March 27

Good evening, and welcome to SBS World News Australia. I'm...

Lee Lin Chin is an Australian television presenter best known for anchoring SBS World News for over a decade. She is also utterly hilarious, most recently attracting attention for her own take on a 'mean tweets' video. [more inside]
posted by Quilford at 9:25 PM - 1 comment

Leftist Concepts: Trust (x) vs. Agency (y)

Je ne suis pas liberal: Entering the quagmire of online leftism "Classifying leftist ideology in a framework of agency and trust, I find a buried contradiction at the heart of anti-oppressive activism, one in which practitioners pathologically self-position themselves in a space of chronic moral jeopardy."
posted by lalochezia at 8:16 PM - 26 comments

Pics or it didn't happen

How I taught my dog to text me selfies
posted by a lungful of dragon at 7:27 PM - 14 comments

Bitcoin Brawl

The Race to Replace Bitcoin
An epic battle between two bitcoin 2.0 contenders grips the crypto world
posted by andoatnp at 6:43 PM - 16 comments

Sparkly Vampires!

I want to give you a brief window into my life in this little corner of journalistic endeavor. Ready? Here goes. Today, the Verge newsroom got into a heated debate about whether or not vampires can poop. I'm not kidding.
This is the greatest Yahoo! Answer on whether vampires can poop
posted by jenkinsEar at 5:58 PM - 35 comments

Try not to get stuck!

Deep Cave in Edwards, Texas, has a regular entrance, and a ...rather more claustrophobic one.
posted by Blue Jello Elf at 4:17 PM - 37 comments

Can't Keep From Crying

John Renbourn, the highly influential English guitar player, and one of the co-founders of Pentangle, has died. There's a nice appreciation from The Guardian here. Farewell, Mr. Renbourn.
posted by talking leaf at 4:13 PM - 21 comments

H₂WHOA!

Toshio Shibata’s Mesmerizing Photographs of Water [New York Times]
The Japanese photographer Toshio Shibata is fascinated by water — in particular, the way it interacts with man-made structures. For the later half of his almost-40-year career in photography, he has explored this relationship in novel ways, hiding horizon lines and taking the perspective of the water itself with his camera, visually evoking its rushing sound.
posted by Fizz at 2:36 PM - 7 comments

Anyone have a Pop-up blocker? For houses?

Washington DC is going through a real estate boom. Except there isn’t a lot of real estate to build on. The unique combination of population density, rapidly gentrifying neighborhoods and lax zoning and code regulations means developers eager to cash in on the District’s real estate boom have been taking hundred year old rowhouses bought for a song, throwing on a third floor “pop-up” and converting them into condo units. More often than not, the designs of the pop-ups look nothing like the rest of the neighborhood, prompting neighbor ire about the character of the neighborhood architecture being changed. [more inside]
posted by Karaage at 2:10 PM - 48 comments

On Swedish dads, paternity leave and adorable, tow-headed kids

This sweet set of photographs by photographer Johan Bävman depicts Swedish men caring for their children during paternity leave. Many of these men indicate that they are still considered rather unusual despite Sweden's notably progressive stance on paternity leave. The UK is changing, too: from this coming month, paternity leave will be more generous for men thanks to the efforts of the Lib Dems.
posted by averysmallcat at 2:07 PM - 13 comments

Why not a whole fryer?

We initially started with 12 or 13 ingredients in the Bloody Mary. But one day, about two and a half years ago, I stuck a cheeseburger on a toothpick on a Bloody Mary and wrote on a Facebook post: “Am I going too far?” The next thing I knew, I had 100 comments. Everyone loved it. It seemed to me to be so ridiculous, but I got home and I sat down at the table and said to my wife, “Wow, I think we’re on to something.”
--I Started Milwaukee’s Epic Bloody Mary Garnish Wars
posted by almostmanda at 1:20 PM - 42 comments

Making More Time For Work

The Shut-In Economy The dream of on-demand, delivery everything is splitting tech-centered cities into two new classes: shut-ins and servants.
posted by The Whelk at 1:13 PM - 50 comments

Uptown Passover

This is that age old
Passover tale that's retold
This is what we listen to
While eatin' through those matzah pieces

posted by internet fraud detective squad, station number 9 at 12:46 PM - 15 comments

It started with Dinosaurs

I Raised Henry. A brief photo essay.
posted by gwint at 12:12 PM - 15 comments

Outlook favorable

Obamacare turned 5 years old this week and the overall negative popular opinion on the legislation is starting to be replaced by positive experiences. GOP Congresswoman Cathy McMorris Rodgers (WA) found this out to her chagrin when she posted an image on her official Facebook page, slamming the Affordable Care Act and asking constituents to share their Obamacare nightmare stories. The response probably wasn't what she expected.
posted by Potomac Avenue at 12:05 PM - 89 comments

In Sweden, you don’t do anything until you do it right.

...he co-wrote four songs on the Backstreet Boys’ self-titled 1996 debut album, one of which, “Quit Playing Games With My Heart,” went to #2 on the Billboard Hot 100. And with that, his career took off. You probably know most of what comes next. For instance, you probably know that, to date, Martin has co-written 19 songs that went to #1 on the Hot 100, and another 36 that charted in the top 10 but didn't manage to hit #1. You probably know that many of those songs were recorded by Katy Perry (who has recorded 10 top-10 songs with Martin), Taylor Swift (six top-10 songs with Martin), Britney Spears (also six), P!nk (five), and the Backstreet Boys (five). You might also know that Martin’s 19 chart-toppers put him at third place on the all-time list behind Paul McCartney (32) and John Lennon (26). Stereogum's Michael Nelson on superproducer/songwriter Max Martin, complete with a list of 30 Essential Max Martin Songs.
posted by everybody had matching towels at 11:40 AM - 30 comments

“It’s always the husband. Just watch Dateline,”

The Husband Did It - "Gone Girl depicts the true crime obsession as a feedback loop"
posted by the man of twists and turns at 11:33 AM - 22 comments

Who the Hell Is Stromae?

"All over SXSW, kiosks were plastered with posters that posed a provocative question: "Who the hell is Stromae?" It's a question you wouldn't ask in many places outside North America. " NPR's SXSW showcase at Stubb's BBQ attempted to answer the question for an American audience who aren't necessarily too familiar with the superstar Belgian musician/rapper/fashion designer. [more inside]
posted by yasaman at 11:15 AM - 18 comments

Tacos in Los Angeles

Tacos 101: Part I: History and Etiquette. Part II: Condiments, Meat, and Tortillas. Part III: The LA Taco Scene. A Beginner’s Guide to Offal Tacos. The Rise of the Compton Taco. Tacopedia: A Complete Guide to the Taco Styles of LA.
posted by Juliet Banana at 10:55 AM - 37 comments

When two fonts love each other very much...

Move over Brangelina. And Bennifer. And Kimye, TomKat*, and Desilu. And sporks. And ligers. EVERYONE MOVE OVER! We're making room for the world's first genetically engineered superfont.
Comic Papyrus is finally here. [more inside]
posted by sparklemotion at 10:50 AM - 38 comments

Making cats look silly, for a good cause

Saving birds' lives at the risk of making cats die of embarrassment
Domestic cats and tweety birds the world over have had a long-standing and rather one-sided feud: cats kill as many as 3.7 billion birds, mostly songbirds, every year in the US alone. One Vermont-based company, Birdsbesafe, is seeking to protect our feathery friends while imposing a little whimsical shame on our murdery, furry friends. How? With terrible, early-90s-esque scrunchies.
posted by Lexica at 10:38 AM - 71 comments

What is up with bra sizing, anyway?

In recent years, many women will have noticed new articles insisting that most of us wear bras that don't fit and that women should measure themselves in a new way. But the sizes that are easily and cheaply available to women are nowhere near the sizes that these experts insist women should be wearing. How did this state of affairs come to be? It turns out the answer lies in the history of bra manufacture. [more inside]
posted by sciatrix at 10:30 AM - 52 comments

When the invaders came, they went underground. No, not metaphorically.

Massive Underground City Found in Cappadocia Region of Turkey When the invaders came, Cappadocians knew where to hide: underground, in one of the 250 subterranean safe havens they had carved from pliable volcanic ash rock called tuff. [more inside]
posted by Michele in California at 9:37 AM - 13 comments

Obama gets to know Omar

President interviews David Simon
posted by savitarka at 9:37 AM - 17 comments

Rated SC for self control

Time for a Sesame Street parody: Star S'Mores (Star Wars), with Cookie Monster and Grover as guest stars. [more inside]
posted by Wolfster at 9:22 AM - 11 comments

Billy Zane is Alive and Well - Also it's Z-A-N-E

Actor Billy Zane responds to a... somewhat confusing outpouring of grief from his fans - particularly the tween girl segment of his fandom, which is apparently far greater than he realized - who seem to believe something bad has happened to him. Billy would like to reassure his... very devoted fans he is alive and well, while wishing they'd pay a little more attention to how he spells his name.... [more inside]
posted by Naberius at 8:14 AM - 42 comments

"Hobsbawm was a marked man, and he knew it"

The two sides in the Cold War, finding each other irresistible, ended up in a contrapuntal relationship where, as George Urban put it, ‘they marched in negative step, but in step all the same.’ They had their spies, we had ours. They had their files, we had ours. True, we didn’t have gulags. But what kind of democracy is it that congratulates itself on not having gulags? Never mind the dragnet surveillance, the burglaries, the smearing of reputations, the bugging of public telephone boxes, cafés, hotels, banks, trade unions, private homes, all this legitimised by the thesis that everyone is a potential subversive until proven otherwise – the problem is that the defenders of the realm took on the symptoms of the disease they were meant to cure.
– In the essay Stuck on the Flypaper historian and journalist Frances Stonor Saunders goes through the recently released MI5 file on Marxist historian Eric Hobsbawm [previously] to explain how the British secret service surveilled and interfered with the lives of British citizens during World War II and the early part of the Cold War.
posted by Kattullus at 8:09 AM - 9 comments

Forget poison ivy

The Gympie Gympie is an Australian plant with spindly stems and heart-shaped light green leaves. Brushing your hand against it can make you throw up from the pain. Using it as toilet paper has made people shoot themselves. (SLio9)
posted by Chrysostom at 7:41 AM - 54 comments

The TSA checklist

A 92-point checklist, obtained and published by The Intercept, reveals what kind of passenger behavior can merit a red flag for TSA agents responsible for pulling out possible terrorists and criminals out of airport security lines. [more inside]
posted by roomthreeseventeen at 7:23 AM - 103 comments

Towards a 21st century orchestral canon

In December, grad student and occasional NYT music writer Will Robin asked on Twitter, "What are the best large-scale orchestral works of this century?" He Storified the responses, with links for listening, and then on Tuesday, streamed the result: Symphomania, a 24-hour marathon of sixty 21st-century orchestral works by sixty different composers, on Q2 Music at WQXR in New York. Starting tonight at midnight, WQXR is repeating the stream. [more inside]
posted by mediareport at 7:17 AM - 5 comments

The Foundling Wheel's return.

The recent Christian documentary "The Drop Box" (trailer) tells the story of a South Korean pastor who, after finding an abandoned baby on this doorstep, decides to create a drop box in his own home for people to leave their unwanted infants. The use of Baby Hatches (or Foundling Wheels) goes back centuries in Europe and parts of Asia, and there has been a recent reemergence of them. China's own baby hatch program was started a year ago and has been very successful. Various European countries have similar programs that have been going on for more than a decade. On the other side of the ocean, Canada successfully implemented their own Angel's Cradle program five years ago, and there has even been a recent effort to create Baby Boxes in the United States.
posted by AlonzoMosleyFBI at 5:38 AM - 21 comments

The Last LA Freeway

Although competing theories about urban planning were part of the long battle, it was about more than just the best way to move people through a sprawling megalopolis. The freeway became a focal point for resistance to paternalistic urban renewal, but then, ultimately, an example of socially responsible civil engineering. When the rubber finally hit the road on the 105, Judge Pregerson’s ruling ensured that central planners could no longer impose public-works projects on communities without residents having their say.
posted by ellieBOA at 1:50 AM - 8 comments

Going flat

"You’ll be standing in front of a classroom, and you’ll want to look pretty." Mary-Anne Mohanraj writes about a conversation with her breast surgeon, who was shocked when Mohanraj suggested she might not want breast reconstruction after surgery. [more inside]
posted by Athanassiel at 12:46 AM - 19 comments

March 26

Hearts a mess

A recent study suggests younger women who have heart attacks may hesitate to get help because they’re afraid of being labeled hypochondriacs. But the bigger problem is just how justified that fear really is. - Is medicine's gender bias killing young women? [Pacific Standard] [more inside]
posted by supercrayon at 11:24 PM - 80 comments

I'm really good at... sneezing on your mouth

If Cats Were on OKCupid
[ via | via | for dogs ]
posted by not_on_display at 10:14 PM - 18 comments

Cooking in the 21st Century

3 Second Cooking, in Japan: Fried Shrimp and Fried Dumplings.
posted by Chocolate Pickle at 4:46 PM - 37 comments

Shigir Idol

The oldest wooden statue in the world was found in a Russian bog in 1890. The Shigir Idol is believed to be about 9500 years old. It is 2.8 meters high; an additional 1.93 meters of statue were lost during the turmoil of the 20th century.
posted by Blue Jello Elf at 4:10 PM - 21 comments

Yemen on Brink of Civil War

Yemen's President Abd-Rabbu Mansour Hadi has fled the country as Saudi Arabia initiates a bombing campaign against the Houthi rebels. A ground invasion by Egypt and other members of Saudi Arabia's 10-country coalition is apparently to follow the bombing. The United States has withdrawn its special operations forces from Yemeni territory with a potential civil war looming. [more inside]
posted by Noisy Pink Bubbles at 3:56 PM - 81 comments

A Clean Version of Hell

Inside America's Toughest Federal Prison For years, conditions inside the United States’ only federal supermax facility were largely a mystery. But a landmark lawsuit is finally revealing the harsh world within. (SLNYT)
posted by box at 1:47 PM - 60 comments

The biggest challenge for a woman working in construction? Bathrooms.

Twenty Questions for Women in Construction was a series of blog posts about female construction workers in NYC which ran on Huffington Post in 2013. Kicking off the series was the article A Day in the Life of a Woman in Construction by Ana Taveras. Many of the respondents to the Twenty Questions series are graduates of Nontraditional Employment for Women. [more inside]
posted by showbiz_liz at 12:27 PM - 40 comments

If you learn by doing, this is for you.

Code4startup is an online resource that lets you clone and hack copies of real services you already use on the web to make something new and cool You have an idea and want to quickly build your own web app for startup? Code4startup throws you into the deep end of the pool of established services, TaskRabbit, Udemy, AirBnb, Fiverr... explains how they are constructed with various technologies and then lets you bang on the code of these to make something new and cool for yourself. Angular JS, Bootstrap, Wufoo, ChromeDeveloperTools, Rails... and more to come.
posted by bobdow at 12:10 PM - 34 comments

'casts for your 'pod

Stuff You Missed In History Class [more inside]
posted by the man of twists and turns at 11:24 AM - 45 comments

One man's "cogito" is another's "white mask"

"In short, it seems that when a white male thinks about the meaning of things, any things, it is philosophy..." (SLTheGuardian)
posted by joseph conrad is fully awesome at 11:06 AM - 95 comments

Spoon us today our daily spoon

Stian Korntved Ruud is nearing the end of a yearlong project in which he designs and crafts a unique wooden spoon every day. He's using hand tools exclusively. You can follow the results and see a little of the process on instagram. Via core77.
posted by hydrophonic at 11:01 AM - 17 comments

Anti-LGBT Bill Leads SalesForce to Reduce Investments in Indiana

Marc Benioff, CEO of Salesforce, along with six other Indiana tech CEOs, co-signed a letter opposing the a bill which would allow business to refuse to serve LGBT customers. When asked about his participation in the effort, Benioff said in an email to IBJ: "We will be forced to dramatically reduce our investment in Indiana based on our employees' and customers' outrage over the Indiana religious freedom bill." [more inside]
posted by dotgirl at 11:00 AM - 156 comments

Should losing on purpose in sports be considered morally corrupt?

The NHL instituted a draft lottery system after the Ottawa Senators flopped to select Alexandre Daigle first overall in 1993. The gambit backfired. Daigle is considered among hockey’s biggest draft busts. Former Washington Capitals coach Ron Wilson admitted this month – without providing all the details – his general manager, George McPhee, ordered him to lose down the 1998-99 homestretch to improve draft position. The NBA changed its postseason seeding rules when the 2005-06 Los Angeles Clippers seemingly tanked games to dodge Cuban’s Mavericks in the first round. The 2006 Swedish hockey team lost a game to avoid playing Canada or Russia in the Olympic quarterfinals. Four women’s badminton doubles teams were ejected from the 2012 Olympics for throwing round-robin matches to manipulate their seedings. Last month, two Tennessee high school girls’ basketball teams were banned from their postseason. They tried to lose to each other and avoid playing the defending state champ in the regional tournament. They committed blatant fouls and even shot into the wrong basket. The Ethics of Tanking
posted by everybody had matching towels at 10:34 AM - 76 comments

"Are you a nice goat?"

Man has a goat & llama encounter in upstate NY.
posted by The Whelk at 10:28 AM - 37 comments

Gender Diversity in All Its Colorful Glory

Drew Riley explores the visibility "explosion" for trans and gender-nonconforming people in gritty, vibrant portraits that capture the eye.
Transgender and gender-nonconforming figures rarely pop from the page quite like they do in artist Drew Riley's new collection Gender Portraits. Painted with splashes of bright color, full of dynamic movement or charged silence, and set against whimsical or brooding backdrops, Riley's portraits are nothing short of arresting. They pull the viewer in for a closer look — which is exactly the response Riley was aiming for, she tells The Advocate.
[more inside]
posted by Lexica at 10:05 AM - 11 comments

Scenes From the Death of a College

"Alumnae like to describe Sweet Briar College as a magical place ... That sense of magic evaporated in early March, after the board of directors decided that Sweet Briar’s failure to increase its revenue in recent decades had driven it to the brink of financial collapse. The board had voted unanimously on February 28 to close the 700-student college at the end of the current academic year."
posted by svenx at 10:00 AM - 36 comments

The Rise and Fall of the Borscht Belt

As the term borscht implies, the people who worked and stayed in the hotels and bungalow colonies were almost all Jews. The “fall” in the title of Davis’s film refers to the tourist industry collapsing after Jews became wealthier and more assimilated. After moving from the garment industry cutting rooms to accounting firms, they could now afford vacations in Puerto Rico and no longer felt the need to be in a hotel that served kosher food.
The Rise and Fall of the Borscht Belt, a 1986 documentary by Peter Davis on the famous Jewish-American holiday resorts of the Catskills, has been put online by Louis Proyect.
posted by MartinWisse at 9:47 AM - 13 comments

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