October 24

Memento Mori, a short story written and read by Jonathan Nolan

"Your wife always used to say you'd be late for your own funeral. Remember that? Her little joke because you were such a slob—always late, always forgetting stuff, even before the incident. Right about now you're probably wondering if you were late for hers." This is the beginning of Memento Mori, a short story by Jonathan Nolan, which was originally published with an Esquire article Everything you wanted to know about "Memento". Jonathan also read the story, which became the movie Memento (trailer, original 2000 era website, still online - previously, twice). [more inside]
posted by filthy light thief at 6:44 PM - 0 comments

Or you could just buy some Eggos

Stranger Things is streaming on Netflix, so just in time for Halloween, Netflix Kitchens shows you how to make French Onion Barb and Demogorgon Pie.
posted by Room 641-A at 6:07 PM - 3 comments

Native Lives Matter

The Police Killings No One Is Talking About. "Native Americans are being killed by police at a higher rate than any other group in the country - but these deaths are rarely covered in the media. Now, Native groups are organizing for justice in a growing Native Lives Matter movement." [more inside]
posted by homunculus at 3:55 PM - 12 comments

Outside man, Art does not exist

Marlow Moss was a radical lesbian who apprenticed herself to Léger and became a modernist to rival Mondrian.
She is one of the great figures of modern English art (keep Scrolling).
The first full-length academic study of Marlow Moss in English wasn't written until 2008.
posted by adamvasco at 2:14 PM - 11 comments

the suicide the nations are so elaborately preparing to commit

"A sculpted pair of figures thirty-three feet tall, on a high platform, were striding triumphantly toward the German pavilion. I therefore designed a cubic mass, also elevated on stout pillars, which seemed to be checking this onslaught, while from the cornice of my tower an eagle with the swastika in its claws looked down on the Russian sculptures. I received a gold medal for the building; so did my Soviet colleague." A story of dueling architecture at the Paris International Exposition of 1937.
posted by theodolite at 1:59 PM - 3 comments

Organic pet food? There goes the neighborhood!

GTFO: an eviction story in one Ellis Act by Kenny Keil.
posted by MartinWisse at 1:47 PM - 3 comments

sauced for the holidays: boozy infusions and DIY liqueurs

Infuse Your Booze! Don't let the gift-giving season catch you unawares; whip up a big batch of homemade liqueur this week and all you'll have to do is wait. Some of my tried-and-true favorites under the fold. [more inside]
posted by amnesia and magnets at 1:33 PM - 20 comments

This Was Your Life!

The man that Daniel Raeburn suggested was "the most widely read theologian in human history," for better or worse, has died. A report from the official social media of Chick Publications states that Jack T. Chick has passed away at the age of 92. The wide, insane, paranoid, KJV-only, anti-Catholic, anti-Masonic, anti-Semitic, and, of course, loving world of Chick's work has appeared in the finest of public transit and mall restrooms for decades. An accessible and delightful in-depth critical review of his work can be found in The Imp, available here [nsfw] as a PDF [direct link].
posted by Countess Elena at 12:42 PM - 125 comments

More fun than a barrel of monks

Roly poly Tibetan monks having roly poly fun (FB link) doing handstands badly over barrels. [more inside]
posted by nickyskye at 12:13 PM - 5 comments

The ultimate reading list, created by librarians

We asked our librarian delegates to help us build the perfect library by answering one simple question: which one book couldn’t you live without?
posted by infini at 11:41 AM - 29 comments

A Fatal Mistake

The Sinking of El Faro: On October 1, 2015, the container ship El Faro sailed directly into the path of Hurricane Joaquin. When it sank it took the lives of all 33 aboard, including eight New Englanders. Rachel Slade wanted to know what happened and why. You will not soon forget what she found.
posted by Cash4Lead at 8:39 AM - 45 comments

The Evolution of Lady Gaga

Meet her newest incarnation: Joanne. "She’s Burt Bacharach in sequined hot pants; she’s a Liza Minnelli for the Beyoncé era; she’s Streisand Spice. She projects the kind of timelessness that makes it very easy to forget that Lady Gaga is just 30, a ’90s kid trying more to be slightly more like Cole Porter than Kurt Cobain."
posted by I_Love_Bananas at 8:03 AM - 40 comments

Why Isn’t 'The Fresh Prince of Bel-Air' on Netflix?

Classic black TV shows haven’t made the jump to streaming platforms — and their window of opportunity may be closing
posted by Etrigan at 5:56 AM - 67 comments

Activist Tom Hayden has passed away

Tom Hayden, member of the Chicago Seven, one of the founders of the SDS, politician and leading anti-Vietnam War activist has passed away at the age of 76. Link to recent NPR podcast from the DNC.
posted by HuronBob at 3:56 AM - 50 comments

October 23

Cracking the Cranial Vault: What It Feels Like to Perform Brain Surgery

Dr. Rahul Jandial takes us inside the thoughts of a brain surgeon. After working on flesh and bone for 30 minutes, the real summit presented itself: the human brain, the most delicate, complex, and beautiful thing [in] the universe.
posted by pjern at 9:02 PM - 29 comments

A Book by Its Cover: The strange history of books bound in human skin

"Anthropodermic bibliopegy, or books bound in human skin," writes Megan Rosenbloom in Lapham's Quarterly, "are some of the most mysterious and misunderstood books in the world’s libraries and museums. The historical reasons behind their creation vary [...] The best evidence most of these alleged skin books have ever had were rumors and perhaps a pencil-written note inside that said 'bound in human skin'...until now." Anthropodermic biblipegy on Metafilter previously and previously. Warning: links may contain details disturbing for some. [more inside]
posted by mandolin conspiracy at 7:32 PM - 6 comments

Turn that election frown upside down with happy animals!

201 smiling animals!
posted by Room 641-A at 2:50 PM - 16 comments

Join The Black Parade: My Chemical Romance And The Politics Of Taste

[T]o toast the 10th birthday of The Black Parade, I called up two black writers whose work I adore and whose taste I admire, to have the exchange of ideas I wish I'd known how to have way back when. Here's hoping it reaches a few brown kids still learning how to trust themselves. NPR Music's Daoud Tyler-Ameen offers up a 25m audio article and an accompanying article about being black and loving My Chemical Romance's mega-hit album, released on Oct 23, 2006.
posted by hippybear at 2:45 PM - 13 comments

Like shallowly turned soil in a field...

We Salted Nannie. A small tale of ghosts and spirits both real and semi-real, and what lies buried in the past.
posted by 1f2frfbf at 12:48 PM - 19 comments

Who put Bella in the Wych-Elm (redux)

June 2016; a small cardboard sign appears by the A456 Hagley Road, near Birmingham UK. It reads 'who put Bella in the wych elm'. A few new twists have recently been added to a 73 year old murder mystery, including a connection to the last man executed in the tower of London. [more inside]
posted by AFII at 10:55 AM - 10 comments


Shelter. a collaboration between Porter Robinson, Madeon, Crunchyroll , and A-1 Productions. [more inside]
posted by zabuni at 10:49 AM - 7 comments

The 19th Century Yoruba repatriation

I hardly ever heard about the Nagô, the Afro-Brazilians, and the Lukumí, the Afro-Cubans, who returned back to West Africa. The idea that the Yorùbá people share one identity is strongly related to the transatlantic experience of the slave trade and the returnees’ influence in the homeland. This story contributes a lot to the classical discussions of what is ‘Original-Yorùbá’ and what a diaspora invention - as not even the word ‘Yorùbá’ is of ‘Yorùbá’ origin itself. I summed up the basic facts.
posted by infini at 10:20 AM - 12 comments

Who's Spending Britain's Billions?

BBC Four Documentary: Jacques Peretti explores how public bodies utilise their resources and asks whether taxpayers are getting value for money. [slyt]
posted by marienbad at 9:25 AM - 13 comments

The enigma of pre-Columbian whistling water jars

Peruvian shamanic whistling vessels. Being made out of clay archaeologists first thought these beautiful, ceramic sculptures were water bottles or toys until an amateur anthropologist explored their ritual use. One can just blow into the vessel but when water is added in one of the chambers and the vessel is rocked back and forth the shifting air creates an interesting sound pattern. [more inside]
posted by nickyskye at 8:55 AM - 10 comments

1,000 Rooms of Cute Terror

You have been invited to visit a haunted mansion owned by a ghost named Spooky. Can you survive all 1,000 rooms of jump scares? Spooky's Jump Scare Mansion is a free (Steam and Indie DB) 2.5D FPS puzzle survival horror game. Despite its cute exterior, there's more to Spooky's house than meets the eye. [more inside]
posted by codacorolla at 8:52 AM - 7 comments

"People like me just got screwed."

Short of troops to fight in Iraq and Afghanistan a decade ago, the California National Guard enticed thousands of soldiers with bonuses of $15,000 or more to reenlist and go to war. Now the Pentagon is demanding the money back. [more inside]
posted by Shmuel510 at 8:51 AM - 51 comments

"Fighting with the same two hundred people we’ve known all our lives"

Meridian 59 is one of the longest running original online role-playing games. Launched in 1996, the game was a commercial venture until 2009 and the game files were open sourced in 2012. The once massively multiplayer online game now is rarely hosting more than twenty people at a time, the last survivors of Meridian 59. [via]
posted by jessamyn at 8:31 AM - 8 comments

Good news, everyone!

Jumping spiders don't have ears—but they can still hear you coming. This may only apply to hunting spiders. However, orb weavers can control their web’s tension and stiffness to help them identify potential partners as well as prey. [more inside]
posted by Johnny Wallflower at 8:15 AM - 11 comments

GROW Cinderella

The latest game in a long running series of classics has just been released! No, not that one. Why not spend ten minutes playing the latest GROW game, GROW Cinderella.
posted by Rinku at 5:32 AM - 13 comments

Predicting Hearthstone decks

Google researcher Elie Bursztein leads their anti-abuse research team. He sometimes posts articles of extreme interest to game players and computer security people. Such as using machine learning to predict Hearthstone decks: Part 1 - Part 2 - Part 3. His list of publications leads to a wealth of interesting information, for people of various technical inclinations! [more inside]
posted by JHarris at 3:08 AM - 18 comments

October 22

Double Arrow: British Rail Corporate Identity from 1965–1994

This is a website about the British Rail Corporate Identity from 1965–1994 which includes a wealth of digitised examples of British Rail design material collected over several years. I hope you find it useful and inspiring, whether you're a practitioner or historian of graphic design, a scale modeller or simply a connoisseur of corporate design at its aesthetically satisfying best.
posted by jack_mo at 10:17 PM - 16 comments

Artist Steve Dillon has died

Artist and co-creator of the comic book Preacher, Steve Dillon, has died at the age of 54, his brother announced today on Twitter. Dillon was best known for his artistry on Preacher from Vertigo Comics, and the Punisher from Marvel Comics, both written by Garth Ennis. Some of his art can be seen here (not Dillon's tumblr).
posted by skycrashesdown at 7:43 PM - 43 comments

(Or is it rivers basin?)

A visualization of the river basins of the continental United States
posted by Rhomboid at 6:40 PM - 36 comments

"Unexpected item in bag"

Howard Schneider was a doctor treating psychiatric patients in the ER when he decided to transform the grocery store experience. He set out to invent the self checkout machine (partial transcript here). Schneider's self-checkout kiosk was first deployed at a Price Chopper supermarket in Clifton Park, New York in 1992. [more inside]
posted by mandolin conspiracy at 6:21 PM - 74 comments

Yo pipsqueaks!

What Makes a New York City Kid?
posted by strelitzia at 4:45 PM - 12 comments

♫Ain't no boogers out tonight♫

It’s kind of an old southern version of hide and seek. One of our favorite old fashioned kids games was a game we played at night. It was one of our “scary” old fashioned outdoor games, called “ain’t no boogers out tonight.” Never heard of it, huh? It’s kind of an old southern version of hide and seek. One person is the “booger” (monster, villain). The booger hides, and the rest of the kids try to find him. They travel around in the dark in a gang, chanting, “Ain’t no boogers out tonight; Granpa shot ‘em all last night.” Once the booger is discovered, he tries to catch as many kids as he can before they can return safely to base.
posted by ND¢ at 4:35 PM - 60 comments

"an approach to the technique the Homeric singers used"

Homeric Singing - An Approach to the Original Performance is the website of Professors Georg Danek and Stefan Hagel. There they have a five minutes of their educated best guess of how ancient Greek bards would have sounded like, singing the epics of Homer accompanying themselves on a phorminx. [via Open Culture]
posted by Kattullus at 3:31 PM - 11 comments

“It is a good time to be an asset ‘in play.’”

AT&T Agrees to Buy Time Warner for More Than $80 Billion [The Washington Post] “AT&T’s ambitious move to acquire Time Warner for more than $80 billion, which the Wall Street Journal first reported could be announced as soon as Saturday, would singlehandedly turn America’s second-largest wireless carrier into a content powerhouse and one of the most prominent TV, film and video-game producers in the world. AT&T and Time Warner did not immediately respond to requests for comment.” [more inside]
posted by Fizz at 12:38 PM - 56 comments

Delicious in any language

The PBS documentary series "The Migrant Kitchen" explores Los Angeles’ booming food scene through the eyes of a new generation of chefs whose cuisine is inspired by the immigrant experience. The filmmakers visit the kitchens of those who have transformed the culinary landscape of the city, combining traditional ethnic cuisines and a fusion of new flavors and techniques. Ep 1: Chirmol: How a Guatemalan Tradition Journeyed to an American Menu; Ep 2: Barkada: L.A.’s Exploding Filipino Food Movement; Ep 3: Mercado: Artisanal Street Food & L.A.'s Best Mole; Ep 4: Loghmeh: Whole Animal Roasts & Middle-Eastern Culinary Traditions; Ep 5: Banchan: Korean Food Beyond BBQ. [Scroll down the pages for related background and recipes.]
posted by Room 641-A at 12:06 PM - 9 comments

Cheating at poker James Bond Style

A Defcon 2016 talk about a very sophisticated hi-tech gadget designed to cheat at cards.
posted by Foci for Analysis at 11:25 AM - 23 comments

The 30 Weirdest Horror Movies of the 1970s

"The 1970s produced acclaimed horror films like The Texas Chainsaw Massacre, The Exorcist, Jaws, Carrie, and Halloween. But the decade also unleashed cinematic oddities galore, most of which were low-budget entries that gleefully pushed the boundaries of good taste. You say “cult movie”—we say “essential.”" (io9)
posted by valkane at 10:54 AM - 81 comments

"Anime fandom has a cultural resistance to critique"

I have a lot of friends who used to watch anime but don’t anymore, partly because, like me, it became too hard to seek out anime that treated women well. There are also lots of people who are enthusiastic about other geek properties but won’t touch anime because of its reputation of infantilizing women and sexualizing children. It makes it hard to recommend anime to people who aren’t already fans.
Amelia Cook on the need for more feminist criticism in anime. [more inside]
posted by MartinWisse at 7:09 AM - 77 comments

R.I.P Hannah

Dogs are too amazing to let go, but sometimes it happens and they will forgive you.For about two months Hannah has been having seizures, they were small and nothing to worry about, but they gradually got worse. (Alternate link) [more inside]
posted by Johnny Wallflower at 6:44 AM - 36 comments


posted by eyeballkid at 12:05 AM - 182 comments

October 21


Couple Encounters a Black Metal Band in Woods During Engagement Shoot
posted by Artw at 9:17 PM - 47 comments

Ed Motta - Japanese City Pop Mix Vol. 2.

Brazilian musician, Ed Motta, created a good mix of Japanese 70s-80s AOR music titled: Japanese City Pop Mix Vol. 2. [more inside]
posted by gen at 6:31 PM - 12 comments

You will not go to Mars today

Dr Casey Handmer (homepage) gave a talk last month to the Mars Society about why getting humans to Mars will be really hard. He's also written a much more detailed analysis.
posted by moonmilk at 4:40 PM - 52 comments

Bill Bowen, R.I.P.

A major figure in higher education has passed. William G. Bowen was president of Princeton, head of the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, and helped launch a variety of projects, including JSTOR, Artstor, and Ithaka Harbors. 2012 winner of the National Medal of Arts and National Humanities Medal, Bowen also found time to write nineteen books, many influential, often on higher education.
posted by doctornemo at 4:28 PM - 11 comments

Donald Glover is your new Lando Calrissian

Confirming months of speculation, the official Star Wars Twitter account has announced that Community and Atlanta star Donald Glover has been cast as smooth-talking space pirate Lando Calrissian in Disney’s upcoming Han Solo film.
posted by misterbee at 4:04 PM - 90 comments

McLuhan, Massage, Film

This Is Marshall McLuhan: The Medium Is The Massage [54m] is a well-done little-known film put out in conjunction with his well-known book The Medium Is The Massage: An Inventory Of Effects [pdf page includes download link] and the cult album The Medium Is The Massage: with Marshall McLuhan [41m]. [more inside]
posted by hippybear at 3:21 PM - 27 comments

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