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January 26

Try to make you angles as non-euclidean as possible

Yoga Fhtagn A holistic workout were we tone our bodies while slowly losing our minds (SLYT 3d6 SAN loss)
posted by fearfulsymmetry at 8:45 AM - 7 comments

Arithmeticfilter

Nothing but an endless supply of mental arithmetic problems. Five levels of difficulty, from "10 - 6" to "√370881." [more inside]
posted by Iridic at 8:41 AM - 6 comments

100 milligrams twice a day of "shut up and deal with it"

"But here's the facts: Like most other psychiatric disorders, we are really unlikely to hurt another person. Even when we're really upset at someone, we're still convinced that it's entirely our fault, so we mostly take it out on ourselves. That's a big reason why we self-injure -- it's punishment as much as relief -- and why suicide attempts are as routine as daylight saving time for many of us."
5 Realities of Life for People With Borderline Personalities
posted by almostmanda at 8:30 AM - 20 comments

Are You Ready For Some Football?

Dear Kitten Attends a Superbowl Party. Bonus: a room full of evaporated people.
posted by longdaysjourney at 6:59 AM - 16 comments

GOOD EMAIL

Tips for crafting the perfect email subject line. [SLCH]
posted by Librarypt at 6:42 AM - 37 comments

The youth of Greece are revolting

In a functional market economy, the classic couple in a posh restaurant are young and close in age. In my travels through the eurocrisis – from Dublin to Athens – I have noticed that the classic couple in a dysfunctional economy is a grey-haired man with a twentysomething woman. It becomes a story of old men with oligarchic power flaunting their wealth and influence without opprobrium. [more inside]
posted by Hartster at 5:11 AM - 83 comments

Why you should stop relying on your phone, and buy a nice camera

Like beer and pop music, it was easy to make do with what’s cheap and available, only to look back on a life of Dave Matthews and Bud Light and wonder why I’d gotten by on “good enough.” Because I am aging, and because I have the memory of the original Tamagotchi, I am profoundly grateful to have these clear, high-resolution photos of the people I loved and love. [more inside]
posted by craniac at 3:16 AM - 75 comments

B is for Bevan and his Bogan Mates

An A to Z of Australia Day, by Sydney Morning Herald cartoonist Cathy Wilcox.
posted by acb at 1:54 AM - 14 comments

Adam Curtis's Bitter Lake.

Bitter Lake "is a new, adventurous and epic film by Adam Curtis that explains why the big stories that politicians tell us have become so simplified that we can’t really see the world any longer." [available on the UK BBC iplayer for a month] [trailer with Curtis's preview]
posted by feelinglistless at 12:52 AM - 6 comments

January 25

And Canada's most racist city is....

Maclean's brings to the forefront the dark reality faced by the country's aboriginal population. Maclean's article on Winnipeg has generated a lot of buzz in the city and beyond, and a mixed reaction. What's more, the statistics speak to those still tempted to claim the problem isn't as bad as America's race issues.
posted by xm at 10:23 PM - 15 comments

Lindy West and her troll

Former The Stranger and now GQ writer Lindy West talks on This American Life with an abusive troll who pretended to be her dead father immediately after his death. Don't let the description put you off: he apologizes, for real. [more inside]
posted by librarina at 9:58 PM - 26 comments

BaconCat, 2003-2015

MeFi's own jscalzi suffers the loss of his beloved pet. Ghlaghghee (pron. "Fluffy"), a.k.a. the world-famous BaconCat, has passed away after a brief illness. John writes a quiet, typically wry eulogy and appreciation.
posted by PsychoTherapist at 9:56 PM - 64 comments

Fingers Crossed for Next Time ROU_Xenophobe

Just Read The Instructions and Of Course I Still Love You are the names Elon Musk has chosen for the east coast and west coast SpaceX spaceport drone ships. The names are from the late Iain Banks Culture novel Player of Games, and are indicative of the attitudes taken by Culture AI spaceships in naming themselves (a full list of Culture Vessel Names may be found here) An introduction to Iain Banks on Mefi previously, and on Mefi again at his passing ("The Culture represents the place we might hope to get to").
posted by emmet at 9:56 PM - 33 comments

"They all love them some Founding Fathers"

"DES MOINES, IA – Word must have gone out early, either by word of mouth, or by all those social media platforms that conservatives have discovered since 2008, or perhaps by that strange wingnut telepathy only practiced by the true initiates who know all the conjuring words. (People could make Lois Lerner jokes secure in the knowledge that every single person in Iowa who would find them funny was somewhere in the hall.) In any case, the rhetoric at the Iowa Freedom Summit, hosted by Steve King and Citizens United, was startlingly muted. Oh, they hit all the proper notes. Liberty! Constitution! American exceptionalism! And the melodies were consistent; the first few bars were gloomy as they meandered through the many failures of the current administration, many of them largely imaginary, and then the final movement was all sunshine and rainbows and Republican promises of a brighter day. Every speech was like a Requiem Mass that concluded with a rousing chorus of 'Tomorrow.'" Charles P. Pierce of Esquire has some colorful choice words to say about the recent Iowa Freedom Summit.
posted by quiet earth at 8:33 PM - 34 comments

SS Pieter Schelte

The "world's largest ship" is named after a Nazi war criminal. Unsurprisingly a few people have a problem with that.
posted by Artw at 5:33 PM - 68 comments

British Actors, American History

“I played a soldier confronting President Lincoln in the film Lincoln, and I say to him, in the winter of 1865, ‘When are we going to get the vote?’ and then there I am, 100 years later, depicting Dr. King, alongside the very same actor, Colman Domingo — we confronted President Lincoln together — we are now in a jail cell, asking for the vote again, in 1965,” Oyelowo said in an interview with BuzzFeed News. “I’ve played a preacher in The Help, I played a fighter pilot in Red Tails, I played someone who was in a sit in, was a Freedom Rider, was a Black Panther, then goes on to be a senator in The Butler. They’re all characters that took me on this journey through what it has been to be a black person for the last 150 years.”

Oyelowo stopped, paused, and corrected himself slightly here. In nearly every role he’s taken on since he arrived in the United States, he’s portrayed the sojourn for what it’s like to be a black American for the last 150 years. [more inside]
posted by Eyebrows McGee at 5:26 PM - 6 comments

Money, privilege, luck, connections

“Sponsored” by my husband: Why it’s a problem that writers never talk about where their money comes from.
posted by naju at 4:27 PM - 94 comments

Straight Masterpiece

L. Young & Da Youngstaz get funky! An amazing a cappella version of the already amazing funktastic anthem Uptown Funk. [more inside]
posted by jammy at 1:28 PM - 30 comments

Anime Eyes

Anime Eyes with MAC- A how to.
posted by josher71 at 12:21 PM - 22 comments

Optical Illusion art of Robert Gonsalves

A massive gallery of Incredible Optical Illusion Art by Robert Gonsalves
posted by Chocolate Pickle at 12:14 PM - 15 comments

Some Girls Want Out: Spectacular Saintliness

Hilary Mantel on St. Gemma Galgani, St. Therese of Lisieux, and "holy" and secular anorexia, stigmata, and hysteria. "We can see, as ‘Catholic neurologists’ of the time did, that Gemma’s symptoms are a representational strategy. They are an art form and a highly successful one; they are also (possibly) the product of mental pain and distress turned into physical symptoms. . . . When we think of young adults in the West, driven by secular demons of unknown provenance to starve and purge themselves, and to pierce and slash their flesh, we wonder uneasily if she is our sister under the skin." (warning: gruesome) [more inside]
posted by sallybrown at 11:02 AM - 23 comments

10th Century Travels among the Norse, Bulgars, Khazars and Others

The Risala of Ahmad ibn Fadlan is a tenth century travel narrative of an emissary of the Caliph to the Iltäbär of the Volga Bulgars. He described his encounters with many peoples on his journey, but the Risala is most famous for his account of the Rus and their funeral rites, who probably were Norse people who had settled along the Volga. If these were indeed the Norse, ibn Fadlan gives one of the most detailed contemporary descriptions of the Norse before they started writing down their own stories some centuries later. He was not the only Muslim to have encounters with the Norse, as Judith Gabriel explains in Among the Norse Tribes. Another 10th Century description of the Norse was by the Jewish al-Tartushi from Al-Andalus. Michael Crichton used the Risala as the basis for his novel Eaters of the Dead, which later was made into the movie The 13th Warrior. Both book and film left something to be desired in terms of historical accuracy.
posted by Kattullus at 10:59 AM - 17 comments

"Mr. President, is you OK? Is you good? 'Cuz I wanted to know."

In addition to posting the State of the Union to Medium before the end of the press embargo, the Obama administration has delivered another sop to the young whippersnappers of today by having the president get interviewed by three stars of YouTube: comedian GloZell, designer Bethany Mota, and vlogbrother Hank Green.

You can watch the interviews, read takes on how they went from Hank Green himself, the WaPo, NPR, and the NYT, and enjoy some grousing from FOX and Bloomberg Politics's response to said grousing.
posted by Going To Maine at 10:25 AM - 20 comments

The Debt? (trigger warning)

"In an essay in the New York Times, psychiatrist Richard Friedman writes that the relationship of adults to their abusive parents 'gets little, if any, attention in standard textbooks or in the psychiatric literature.' But Rochelle is not alone. I have been hearing from people in her position for years, adult children weighing whether to reconnect with parents who nearly ruined their lives. Sometimes it's a letter writer such as 'Comfortably Numb' who has cut off contact with a parent but is now being pressured by family members, and even a spouse, to reconcile and forgive. Sometimes a correspondent, like 'Her Son,' has hung on to a thread of a relationship, but is now fearful of being further yoked emotionally or financially to a declining parent." [SLSlate] (Trigger warning for descriptions of abuse.)
posted by joseph conrad is fully awesome at 10:09 AM - 34 comments

“And all of a sudden, it’s a homicide.”

A Twist in the Murder of a 97-Year-Old Man: He Was Knifed 5 Decades Ago: [New York Times]
The New York medical examiner determined that an operation after a stabbing in the 1950s led to Antonio Ciccarello’s death in September at 97. The police have opened a murder investigation.
posted by Fizz at 9:48 AM - 23 comments

Bringing Boredom Back

Inspired by recent research on how boredom and mind-wandering contribute to creativity, public radio show New Tech City is launching a pro-boredom project. Bored and Brilliant invites participants to track how they use their phones to prevent moments of mental idleness, to try to reclaim free brain space and find oases of time, complete a week of creativity challenges, and contribute their responses to the conversation. BrainPickings' Maria Popova and artist Nina Katchadourian (who both joined the project's launch party to talk about how they"owe their careers" to boredom)and RadioLab's Jad Abumrad.
posted by Miko at 9:28 AM - 21 comments

"To change anything, start everywhere"

To Change Everything (tochangeeverything.com)
posted by jeffburdges at 7:24 AM - 35 comments

"that it ain’t no gun they can make that can kill my soul"

No other lyrics more perfectly captured the spirit bubbling under the surface of hip-hop in the latter half of 2014 than those sung in J. Cole’s cracking, raspy-voiced performance of “Be Free” on The Late Show on December 10. Clad in a “Fuck Money Spread Love” hoodie, and rocking the post-natural, 2014 version of the revolutionary ’fro, Cole used the venerable Ed Sullivan Theater as a pulpit, bringing attention to Ferguson and the #BlackLivesMatter movement. He provided an anthem for protests taking place just blocks away.
What’s Going On: Kendrick Lamar, D’Angelo, J. Cole, Kanye West, and the New Sound of Protest Music.
posted by MartinWisse at 5:49 AM - 32 comments

Fish and CHiPs all over the place

Maybe you've wondered what a Sig Alert is.
posted by bq at 5:48 AM - 23 comments

Know When To Run

Over Christmas engineering works on train lines into London failed. This is a review of the report into that failure. It's a fascinating read about cascading failure and errors in project planning. And, for once, read the comments.
posted by Gilgongo at 1:17 AM - 50 comments

Inside Amsterdam's efforts to become a smart city

Amsterdam wants to be smarter than you. And it’s well on its way. The Netherlands capital is on a mission to turn itself into the smartest city in the world. Through a collaboration with government officials, private companies including telecom giant KPN, and the Amsterdam University of Applied Sciences, the city is quickly becoming a futuristic tech hub.
posted by ellieBOA at 1:06 AM - 14 comments

January 24

Graffiti artist INSA made a massive animated GIF

A few days ago, Graffiti artist INSA made a massive animated painting in Rio de Janeiro. Over four days he painted an area of 154,774 square feet (14,379 square meters) with the help of 20 assistants. The painting states were captured by a satellite to create this GIF, the biggest ever.
posted by bobdow at 9:44 PM - 45 comments

The Household Mentoring Approach in Uganda

Household mentoring "is an innovative extension methodology used to work with poorer households. The specificity of this approach is that all adult members of a household, including both women and men farmers, are visited and assisted by a trained mentor selected from the local community. During these visits, men and women in a household learn how to better plan their livelihoods together, work together to improve their food security and income, and to share the benefits equally." [more inside]
posted by Sir Rinse at 9:02 PM - 9 comments

With fewer voices, Auschwitz survivors speak

The voices of Auschwitz. "The 70th anniversary of the liberation of the notorious Nazi concentration camp could mark the last major commemoration for many Holocaust survivors." [more inside]
posted by homunculus at 7:50 PM - 14 comments

"I don't want you to hate me, and I don't want you to disown me."

Oklahoma. This was a place where Kathryn's workplace had a cussing jar, a quarter per swear, and the words written on it, “Let Go and Let God.” Here, Christianity was the religion — Tracy and Kathryn were believers — and Oklahoma football was the religion — Tracy and Kathryn were believers — and people could be decent and kind and judgmental, sometimes all at once, which was why, when Tracy told some Rotary Club friends that she and Kathryn were getting married, she kept her eyes planted above their heads so she wouldn't have to look at their faces.
posted by Rhaomi at 7:03 PM - 69 comments

America's Angriest White Men

"A longtime feminist, Kimmel maintains a delicate balance when handling his sources. He wants to be sympathetic to the people he interviews and yet loyal to his academic principles. After a series of humbling recessions and other economic shifts, men like Rick feel emasculated and humiliated, he writes, 'betrayed by the country they love, discarded like trash on the side of the information superhighway.' Their sin, according to Kimmel, is a failure to adjust. These guys refuse to admit they’ve been handed privilege all these years by a world that puts white men on top. White men, he writes, 'have been running with the wind at our backs all these years,' and 'what we think of as ‘fairness’ to us has been built on the backs of others.' The New York Times reviews sociologist Michael Kimmel's 2013 book Angry White Men: American Masculinity at the End of an Era. [more inside]
posted by quiet earth at 6:53 PM - 67 comments

SCREAM CHOIR

I thought this was ridiculous......until I realized that Artaud might have loved it. So maybe it's great. (SLYT) [more inside]
posted by crazylegs at 6:05 PM - 16 comments

Who Owns the Copyright to Vivian Maier's Photographs?

John Maloof and Charlie Siskel’s Finding Vivian Maier is nominated for an Academy Award, Best Feature Documentary. Most people have read about the nanny who worked in complete obscurity, yet may be one of the greatest street photographers of the 20th Century. The filmmakers tell the story of her art and also track down people who knew this eccentric and perhaps troubled artist. Meanwhile, and problematically for Maloof and other owners of Maier’s work, it’s one thing to own the negatives and quite another to own copyright that allows for printing and publishing those negatives. Maloof thought he had that covered, but in 2013 that came into question. Finally and most recently (2015), perhaps sensing an opportunity for much-needed revenue, the State of Illinois has belatedly opened a file on the Maier Estate and notified owners and galleries to be prepared for legal inquiry. The documentary is streaming on the major distributors (Netflix, Amazon, GooglePlay).
posted by Short Attention Sp at 3:48 PM - 19 comments

He strives to impress his guest with a collection of blue gifts.

THE EROTIC AND SULTRY DANCE OF THE ADULT BOWERBIRD. (slyt)
posted by theodolite at 3:42 PM - 27 comments

Just how good is the flu vaccine?

Ontario's former Chief Medical Officer of Health Dr. Richard Schabas and infectious diseases specialist Dr. Neil Rau question the utility of mass, annual influenza vaccination: "Vaccines, in general, are perhaps the biggest success story of modern medicine. But in the league tables of vaccines, influenza vaccine hovers near the relegation zone."
posted by rhombus at 2:17 PM - 46 comments

An Unincorporated Historic Neighborhood Gets it Place on the Internet

Isla Vista LocalWiki From the description in mefi projects: Isla Vista has a lot of interesting characteristics that make it a good subject for a community writing project: it's an unusually walkable place with many local institutions and traditions, and it's an unincorporated quasi-town with a complex relationship with the university and the county. But one part that I find really appealing is that this is a relatively unexplored topic... [more inside]
posted by Michele in California at 2:13 PM - 9 comments

In short, in matters lexical, semantic, and homologous ...

I Am the Very Model of a Biblical Philologist. (h/t Language Log)
posted by benito.strauss at 12:27 PM - 12 comments

Token Sucking

The Kiss of Desperation: A Disgusting Practice Vanishes With the Token/A Lewis Grizzard take on the subject from 1991
posted by josher71 at 11:30 AM - 38 comments

A quick trip downtown and 30 years ago...

"All in all he "shot over 1,900 hours of tape over a period of seven years, capturing himself and his friends in the glossy façade of Manhattan's downtown life... He sought to tape all of New York's citizens, including its outcasts, striving to candidly capture their lives. He taped anything and everything that interested him—outrageous performances in bars and clubs, swinging house parties, chaotic gallery openings, park and street festivals, late-night ruminations of his friends, absurd conversations with taxi drivers, prosaic sunset walks with his dog on the then-still-existing west side piers." Sullivan died of a heart attack in 1989, just as he was preparing to produce his own cable television show." -- Nelson Sullivan's New York City.
posted by The Whelk at 11:00 AM - 10 comments

Genesis' The Lamb Lies Down on Broadway turned forty recently

The sixth Genesis studio album (and their last with Peter Gabriel), it's a two record, 94 minute conceptual monster which, "... tells of how a large black cloud descends into Time Square, straddles out across 42nd Street, turns into a wall and sucks in Manhattan Island. Our hero named Rael crawls out of the subways of New York and is sucked into the wall to regain consciousness underground." [more inside]
posted by philip-random at 10:52 AM - 34 comments

La Feria de la Alasita

Every January 24, Alasitas or La Feria de la Alasita, a fair specific to Bolivia and especially La Paz, commences. Though its origin is somewhat unclear (Spanish-language), for the next three weeks, the fair will draw Bolivians seeking material abundance ("Alasita" translates as "buy me" in Aymara) in the year ahead by buying miniatures at the fair of those things they want and giving them to Ekeko, the Aymara god of prosperity, represented by a small figurine (Spanish-language video) covered in all the goods the petitioner would like to receive. As with a number of cultural and culinary items of the region, there is some debate as to whether Alasitas is properly Bolivian or Peruvian (Google translation).
posted by the sobsister at 10:20 AM - 2 comments

Infamous. Thoughtless. Careless. Wikipedia and Gamergate. 💻

Infamous. Thoughtless. Careless. Mark Bernstein on recent editorial decisions at Wikipedia: "The infamous draft decision of Wikipedia’s Arbitration Committee (ArbCom) on Gamergate is worse than a crime. It’s a blunder that threatens to disgrace the internet." [more inside]
posted by joseph conrad is fully awesome at 9:50 AM - 255 comments

🎨💯👊

emoji.ink lets you draw with Apple emojis. [more inside]
posted by Chichibio at 8:56 AM - 16 comments

Why I Am Not a Maker

There’s a widespread idea that “People who make things are simply different [read: better] than those who don’t.” [...] It’s not, of course, that there’s anything wrong with making (although it’s not all that clear that the world needs more stuff). The problem is the idea that the alternative to making is usually not doing nothing—it’s almost always doing things for and with other people, from the barista to the Facebook community moderator to the social worker to the surgeon. Describing oneself as a maker—regardless of what one actually or mostly does—is a way of accruing to oneself the gendered, capitalist benefits of being a person who makes products. [more inside]
posted by haltingproblemsolved at 7:42 AM - 113 comments

Fishing with mosquito nets

Across Africa, from the mud flats of Nigeria to the coral reefs off Mozambique, mosquito-net fishing is a growing problem, an unintended consequence of one of the biggest and most celebrated public health campaigns in recent years. Unintended consequences and complicated trade-offs: Mosquito Nets for Malaria Spawn New Epidemic: Overfishing (SLNYT)
posted by Dip Flash at 6:35 AM - 25 comments

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