May 29

"So what's Nintendo," you ask, "and why should I care?"

John Stossel on 20/20 in 1988: Nuts For Nintendo
posted by Pope Guilty at 11:53 PM - 8 comments

Miniature Origami Robot Self-folds, Walks, Swims, and Degrades

Origami Robot Folds Itself Up, Does Cool Stuff, Dissolves Into Nothing [yt] - "At ICRA 2015 in Seattle yesterday, researchers from MIT demonstrated [yt] an untethered miniature origami robot that self-folds, walks, swims, and degrades. That's the title of their paper [pdf], in fact, and they delivered on all of those promises: from a flat sheet with a magnet on it, their robot folds itself up in just a few seconds, is immediately ready to zip around on land or water driven by magnetic fields, and then when you've run out of things to do with it, drive it into a tank of acetone and it'll dissolve. This is the first time that a robot has been able to demonstrate a complete life cycle like this, and eventually, it'll be doing it inside your body." (via; previously)
posted by kliuless at 11:42 PM - 6 comments

You don’t just live with art, you live in art.

In Seattle, Xenia is not only a "one bedroom in Eastlake", it's an Airbnb art installation you can rent for a $100 a night.
posted by ShooBoo at 10:42 PM - 7 comments

"If I should feel that I’d like a few drags, it’s just gotta be alright"

The secret reefer tapes of Louis Armstrong
posted by flapjax at midnite at 10:12 PM - 4 comments

" It’s hard for people to understand the value of their own stuff."

The Myth Of The Maxxinista [more inside]
posted by the man of twists and turns at 9:47 PM - 7 comments

Children's Letters to Frankenstein

Dear Jennifer, I very much appreciate your letter of 10/29. From the wording of one of your questions, I suspect that the message may have been intended for my monster, "Frankenstein's Monster." I have included his address, should you wish to contact him (the monster) directly.
posted by moonmilk at 8:07 PM - 14 comments

FREMDAJ EN LA NOKT

But the final item on the meeting’s agenda underscored what all those virtual Esperantists were missing. After the speeches, Neil got up and passed out sheets printed with the lyrics to "Fremdaj en la Nokt," the Esperanto version of the Sinatra hit "Strangers in the Night." He explained that a particular Italian Esperantist had an extensive YouTube presence and a habit of jumping into worldwide Esperanto forums and Facebook groups to plug his singing. This was one of his better songs. Neil settled back down behind his banquet table, counted out the time, and the eight attending members of the New York Esperanto Society started to sing.
posted by growabrain at 8:04 PM - 6 comments

Sometimes a JB is not enough to get us to a JTB...

A tough way to lose a poker tournament when you go all in for millions of dollars.. (slyt)
posted by SpacemanStix at 8:02 PM - 23 comments

House of Secrets

When the refurbishment is complete, Witanhurst will have about ninety thousand square feet of interior space, making it the second-largest mansion in the city, after Buckingham Palace. It will likely become the most expensive house in London. In 2006, the Qatari royal family bought Dudley House, on Park Lane, for about forty million pounds; after a renovation, its estimated resale value is two hundred and fifty million pounds. Real-estate agents expect that the completed Witanhurst will be worth three hundred million pounds—about four hundred and fifty million dollars.

And no one knows who owns it.
posted by Chrysostom at 7:31 PM - 20 comments

/vərˈbōs/

From plitter to drabbletail: a few writers choose the words they love. [The Guardian] [Books]
Dialect terms such as yokeymajig or whiffle-whaffle; all-time favourites like cochineal, clot or eschew; antiquated phrases such as ‘playing the giddy ox’ … leading writers on the words they cherish.
[more inside]
posted by Fizz at 6:23 PM - 24 comments

GOOGLE WAKA FLOCKA 2016

I'm Waka Flocka Flame, and I approve this message.
posted by not_on_display at 6:19 PM - 11 comments

Castle Griffinsteed

Castle Griffinsteed: What horrors lie beneath?
posted by saladin at 5:33 PM - 4 comments

Man Bites Dog/Dog Bites Man

Jimmy Stewart chews on the scenery. Scenery chews on Jimmy Stewart. [more inside]
posted by bq at 5:10 PM - 15 comments

John McAbery Sculptures

Hand Carved from solid blocks of wood.
posted by Confess, Fletch at 4:16 PM - 7 comments

"the means, and the proper means, of fulfilling our destiny..."

"Vivid Sydney is an 18 day festival of light, music and ideas bringing Australia's Emerald City to life as winter approaches. This year Vivid began on 22 May and finishes on 8 June. Just for once, I'll let my camera do the talking..." Example of a light show on the Customs House (YouTube, Doctor Who 50th Anniversary). [more inside]
posted by joseph conrad is fully awesome at 3:42 PM - 3 comments

Space is big. Space is dark. It's hard to find. A place to park.

Soyuz docking with the ISS. A dashcam view from TMA-16M. Blue Danube waltz not included. (SLYT)
posted by bitmage at 3:36 PM - 22 comments

Dick pics are mundane and funny to me

Cobra Club ... the newest game by developer Robert Yang, doesn’t just feature dicks: the game is fundamentally about dicks, how they look, and the many ways people try to make them look good. Yang’s previous games have had the fortune of being picked up by major YouTubers, meaning that millions of gamers around the world are familiar with his work. But Yang doesn’t feel comfortable with the way in which some YouTubers treated his creations. “[Cobra Club] is more ‘direct’ in response to all these dudes playing my abstract gay sex innuendo games and saying ‘this is so gay! eww’…basically, when people are being homophobic and gross, the proper response is to be even gayer at them,” Yang told me.
[more inside]
posted by frimble at 3:05 PM - 15 comments

Fishy

The Piscivore's Dilemma On sustainable seafood (Tim Zimmerman for Outside magazine)
posted by box at 1:56 PM - 16 comments

Pinball pushers: crews of tinhorns, living in luxury on penny thievery

In the long history of pinball machines, a new golden age of pinball was started with the introduction of player-controlled electronic flippers, first seen in 1947 in D. Gottlieb & Co's Humpty Dumpty. Unfortunately, this was five years after the start of the War on Pinball, ushered in by New York Mayor Fiorello LaGuardia and others who saw pinball machines simply as another form of coin-machine gambling (PDF) and source of moral decline. Following New York, pinball bans spread throughout the United States (PDF) and Canada, with fears escalating to the point that some in criminal law looked to alternative solutions to the Pinball Problem (PDF). Even though a bold "Babe Ruth" move by Roger Sharpe in New York City in May of 1976 overturned the local ban and other cities again followed suit, some local pinball bans have only recently recently been lifted, after people discovered such laws were still in place. See also: Pinball: From Illegal Gambling Game to American Obsession (VICE short documentary).
posted by filthy light thief at 1:50 PM - 12 comments

“It never ... Not even once ... ever works”

Cameron Crowe's new movie Aloha got its first bad review when Amy Pascal's emails were hacked. "I'm never starting a movie again when the script is ridiculous," she wrote. "I don't care how much I love the director and the actors." This was before anyone got wind that this was the latest of in long, disgraceful history of movies set in Hawaii that erase POC from a location where the population is only around 30% Caucasian. But as Jen Yamoto points out in The Daily Beast, "Aloha actually features one of the more prominent Asian/mixed heritage female leads in any studio movie in recent memory. She just happens to be played by Emma Stone." [more inside]
posted by Gin and Broadband at 1:37 PM - 56 comments

How an acrobat fell to her death during a live performance.

Life and Death at Cirque du Soleil
posted by zarq at 1:29 PM - 14 comments

Cracking the (Guitar) Code

Troy Grady a guitarist who grew up in the '80's worked to discover the techniques used by speed guitarists like Yngwie Malmsteen, Eric Johnson, Steve Vai and Eddie Van Halen. In Cracking the Code (Season 1 and Season 2), he goes through his struggles and successes in figuring out how to chunk patterns, pick slanting and sweeping and unlock the riffs of these masters. Unlike typical presentations, his feature clever throwback animations that illustrate technique with a German expressionist style. Outside the series, he also discusses the art of transcription in deconstructing Steve Vai's "Intimidation Lick" from Crossroads.
posted by plinth at 1:24 PM - 15 comments

Franklin W Dixon Didn't Exist?

OK, I actually knew that, although I didn't realize that anonymous authors were still cranking out Hardy Boys (and Nancy Drew) books.
posted by COD at 12:42 PM - 42 comments

What I post, I post.

The game is the game, what's done is done, and it is what it is.
The Wire: Tautology Supercut [SLYT, NSFW]
posted by Room 641-A at 12:42 PM - 19 comments

Custom saw blade for quick boxes and drawers

Andrew Klein demonstrates his custom saw blade designed for quickly making boxes and drawers. There's also a photo gallery if you want to skip the video.
posted by Nonsteroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drug at 12:34 PM - 26 comments

Filming everyday life near the end of the Soviet Union

Former TV cameraman Rick Suddeth has posted numerous videos of everyday life in the former Soviet Union in the 1980s and early 1990s. These are mostly raw footage or lightly edited, some are silent. Moscow traffic ca. 1986. Moscow grocery store ca. 1990. Universam Department Store, Moscow, 1990. Queuing for wine at a state liquor store. In the Cosmos Night Club. [more inside]
posted by Rumple at 12:32 PM - 16 comments

Star Wars: Clone Wars

Looking for something to watch this weekend? Why not try the Star Wars: Clone Wars microseries-compiled-into-a-movie from 2003.
posted by curious nu at 12:00 PM - 24 comments

These Chimps Helped Save Human Lives: Now We've Left them to Die

In 1975, the New York Blood Center (NYBC) decided to bring 100 chimpanzees to Liberia to conduct research on hepatitis and other human diseases. The research worked: we now have a vaccine for hepatitis B, and the research project ended in 2005. But NYBC left the chimps in Liberia, promising that they could retire there and be cared for until the natural end of their lives. In March 2015, NYBC abruptly ended funding for the chimp sanctuary. The chimps are slowly starving to death, dependent on the charity of unpaid caregivers for food and fresh water. NYBC says they have no legal or moral obligation to help. [more inside]
posted by decathecting at 11:19 AM - 40 comments

Actually, I have no idea what a blue corn moon is.

Judy Kuhn sings ‘Colors of the Wind’ in different styles and talks about her eleven o'clock number in "Fun Home" (Fun Home previously)
posted by roomthreeseventeen at 11:07 AM - 5 comments

STOL, not stall

Bush pilots in Alaska rely on planes that can get them in and out of just about anywhere that has a bare patch of ground. During the off-season, they (and pilots from around the rest of the US) meet up for the annual Valdez Fly In. [more inside]
posted by backseatpilot at 11:05 AM - 19 comments

SoX -- Surf

Chance the Rapper and The Social Experiment's new album Surf is available as a free download at his home page here, or iTunes.
posted by lkc at 10:45 AM - 15 comments

Internet journalism and invasive surveillance

Quinn Norton is selling you out
posted by The Devil Tesla at 9:30 AM - 31 comments

Less Marc Jacobs More Jane Jacobs

Why is one of the most desirable neighborhoods in NYC full of shuttered storefronts?
posted by The Whelk at 8:50 AM - 136 comments

"More indigenous territory has been claimed by maps than by guns"

Jordan Engel's Decolonial Atlas project aims to restore indigenous place names to global maps overwritten by colonialism. On Tumblr too.
posted by Miko at 7:48 AM - 24 comments

Meet Addy

In 1864, a nine-year-old slave girl was punished for daydreaming. Distracted by rumors that her brother and father would be sold, she failed to remove worms from the tobacco leaves she was picking. The overseer didn’t whip her. Instead, he pried her mouth open, stuffed a worm inside, and forced her to eat it. This girl is not real.
posted by ChuraChura at 7:25 AM - 47 comments

Joining the Maroons

Did Alice Goffman commit a felony? (From Ethics On the Run) [more inside]
posted by anotherpanacea at 7:00 AM - 36 comments

Lose Yourself, Win the Internet

We've seen good ASL versions of Eminem before, but this one from Shelby Mitchusson takes it to another level. (SLASLYT)
posted by ericbop at 6:16 AM - 11 comments

Why we need paternal leave and a new mindset about dads

The New Republic interviews Josh Levs, a CNN reporter who "has written a book, All In: How Our Work-First Culture Fails Dads, Families, and Businesses – and How We Can Fix It Together, arguing that it is incumbent on men to become part of a conversation about gender equality in homes and in workplaces." [more inside]
posted by John Cohen at 5:09 AM - 60 comments

From Kinshasa

‘Tired of pre-conceptions around African music, Mbongwana Star are creating their own identity, fusing traditional Congolese rhythms with post punk and electronics inspired by life in the townships around them, “making magic out garbage”’—some tracks on YouTube: Malukayi (ft. Konono No. 1); Shégué; Nganshe; Kala. You can listen to their debut album From Kinshasa in full on Soundcloud (some reviews 1, 2, 3). [more inside]
posted by misteraitch at 3:18 AM - 5 comments

Skyping with the enemy

A French journalist posed online as a young woman interested in Isis, she was soon contacted by a fighter in Syria. Could she maintain a double life?
posted by Admira at 12:55 AM - 13 comments

New Wave Goodbye

'New Wave Games Journalist' and frequent Guardian and Rock Paper Shotgun columnist Cara Ellison is leaving games journalism, and she lays out her reasons in an essay on her site. Some of her best-known writing includes her S.EXE series about sex in a games for Rock Paper Shotgun, a verse review of an Anna Anthropy game for The Guardian, the Embed With Games series and a heartfelt tribute to indie game maker Increpare.
posted by Charlemagne In Sweatpants at 12:21 AM - 24 comments

Why isn't this a proper Disney series?

What with Disney owning Marvel, you'd think they'd found a way to crossover all their various princesses by now. Until they finally do, have all your Disney princesses needs met with Amy Mebberson's Pocket Princesses.
posted by MartinWisse at 12:16 AM - 9 comments

May 28

How many partners have you been with? Can you remember everyone?

Tell us how many people you’ve slept with. Our calculator will tell you if that’s a lot. Slate features a sex history calculator. Input your age, gender (male or female) and number of sex partners since 18 and compare results with other participants.
posted by zardoz at 9:52 PM - 243 comments

The world's most elaborate prison football league

Luzira was once the most notorious prison in Uganda. Now it’s home to what is surely the world’s most elaborate prison football league. "Upper Prison has kept itself busy with extraordinary ingenuity. The prisoners have created their own drama, they dance, and they play music on homemade instruments. There is prayer and counselling in the church and mosque. But more popular than anything else is football. Within the prison there are 10 football clubs, some of them almost two decades old, each with their own players, boards and constitutions. Alongside Moses’s old team Aston Villa, there is Liverpool and Manchester United, Everton and Chelsea, Arsenal and Newcastle United."
posted by all the versus at 9:51 PM - 3 comments

John Oliver: Part of the problem.

Jacobin mag: John Oliver Should Be More Like Mad Max. [spoilers]

LorenzoAE: John Oliver isn't Mad Max: He's Part of the Problem.
"Oliver isn’t going to be Mad Max, nor will he be Howard Beale, Eugene Debs, or Spartacus. He’s going to be John Oliver—an employee of the Time Warner media empire who’s valued highly enough as a corporate asset to make millions of dollars a year. If he or any other celebrity threatened the corporate bottom line rather than serving it, he wouldn’t have his own show, he’d be stuck writing media criticism for free on a WordPress site. If that isn’t obvious, then someone needs to read more Chomsky and watch less John Oliver."
posted by anemone of the state at 9:40 PM - 86 comments

Or Rewrite History! (DuckTales ... woo-ooo!)

Single Ladies ft. DuckTales [more inside]
posted by Eyebrows McGee at 7:42 PM - 17 comments

The Best Band You've Never Heard Of

Tell Me Do You Miss Me - A Film About Luna is a strangely fascinating 2006 documentary about the indie band's 2005 farewell tour. It often seems more like a vacation souvenir home video than a documentary, surprisingly intimate and personal, with obvious affection, tension and rehashing of old arguments between band founder Dean Wareham and guitar player Sean Eden. Surprisingly open and honest, it's a slice of life we rarely get to see, we're so used to tour films being about really famous bands, not smaller bands who may be able to make a living from their music, but who are only going to make money on tour if they sell enough merchandise (that gets lost by the airline). Really worth a watch, and available in its entirety on YouTube. [more inside]
posted by biscotti at 6:14 PM - 32 comments

Kung Fury

If you love kung fu and hate Nazis, then today is your lucky day. Kung Fury has been released on Youtube. (Previously, Previously)
posted by rebent at 5:41 PM - 53 comments

50 States of Gray... or should that be Grey?

With the finals of the National Spelling Bee about to begin (on ESPN, streaming may not be available to you), "Vocativ and Google Trends were eager to demonstrate just how accomplished these youngsters are", so they compiled a list of the most spellchecked words in each of the 50 United States and D.C. (NOT in map format)
posted by oneswellfoop at 4:08 PM - 61 comments

Consciousness Began When the Gods Stopped Speaking

How Julian Jaynes’ famous 1970s theory is faring in the neuroscience age.
The picture Jaynes paints is that consciousness is only a very thin rime of ice atop a sea of habit, instinct, or some other process that is capable of taking care of much more than we tend to give it credit for. “If our reasonings have been correct,” he writes, “it is perfectly possible that there could have existed a race of men who spoke, judged, reasoned, solved problems, indeed did most of the things that we do, but were not conscious at all.”
[more inside]
posted by modernserf at 4:06 PM - 72 comments

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