May 19, 2014

An impending train wreck in social psychology.

The current critique of experimental social science is coming mainly from the inside. Strohminger, Simmons, and a handful of other mostly young researchers are at the heart of a kind of reform movement in their field. Together with a loose confederation of crusading journal editors and whistle-blowing bloggers, they have begun policing the world of experimental research, assiduously rooting out fraud and error, as if to rescue the scientific method from embarrassment—and from its own success. The Reformation: Can Social Scientists Save Themselves?
posted by Ghostride The Whip at 11:53 PM PST - 50 comments

The Racoon Not Only Talks, He Also Adjusts Himself

The new "Guardians of the Galaxy" trailer conclusively proves that the Star Wars films really would've benefited from a '70s superhits soundtrack. And details are beginning to trickle in concerning the Agent Carter series, including the fact that the show will include Howard Stark, Gabe Jones, and Dum Dum Duggan.
posted by Ipsifendus at 8:27 PM PST - 168 comments

The twilight of NASA

Use a trampoline. “The cancellation of the space shuttle may be the biggest blunder ever made by the United States,” Kraft said. “It’s fairly obvious that no one in the government thought through what they were about to bring about when they made that decision.”
posted by bitmage at 8:06 PM PST - 88 comments

Baa Baa Black Sheep, have you any, uh… wool?

The Age of Uncertainty, A Personal View by John Kenneth Galbraith was a 12 (or 15) part documentary mini-series about the fickle art of economics, co-produced by the BBC, CBC, KCET & OECA, and broadcast on television in 1977. Galbraith’s dry Scottish Canadian wit, and the 70’s-style art-direction, are worth viewing for those who like this sort of thing. The parody corporate videos for the Conglomerate UGE anticipated some of the ideas explored later in the 2003 documentary The Corporation. Some parts will seem dated, considering that this series was produced in the thick of The Cold War, before the rise of Reaganomics, Thatcherism, The Fall of the Berlin Wall, the rise of the EU, yuan, electronic transfers, etc. The basic insights about the instability of financial markets are still real, as always. [more inside]
posted by ovvl at 6:26 PM PST - 5 comments

The 9/11 Museium Is Open

"The exhibition starts with one shining, unfathomably terrible morning and winds up as all of our lives, as banal and constant as laundry, bottomless.. . . I think now of every war memorial I ever yawned through on a class trip, how someone else’s past horror was my vacant diversion and maybe I learned something but I didn’t feel anything. Everyone should have a museum dedicated to the worst day of their life and be forced to attend it with a bunch of tourists from Denmark." [more inside]
posted by schroedinger at 5:31 PM PST - 98 comments

One Scene, One Shot

The Spielberg Oner: "One overlooked aspect of Spielberg is that he's actually a stealth master of the long take. From Duel to Tintin, for forty years, he has sneakily filmed many scenes in a single continuous shot." [more inside]
posted by brundlefly at 4:44 PM PST - 58 comments

Ambient art

Line Segments Space by Kimchi and Chips
posted by Blazecock Pileon at 2:15 PM PST - 2 comments

NSA's SOMALGET recording every phone call in the Bahamas

The NSA is recording the audio of every phone call in the Bahamas and in another country which the article does not name "in response to specific, credible concerns that doing so could lead to increased violence." Previously
posted by Noisy Pink Bubbles at 1:44 PM PST - 86 comments

MATTES - Like you've never seen them before!

Huge collection of (and commentary on) matte art from classic films that has been rescanned for HD releases. Much more on the process of creating and filming this type of setup at last month's post. (previously)
posted by BlackLeotardFront at 12:53 PM PST - 13 comments

I feel that picture you love lives in you.

Camille Lepage, a 26 year old photojournalist who dedicated her burgeoning career to reporting what the media seemed to ignore, was killed Tuesday while on assignment documenting the conflict in Central African Republic. As well as some amazing photography from her most recent work in CAR, Lepage worked in South Sudan on stories about young men drawn into the war, birth in a refugee camp, and less formal photography on instagram.
posted by ChuraChura at 12:33 PM PST - 21 comments

"It is at times difficult to see past the shrillness of the debate"

A federal judge in Oregon has overturned that state's ban on same sex marriage, opening the door for couples to begin getting married immediately. (PDF) [more inside]
posted by roomthreeseventeen at 12:21 PM PST - 112 comments

"The best things happen just before the thread snaps."

Slings & Arrows (trailer) was an award-winning Canadian dramedy that enjoyed great critical reception on both sides of the border. It ran for three seasons from 2003 to 2006, produced by Rhombus Media with Niv Fichman as Executive Producer, and aired on Showcase, The Movie Network, and Movie Central. Co-written by Mark McKinney (of Kids in the Hall fame), Susan Coyne (a Canadian playwright, actor, novelist, Stratford veteran, and co-founder of Toronto's Soulpepper Theatre), and Bob Martin (a comedian, creator of The Drowsy Chaperone, which won five Tony awards), the show starred Paul Gross (possibly most famous for his role on Due South, also a Stratfordian actor), Martha Burns (a major Canadian actor and another founding member of Soulpepper, another Stratfordian), and Stephen Ouimette (another major Canadian actor who, unsurprisingly, has also spent time onstage at Stratford), as well as Coyne and McKinney. The show takes place in the fictional town of New Burbage, which is a stand-in for a thinly-veiled Stratford Festival, which most of the actors and creative team have acted and/or directed in. The writers take great pains to note that they aren't mocking Stratford in the series, but there are obvious parallels. The entire run of the series was directed by Peter Wellington. (There are many spoilers inside, and in the critical reception links, for those who haven't yet watched the show). Much [more inside]
posted by feckless fecal fear mongering at 11:59 AM PST - 56 comments

Uncertain 90's-ier then "I Wanna Be A Gabber Baby" is actually possible

Terrorcore, for when you are listening to "I Wanna Be A Gabber Baby" and thinking "Man, I wish my 90's techno nostalgia could get just a bit 90's-ier"
posted by mediocre at 11:42 AM PST - 18 comments

At least someone can afford to pay down their debts.

Student Debt Grows Faster at Universities With Highest-Paid Leaders, Study Finds (SLNYT) 'At the 25 public universities with the highest-paid presidents, both student debt and the use of part-time adjunct faculty grew far faster than at the average state university from 2005 to 2012...The study, “The One Percent at State U: How University Presidents Profit from Rising Student Debt and Low-Wage Faculty Labor,” examined the relationship between executive pay, student debt and low-wage faculty labor at the 25 top-paying public universities.' Report here.
posted by MisantropicPainforest at 9:53 AM PST - 25 comments

strawberry-rosemary-gin peach-thyme-tequila raspberry-lavender-champagne

Three bartenders in a backyard teach you how to make three classic summer drinks on a budget: the daiquiri, the gin & tonic, and the mint julep. Not simple enough? How about the only summer cocktail recipe you will ever need?
posted by Juliet Banana at 9:21 AM PST - 105 comments

Sharp Reporting

Transcription: WAHH Traffic | Aired May 19, 2043 — 20:25:00 ET [more inside]
posted by Potomac Avenue at 9:17 AM PST - 12 comments

The Longitude Prize is back after 300 years

To commemorate the 300th Anniversary of the original Longitude Prize (won by John Harrison with the invention of a clock that could keep time at sea), UK charity Nesta has launched a new £10million prize to encourage inventors and scientists to find a solution to one of six problems facing the world. [more inside]
posted by Jakey at 8:43 AM PST - 22 comments

"We turn the cube and it twists us."

Today's Google Doodle, in honour of the 40th anniversary of the Rubik's Cube. — a fully functional, animated Rubik's Cube. [Click here for the interactive version.] [Related]
posted by Fizz at 8:21 AM PST - 27 comments

The horrrific 2014 GM rolling sarcophagus deathtraps are here!

What do the words "safety," ''chaotic" and "problem" have in common? They're all on General Motors' list of banned words for employees who were documenting potential safety issues. The revelation of the 68-word list is one of the odder twists in GM's ongoing recall of 2.6 million older-model small cars for defective ignition switches. Last Week Tonight with John Oliver weighs in.
posted by Room 641-A at 7:41 AM PST - 78 comments

The web of our life is of a mingled yarn, good and ill together

This stop-motion video for British rock band James's song "Moving On" tells a tale of life, death, joy, and grief, using only yellow yarn. The video was created by BAFTA-nominated animator, writer, and director Ainslie Henderson. (SLYT)
posted by orange swan at 6:58 AM PST - 21 comments

No one likes a sore loser, Scott.

Jean and Scott is a web comic by Max Wittert, depicting domestic life between the X-Men Cyclops and Jean Grey. [episode 1] [episode 2] [episode 3] [episode 4] [episode 5] [episode 6] [episode 7] [more inside]
posted by 1970s Antihero at 6:41 AM PST - 22 comments

"enormous transfers of wealth take place from the sheep to the wolves"

"In 1992, George Soros brought the Bank of England to its knees. In the process, he pocketed over a billion dollars. Making a billion dollars is by all accounts pretty cool. But demolishing the monetary system of Great Britain in a single day with an elegantly constructed bet against its currency? That’s the stuff of legends."
posted by MartinWisse at 4:58 AM PST - 69 comments

"Alistair was a great writer. Everyone knows that..."

Alistair Macleod, one of Canada's greatest writers, has passed away. With just one novel, and two collections of short stories to his name, Macleod left an indelible mark on Canadian, and modern, literature. Other writers share their memories at the National Post (skip the first, Joyce Carol Oates' completely bland and characterless effort). At the Globe and Mail, Steven Galloway shares his own stories with Alistair. [more inside]
posted by smoke at 12:51 AM PST - 9 comments

Size Comparison - Science Fiction spaceships

Starship size comparison chart
posted by paleyellowwithorange at 12:20 AM PST - 79 comments

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