October 4, 2008
Tilt-shift videos
We have already seen here tilt-shift still photographs. Here come real life miniatures videos: beach , Sydney harbor, Harrowdown Hill music video, Spanish neighborhood, bridges in Grand Rapids, cars in Matewan, WV, Multnomah Falls, train station in Bern. [via]
posted by b. at 9:40 PM PST - 32 comments

A Nun's Life
When I was growing up, I did not dress up as a nun for Halloween. When I was a young, impressionable Catholic school girl, I did not secretly (or otherwise) pine for the veils, habits, odd religious names, and overall mystique of the nuns who taught me. The whole “nun” thing kind of snuck up on me when I wasn’t paying much attention. A Nun's Life is the eclectic personal blog of Sister Julie, a Servant of the Immaculate Heart of Mary and a Star Wars fangirl.
posted by amyms at 8:37 PM PST - 18 comments

Making A Bad Movie
It was the 80's. We were younger then, and anything seemed possible. So it all seemed part of Destiny when my very first screenplay was bought and produced; fame and fortune was surely just around the corner. HA! Fat chance.- The making of Forever Evil.
posted by Artw at 6:26 PM PST - 8 comments

Hey, buddy, you're full of *%#@!
In these final days the campaign,with the promise of more mudslinging looming large on the horizon, tempers flaring, political threads raging out of control, it's important to remember that religion and politics often make some people give way to ranting and raving and carrying on like emotional children... [more inside]
posted by louche mustachio at 6:22 PM PST - 23 comments

Akhenaten and Akhetaten
Akhetaten (a.k.a. Amarna) was the city built by Pharaoh Akhenaten, famous for his monotheistic beliefs and his queen, Nefertiti and son, Tutankhamun. The Amarna Letters has translations of correspondence sent to the Akhenaten, but a trove of it was found at the Amarna site. During his reign a distinctive style of art rose to prominence, only to vanish after his death. The Boston MFA has 40 objects from the era in its collection. Perhaps the most famous of the cultural artifacts of Akhenaten is the Great Hymn to Aten (hieroglyphics, four different English translations: 1, 2, 3, 4). This poem was set to music by Philip Glass for his opera Akhnaten (information about the opera). Some see direct parallels between The Great Hymn to Aten and Psalm 104. Though it was billed as a new beginning, like many utopias, Amarna was no haven for the regular folk who lived there.
posted by Kattullus at 4:55 PM PST - 23 comments

From the original Greek, meaning 'I like big donuts'
A Brief History of English, with Chronology by Suzanne Kemmer is one of many articles at Words in English, a website designed as "a resource for those who want to learn more about this fascinating language – its history as a language, the origins of its words, and its current modern characteristics."
posted by blue_beetle at 4:36 PM PST - 38 comments

Not just another ghost story
Its Fall and a perfect time to make a road trip. Its more than just a hip movie location, Marfa, Texas is home to bizarre food options and of course the world famous Mystery Lights.
posted by shockingbluamp at 4:09 PM PST - 16 comments

Iron-clad mini feet pounding the dust
Guide Horse Foundation - Guide Horse NO.
posted by Wolfdog at 3:58 PM PST - 27 comments

Plunka-plunka-plunk, plunka-plunka-plunk, plunk, plunk, plunk.
The Ukulele Orchestra of Great Britain performs the theme to "Shaft" (SYTL). Really, is any description needed? [more inside]
posted by WCityMike at 3:45 PM PST - 46 comments

art history
All-Art.org provides an extensive image library, essays and information on art history, organized by date and movement, up to the 20th century, including photography, design and classical music with audio samples. A small selection of the encyclopedic range offered: Erotica in Art l Paintings that changed the world l The Origins of Typography and Graphic design l Russian Silver Age l Japanese Prints l African l Posters l A Brief History of Western Literature l An illustrated dictionary of art and artists. [more inside]
posted by nickyskye at 3:27 PM PST - 7 comments

Make-Believe Maverick
Make-Believe Maverick. "A closer look at the life and career of John McCain reveals a disturbing record of recklessness and dishonesty."
posted by homunculus at 2:00 PM PST - 120 comments

We'll do it live!
The Li'l O'Reilly Factor SLYT
via Ectoplamosis, via The Percy Trout Hour
posted by JHarris at 1:31 PM PST - 30 comments

Tom Davis Gives Up
Tom Davis Gives Up (SLNYT). “Tell them about the important work we’re doing while Rome burns,” he said. A candid accounting of American politics from a member of the GOP disillusioned with both sides of the aisle and an overview of how he became that way.
posted by schroedinger at 12:52 PM PST - 39 comments

Sarah Palin's Poujadist Agenda
Sarah Palin has put a new face and voice to the long-standing, powerful, but inchoate movement in US political life that one might see as a mutant variety of Poujadism, inflected with a modern American accent.
[more inside]
posted by y2karl at 12:32 PM PST - 114 comments

What Are You Doing Here?
What Are You Doing Here? [more inside]
posted by feelinglistless at 9:44 AM PST - 33 comments

The Light and the Truth
Urim and Thummim were a mystical medium used by ancient Israelites to divine God's will and, according to some interpretations, to distinguish sinners from non-sinners. Todd Walker believes he has found the Urim and Thummim (in a Goodwill Superstore in Nashville, TN). He would like to share this miracle with you. Quicktime trailer
posted by kimdog at 9:29 AM PST - 32 comments

lions and other wildlife from the African bush
Brutal or Amazing? - this is just one of many fine posts on the Photo Africa Blog, an excellent source of in-the-wild animal and nature photos and reports from bush field guides. Also see: Madikwe Lions.
posted by madamjujujive at 7:49 AM PST - 20 comments

Bacon Cat in the New York Times
Bacon Cat in the New York Times With the presidential race heating up and the financial bailout package passing Congress on Friday, the New York Times thought this was the perfect time for a hard hitting look at straight, single men who own cats. So of course they wanted input from author John Scalzi, who by virtue of the fact that he is married, is not single. He does own Bacon Cat though.
posted by COD at 7:15 AM PST - 47 comments

Free for All!
"One dude's quest to save democracy!" Free for All! is a new documentary about the 2004 Ohio election results, which decided the presidential winner. It covers some familiar ground, but also a lot of details you might have missed. You can see it in theaters on October 8, or view it online right now. Here's Roger Ebert's review.
posted by Fuzzy Skinner at 7:11 AM PST - 28 comments

Inspiring Artists
Woosta is an interview driven website that is dedicated to the promotion of artists and their work. [mild nsfw] [more inside]
posted by netbros at 6:39 AM PST - 2 comments

The young Dylan on TV
Back in 1963, a TV special called "Folk Songs and More Folk Songs" aired, which featured a cross section of the "folk" artists who were at that time just beginning to receive wider media exposure. Aside from the squeaky-clean, white bread embarrassment of groups like The Brothers Four, the show redeemed itself with performances by a very young Bob Dylan, who sang The Ballad of Hollis Brown (with banjo and bass accompaniment) and Man of Constant Sorrow. And here's two more very early Dylan TV appearances, from Canada, 1964: A Hard Rain's a-Gonna Fall and Girl From the North Country. Here's the same Girl From the North Country performed years later, once again on broadcast TV, in duet with Johnny Cash, from the Johnny Cash Show. [more inside]
posted by flapjax at midnite at 4:32 AM PST - 23 comments

The Darker Side of Charity
Charity Navigator is most interesting for the CEO salaries, but non-profits are a huge segment of society. Melissa Data lists all the organizations with nonprofit status for your zip. This is an excellent rant on one of them.
posted by Bitter soylent at 3:03 AM PST - 31 comments