possible political outcomes of the DeLay case: the Republican majority in the Texas legislature defunds the public integrity unit of the Travis County DA's office that brought this prosecution.
posted by immlass at 2:52 PM on November 26, 2010


What Tom DeLay did, both to the Texas Legislature and to the U.S. Congress, should be egregious and appalling no matter which side of the aisle you favor. He permanently damaged the American legislative process.

He's a politician. They're supposed to be cut throat. That's what they do. More depressing is that the Supreme Court upheld it - though perhaps they had little choice. In which case, write your congressman and demand a constitutional amendment. (I assume by "it" we are referring to the 2004 Texas redistricting case.) But I'm guessing both sides of the aisle now view this as a potential tool for the future rather than a loophole to be fixed.

But I do note that the commentary here has featured more bile than data. Our comrade from Canada is quite right to wonder what the hell. A more detailed bill of particulars would be a better comment than several lines of what a traitor he is.
posted by IndigoJones at 4:50 PM on November 27, 2010


2003, sorry.
posted by IndigoJones at 4:52 PM on November 27, 2010


A more detailed bill of particulars would be a better comment than several lines of what a traitor he is.

No snark here, I'm truly asking: are you saying it would be preferable for this thread to have recapped the entire set of events that led to DeLay's conviction?

Because, he's been discussed at great length on the site already, going back almost 10 years. And he is certainly a household name for anyone who pays more attention than "passing indifference" to U.S. politics. (which I do understand is about the level of most voting Americans anyway)

I personally can't be objective on this topic so I really don't know what site protocol would be preferred. Are we not allowed to do a followup post without having to hash back through a "more detailed bill of particulars"?
posted by pineapple at 2:05 PM on November 28, 2010


Well, no, a recap of the entire thing is overkill but some context would be nice. If for no other reason that not everyone arrives here with the full history; there are people who are not from the US, and people who are but were ten when this started. Just saying he was the former US Republican congressional leader would have given the post some more context at first glance. And since it has been mentioned before, some [previously] links seem to be the standard protocol.

I realise it was big news but it seemed a bit of a "top two Google results" rush post.
posted by DarlingBri at 8:59 PM on November 28, 2010


DarlingBri, I agree with you on this point. The post was slim, and with the benefit of hindsight, it does feel like a NewsFilter rush to first. As mentioned, Tom DeLay isn't even a household name to most Americans so some context would have helped.

I don't agree with IndigoJones that said context was incumbent upon commenters to provide, though.
posted by pineapple at 10:29 AM on December 2, 2010


Why Perry cannot immediately pardon Tom DeLay. There's already a movement afoot to have Governor Perry pardon him.
posted by immlass at 12:37 PM on December 2, 2010


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