Posts with Recent Comments

Go Tell It on the Mountain

The last time he hiked to the top of Stone Mountain before embarking on a new life in South America, longtime Atlanta writer and novelist Charles McNair saw a ghost, had a dream and found a new, pure heart in the old mountain.”
posted by ob1quixote on May 27 at 12:18 AM - 3 comments

FIFA officials arrested on corruption charges

FIFA officials, in Zurich for their annual meeting, were arrested this morning by Swiss authorities. They will be extradited to the United States to face charges of wire fraud, racketeering, and money laundering.
posted by thecjm on May 26 at 9:11 PM - 77 comments

More items from Shaun Tan's federal department of odds and ends

Shaun Tan (previously, twice) is most identified with his distinctly surreal style of 2D still art, but he has also worked in sculpted and animated forms, as seen in his pieces inspired by recently revised stories of the Brothers Grimm, and The Lost Thing, a short film based on his book of the same name.
posted by filthy light thief on May 26 at 9:38 PM - 2 comments

Polymorphic sentient rocks! They're here to hollow out the Earth!

Is your love for jewels hampered by their inability to take on humanoid forms? Do you wish Adventure Time had been (a little) more grounded in the real world? Or are you simply one of those people who constantly have boring songs stuck in your head, and you'd like a little more colorful variety in your mental music videos? Perhaps you should watch STEVEN UNIVERSE! [more inside]
posted by jsnlxndrlv on May 4 at 3:24 PM - 88 comments

Make it cool or I’ll kill you

The Apocalyptic Cars of Mad Max: Fury Road
“Make it cool or I’ll kill you.” That’s what director George Miller told Colin Gibson, the production designer responsible for all the cars in Mad Max: Fury Road. Gibson did one better: he made every single one of them functional, because the desert doesn’t suffer mechanical fools lightly and CGI is bullshit."
Jalopnik covers How The Man Behind The Machines Of Mad Max Put A Hellscape On Wheels
[more inside]
posted by mcstayinskool on May 13 at 2:05 PM - 221 comments

That Whitsun, I was late getting away

Phillip Larkin was one of Britain's most famous twentieth century poets. He's probably most well known for 'This Be The Verse' (nsfw) but another notable poem was 'The Whitsun Weddings' based on a railway journey or journeys he undertook from Hull to London fifty years ago. Fellow poet Ian McMillan revisits that journey.
posted by fearfulsymmetry on May 24 at 4:08 AM - 14 comments

The Real No-Go Zone

"When you imagine France and its scenic countryside, you might think of the picturesque villages, vineyards a plenty and endless rolling green hills to drive through on a blissful summer road trip. But there’s one corner of this scenic country that no one has been allowed to enter for nearly a century, known as the 'Zone Rouge'."
posted by orange swan on May 26 at 4:46 PM - 24 comments

Oasis lost.

The lost city of Ordos The Kangbashi district, planned to accommodate a population in excess of one million, is home to a lonely 20,000 people – leaving 98% of this 355-square kilometre site either under construction or abandoned altogether.
posted by bitmage on May 24 at 9:05 PM - 38 comments

Predictability is an illusion

Havoc: A life in accidents. An essay by Australian writer Tim Winton
posted by zarq on May 22 at 7:43 AM - 10 comments

It's true because pictures

(1 + 2 + … + n)2 = (13 + 23 + … + n3) [animated GIF]
(unanimated version)
posted by Wolfdog on May 26 at 6:19 PM - 36 comments

"The map began as just a doodle."

In the summer of 1963 Jerry Gretzinger began drawing a map of an imaginary city. You can now use Jerry's Map to zoom in on any of the over 3,200 eight by ten inch panels of the original paper map, executed in acrylic, marker, colored pencil, ink, collage, and inkjet print. This short film by Greg Whitmore takes a fascinating look at the project and the artist's process, which "is dictated by the interplay between an elaborate set of rules and randomly generated instructions." [via]
posted by Room 641-A on May 26 at 5:09 PM - 2 comments

Mary Ellen Mark (March 20, 1940 – May 25, 2015)

Documentary photographer Mary Ellen Mark died on May 25, 2015 at the age of 75. Perhaps her most famous project is the documentation of the lives of homeless people in Seattle in the early 1980s, specifically Erin "Tiny" Blackwell, a 13-year-old sex worker. This Life Magazine editorial was then turned into a documentary film called Streetwise in 1984. Mary and her husband, Mark Bell, have more recently followed up with Tiny 30 years later for a successful Kickstarter campaign for a book and film to be released this later this year.
posted by girlmightlive on May 26 at 5:58 PM - 18 comments

Tanith Lee 19 September 1947 - 24 May 2015

Lee was the author of over 90 books and 300 short stories, as well as four BBC Radio plays, and two highly-regarded episodes of the BBC’s SF series Blake’s 7 (Sand and Sarcophagus). She was awarded the Lifetime Achievement Award at the World Fantasy Convention in Brighton in 2013 and the Horror Writers Lifetime Achievement Award this year, which joined her British Fantasy Award from 1980 for Death’s Master, and her World Fantasy Award for her short story “The Gorgon”.
The Sci-Fi Bulletin reports the passing away of Tanith Lee, who had been ill for some time. [more inside]
posted by MartinWisse on May 26 at 8:27 AM - 73 comments

Everything you didn't want to know about Unicode

Unicode is Kind of Insane
posted by Chocolate Pickle on May 26 at 5:17 PM - 46 comments

Dog Dancing

In a relatively unknown sport, humans and dogs dance together. Headquartered in Germany, DogDance International says it's a fast-growing dog sport. Enjoy Sandra and Lizzy dancing; she says it's the perfect sport. The 2012 world championship finalists. Two 2014 finalists, and one more with that giant fluffy dog.
posted by stoneweaver on May 26 at 6:02 PM - 26 comments

The Dom-Ino Effect

In 1914 Le Corbusier designed, but never built, an open-plan slab concrete house he caled Dom-Ino, combining domus and innovation. One was built to match the plans at the Vienna Biennial in 2014, but you can see the dom-ino philosophy in the skeletons of buildings all over: The Radical Le Corbusier Design That Shaped Italy [more inside]
posted by the man of twists and turns on May 26 at 7:30 AM - 19 comments

The Human Toll of Quiverfull

Quiverfull of shit: a Guide to the Duggars' Scary Brand of Christianity - Gawker, Jennifer C. Martin
"In 1985, a writer named Mary Pride published a book called The Way Home: Beyond Feminism, Back to Reality, which detailed her journey away from the second-wave feminism of the '70s and into what she perceived was a woman’s Biblical place in the home, and the commandment to fill the house with as many of her husband’s children as possible.

"Pride insisted that no woman could possibly find true happiness without submitting to her vision of Christianity: Relinquish control of your womb to God, and exist only to please your husband, give birth, feed everyone, and educate your children in the home—almost certainly without having received any formal higher education yourself."
posted by joseph conrad is fully awesome on May 26 at 8:42 AM - 247 comments

How to find deserving Hugo candidates?

I seriously need some helpful soul, or maybe some kind of crowd-sourced thing that can tell me what I should be reading as things come out so I’m not floundering under drifts of pages on book mountain when the Hugo nomination period opens. Preferably some recommendation engine where my fellow writers, bless you guys I love you all but damn I know how we are, are not allowed to nominate or push their own books. I don’t want reviews, I don’t even want opinions, I just want a simple but large list of titles and authors
Rachael Acks about the plight of next year's Hugo nominators looking for worthy candidates in a field in which at least 4201 new novels in English were published in 2014. [more inside]
posted by MartinWisse on May 4 at 2:02 PM - 234 comments

A Pinot Noir

“Diamonds are easier to trace than wine,” says Jason Hernandez, a former U.S. attorney who prosecuted one of the largest wine counterfeiting cases in 2013. “Even if you’re looking at something like a 1982 Château Lafite,” he says, referring to what oenophiles consider one of the best wines in the world from one of the best years, “they made 20,000 cases of that wine. How do you tell one bottle from the next?
posted by ellieBOA on May 26 at 4:32 AM - 55 comments

Ive Got A Secret

Stephen Fry announces in an exclusive interview that Jony Ive has been promoted to Apple's Chief Design Officer (CDO). Ive becomes the third C-level executive at the company, a step up from his former position as Senior Vice President of Design. Tim Cook followed up on Fry's announcement with a company-wide email detailing all of the changes to the management structure of the design department.
posted by fairmettle on May 26 at 3:29 PM - 19 comments

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