183 posts tagged with 1970s.
Displaying 1 through 50 of 183. Subscribe:

have guitar will travel

"There was rock music in Zimbabwe (then Rhodesia) in the 70s?" [more inside]
posted by Potomac Avenue on Jun 30, 2016 - 3 comments

“Contact resident film archivist Alex Cherian if you have any questions”

Established in 1982, the [San Francisco Bay Area Television Archive] preserves 6000 hours of newsfilm, documentaries and other TV footage produced in the Bay Area and Northern California from the Twentieth Century. We are a part of the J. Paul Leonard Library’s Department of Special Collections and oversee material owned by local TV stations KPIX-TV, KRON-TV, KQED and KTVU. All 1,659 items in the collections can be streamed. A few notable inclusions within. [more inside]
posted by Going To Maine on May 18, 2016 - 5 comments

Those 70s Shows

Every 70s Movie: The Best, The Worst, The Weirdest, and Everything in Between. A new review a day since October 2010.
posted by MoonOrb on May 13, 2016 - 39 comments

"Antiques Roadshow" Mistakenly Values High School Art Project at $50,000

In the mid-1970s, Betsy Soule, an Oregonian high school student, sculpted a trippy jug out of clay. In 2015, it was mistaken for a 19th century "grotesque face jug." "It’s bizarre and wonderful," says the appraiser, Stephen L Fletcher. "You even see a little bit of, like, Pablo Picasso going on here. It’s a little difficult to identify precisely when this was made, but I think it’s probably late 19th or early 20th century."
posted by Miss T.Horn on May 10, 2016 - 38 comments

With Paul Lynde as Admiral Motti

A very Donny and Marie Star Wars
posted by Mchelly on May 5, 2016 - 18 comments

As seen on TV

Phillip Kives, the founder of K-Tel International, has passed away at age 87. (previously) [more inside]
posted by Rob Rockets on Apr 28, 2016 - 19 comments

Recycle Nixon. Stop Kissing Pig Ass.

The University of British Columbia hosts an online collection of 250 anti-war and other posters from the Berkeley student movement, dating between 1968 and 1970. [more inside]
posted by Rumple on Apr 7, 2016 - 17 comments

Now that's magic

Paul Daniels, internationally renowned magician and television performer, has died aged 77 after a diagnosis of an inoperable brain tumour in late February 2016. [more inside]
posted by NordyneDefenceDynamics on Mar 17, 2016 - 32 comments

Funky Nassau

The name of this band is The Beginning Of The End. The Bahamas, 1970s. Three brothers and a friend, two albums of junkanoo-influenced funk: [more inside]
posted by Orange Dinosaur Slide on Mar 11, 2016 - 6 comments

I sang it in Iceland, in Greenland, England, Germany, in Czechoslovakia

Marlene Dietrich, live in London, 1972 (SLYT 1:13:00)
posted by The Whelk on Mar 10, 2016 - 4 comments

Why don't you dance with me? I'm not no limburger!

Oh it's time to do 'em right. Early concert footage of The B-52's. Hey now, don't that make you feel a whole lot better? Stream The B-52's Live! 8-24-1979. They do all 16 dances: [more inside]
posted by Orange Dinosaur Slide on Jan 25, 2016 - 26 comments

Celebrating the Polyester Decade

Space 1970 :: Journey with us back to the days when special effects were created by skillful hands and spaceships were detailed models, when robots were obligatory comedy relief, when square-jawed heroes and cloaked villains battled among the stars -- and the future was fun!
posted by anastasiav on Jan 7, 2016 - 37 comments

Habibi Funk

Fadoul et Les Privileges, Morocco's answer to James Brown.
posted by ChuraChura on Jan 4, 2016 - 6 comments

I Presume You Mean Computers And So Forth?

"I found this collection of outtakes in my archive. I shot these interviews on the streets of New York in the late 70s when I was doing a documentary on the coming of the information age." - Man on the street interviews with New Yorkers in 1979 about science, technology, corporate influence, computers, and paperwork. (SLYT 5:45)
posted by The Whelk on Sep 23, 2015 - 17 comments

Ladies and Gentlemen, This is Tom Jones

Courtesy of Turkish YouTube user Burç Arda Gül, highlights from This is Tom Jones, a variety show that ran on ATV in the UK and ABC in the US from 1969-1971.
Raise Your Hand, with Janis Joplin
Delta Lady, with Joe Cocker
Medley, with Stevie Wonder
Any Place I Hang My Hat Is Home, with Tony Bennett
I Walk the Line, with Johnny and June Carter Cash
Hard to Handle, with some enthusiastic audience members.
posted by Horace Rumpole on Aug 15, 2015 - 30 comments

Zee! Ee! Arr! Oh! Zee! Ee! Arr! Oh!

Ryan Richardson has recently digitised and made available the entire run of Slash, an LA punk magazine, which ran from 1977 to 1980. [more inside]
posted by frimble on Jul 7, 2015 - 13 comments

Rainbows, Signposts, Secrets, Rewards, Panorama, Fiesta

The Houghton Mifflin Readers (1971): Textbook Illustrations that Blew a Million Minds. Vintage textbook graphics, from covers to poetry to illustrations.
posted by maryr on Jul 6, 2015 - 34 comments

The Texas Instruments TMX 1795: the first, forgotten microprocessor

In the late 60's and early 70's, the technology and market were emerging to set the stage for production of monolithic, single-chip CPUs. In 1969, A terminal equipment manufacturer met with Intel to design a processor that was smaller and would generate less heat than the dozens of TTL chips they were using. The resulting design was the 8008, which is well known as the predecessor to the x86 line of processors that are ubiquitous in desktop PC's today. Less well known though, is that Texas Instruments came up with a competing design, and due to development delays at Intel, beat them to production by about nine months. [more inside]
posted by ArgentCorvid on May 11, 2015 - 17 comments

"We're gonna be a great TV star."

In the pilot episode... Welles goes beard to mustache with Burt Reynolds on the Constipation School of Acting, does magic tricks with Angie Dickinson and discusses the cosmic importance of puppetry with Jim Henson. It’s all coated with Welles’ eccentricities and indecipherable profundity. Once again, it’s impossible to know whether he’s genuinely bizarre or wholly self-aware of the display he’s putting on. My money is always on the latter.
To celebrate the 100th anniversary of his birth, please enjoy the bizarre and wonderful never-aired 1979 pilot of The Orson Welles Show. (Via)
posted by Atom Eyes on May 6, 2015 - 12 comments

Margret: Chronicle of an Affair – May 1969 to December 1970

The briefcase was found three decades after the affair took place. The contents of the suitcase: an extraordinary collection of found materials that chronicled the adulterous relationship between a businessman and his secretary in the late 1960s and 70s.
posted by ChuraChura on Mar 31, 2015 - 61 comments

"Activate Electra-Change!"

The 1970's Batman parody Electra Woman and Dyna Girl. is being rebooted (again) with YouTube stars Grace Helbig and Hannah "My Drunk Kitchen" Hart in the title roles. [more inside]
posted by zarq on Feb 27, 2015 - 27 comments

"A fetishized nostalgia for the 1970s and early '80s"

​​​​They Say Art Is Dead in New York. They're Wrong. – Alan Feuer, NYT ​(December 2014):
Somehow, in the last few years, it has become an article of faith that New York has lost its artistic spirit, that the city's long run as a capital of culture is over. After all (or so the argument goes), foreign oligarchs and hedge-fund traders have bought up all the real estate, chased away the artists and turned the bohemia that once ran east from Chumley's clear across the Williamsburg Bridge into a soulless playground of money.

Last year, the foremost proponent of this doomsday theory was the rock star David Byrne, who complained in The Guardian that artists, as a species, had been priced out of New York. This year, others joined him. The novelist Zadie Smith lamented in October, in The New York Review of Books, that the city's avant-garde had all but disappeared. The musician Moby wrote a comparable essay in February, describing how creative types are fleeing New York and referring to his former home, accurately but narrowly, as "the city of money." Just a couple of weeks ago, Robert Elmes, the founder of the Galápagos Art Space in Brooklyn, declared the indigenous "creative ecosystem" was in crisis — so, naturally, he was moving to Detroit.
posted by joseph conrad is fully awesome on Jan 17, 2015 - 64 comments

Gritty, not glossy: 70s films

"Why were American movies so much better in the 1970s than in the decades since — and most of the decades before? Simple. Our movies then were not as inhibited by censorship (self-imposed) as they were prior to the '60s.

"And they were not as obsessed with huge box office grosses and commercial values as they became afterward — following the stunning financial success of those two '70s superhits, 'Jaws' (1975) and 'Star Wars' (1977). Instead, during most of the '60s and '70s — liberated both by the collapse of the old studio system strictures and by the greater acceptance of film as art from critics and audiences — American filmmakers of all generations, from Martin Scorsese ('Mean Streets') and Hal Ashby ('Harold and Maude') to Sidney Lumet ('Dog Day Afternoon') and Mike Nichols ('Carnal Knowledge') to Alfred Hitchcock ('Frenzy') and Billy Wilder ('Avanti'), tried things they wouldn't have dared in the decades past. More often than not, they succeeded." (Michael Wilmington, Chicago Tribune) [more inside]
posted by joseph conrad is fully awesome on Dec 5, 2014 - 285 comments

"I will not tolerate any rotten rockabillies in my employ."

Memos from Bear Cave. Inspired by the 1970s memos of perpeptually apoplectic Edward "Tiger Mike" Davis ("I am not fond of hippies, long-hairs, dope fiends, or alcoholics"), SomethingAwful writers created a series about the manliest CEO in the 1970s soup-manufacturing industry. While Tiger Mike is hard to top, the saga of JD Boruff, who swims in his own soup and monitors his employees' toilet flushes, takes on a strange and hilarious charm as its universe expands.

There are eighteen epistolary stories in the series to date, indexed below the fold. [more inside]
posted by rorgy on Nov 15, 2014 - 2 comments

Very 70s Halloween tv specials. How very? Paul Lynde and KISS very.

Some 70s television programming for your Halloween viewing pleasure:
posted by Room 641-A on Oct 30, 2014 - 21 comments

That New Costume Smell

If you were a child in the 70s who dreamed of being Boss Hogg or an 80s baby desperate to be a Rubik’s Cube, your dream could come true for less than $5. For that was the Golden Age of Ben Cooper and Collegeville Costume. Relive their glory days by perusing some vintage catalogs. [more inside]
posted by jrossi4r on Oct 23, 2014 - 61 comments

Taking the '70s more seriously

Style Gone Wild: Why We Can't Shake the 1970s

Collectors Weekly: What prompted such radical changes in popular fashion?

Lutyens: One reason was that people in the West were becoming increasingly affluent, and this gave young people the confidence to question their parents’ values. Because they had money, they could be more independent. Society was also becoming much more liberal as well because you had things like the legalization of homosexuality and the legalization of divorce. People were allowed to be themselves more without being judged by other people.

Then the three main minority movements — feminism, black civil rights, and gay liberation — all these minorities had been marginalized until the late ’60s. In the ’70s they began to assert themselves more and become more visible. So their style became more visible, and it influenced mainstream fashion.
[more inside] posted by joseph conrad is fully awesome on Oct 17, 2014 - 61 comments

"You Hockey Puck!"

Don Rickles roasts Jerry Lewis (and gets slapped in the face by Milton Berle) A few other roasts: Sammy Davis Jr. Ronald Reagan Barry Goldwater Red Foxx Jonathan Winters roasts Johnny Carson Jackie Gleason Jimmy Stewart [more inside]
posted by Nevin on Oct 12, 2014 - 19 comments

If it ain't broke, break it: the unspoken motto of The Kinks

"HH [Henry Hauser]: Ryan and Nina are right on target. The Ray-Dave sibling rivalry sparked many of The Kinks' most spontaneous (and brilliant) musical moments. The Storyteller, Ray's riveting account of early life in the Davies household and his band’s rise to prominence, has him describing how he and Dave exchanged scornful looks while recording "You Really Got Me". The elder Davies swears that if you listen closely, you can actually hear Dave yelling "Fuckkkoffff" right before his guitar solo. Ray salvaged the track by covering up Dave's profane exclamation with his own unscripted outburst ("Owwwww noooooo!"), and the impromptu rock scream turned into one of the most memorable quirks in Kinks history. It perfectly captures the animalistic agony that accompanies hopeless infatuation. Without the Ray-Dave rivalry, it would never have happened."

Henry Hauser, Ryan Bray, Nina Corcoran, and Stevie Dunbar at Consequence of Sound hold a round-table discussion in "Dusting 'Em Off: The Kinks – The Kinks". [more inside]
posted by joseph conrad is fully awesome on Oct 7, 2014 - 28 comments

Hey Kids, What Time Is It?

Ladies and Gentlemen, Buffalo Bob Smith: Live at The Fillmore East (1971)
posted by jonmc on Oct 6, 2014 - 10 comments

"The Odd Couple" at UCLA, 1971

Jack Lemmon and Walter Matthau speaking at UCLA 12/1/1971 (audio with rotating pictures, 45 min 25 sec) [SLYT]
posted by joseph conrad is fully awesome on Oct 2, 2014 - 5 comments

the foreign players who lit up English football in the 1970s and 80s

There are many foreign players in English football today, but back in the 70s and 80s there were only a few. Some became club legends, others had disappointing spells with their club. This Daily Mail article has lots of lovely 70s and 80s style pictures of many of these players, including Ardilles, Grobelaar, and, of course, a young Alex Sabella.
posted by marienbad on Sep 15, 2014 - 4 comments

1970s footballers at home

With the English Premier League season heading into its second week, The Guardian took the opportunity to publish a strange series of pictures from photographer Ray Wright of some of the top footballers of the 1970s posing at home with their families and a few choice possessions such as vacuum cleaners, radios, moving boxes, tricycles, wallpaper, axes and globes.
posted by salishsea on Aug 22, 2014 - 23 comments

A look back at the funky, psychedelic, soulful 70s in Nigeria

According to the Daptone Gold compilation liner notes (auto-playing music, click on "Biography"to read the notes), written by Pitchfork contributor Douglas Wolk, "the world capital of soul" has moved from the US ("between Memphis and Detroit, with occasional stopovers in New Orleans, Cincinnati and elsewhere") in the 1960, to Lagos in the 1970s, then it went into hiding, finally reappearing in Brooklyn, with Daptone Records. Let's go back - why Lagos in the 1970s? [more inside]
posted by filthy light thief on Aug 18, 2014 - 10 comments

"Older respondents reported hopping on railway cars and stealing gin"

The shortening leash on American children: We heard a lot about sneaking out, petty theft, amateur arson, drugs, and sexual experimentation from our older respondents. But as time passes, the picture of childhood looks a lot less wild and reckless and a lot more monitored. We asked parents how they would react if they caught their kids doing what they had done as kids. A typical response: "I'd probably freak out and turn my home into a prison."
posted by scody on Aug 6, 2014 - 165 comments

"Capturing scenes of others 'not making it' as well"

Hollywood Streets, 1979-1983 "I went to Hollywood to 'make it', but didn't, and ended up taking pictures of Hollywood, capturing scenes of others 'not making it' as well."
posted by scody on Jul 31, 2014 - 22 comments

Columbo himself was never this stylish.

Columboldies is a tumblr featuring furniture/clothing/etc. from the tv show Columbo.
posted by Room 641-A on Jul 22, 2014 - 31 comments

Muskrat Love: "Every time I sing this song, I think of Henry Kissinger"

Toni Tennille informed an audience that she and the Captain performed Muskrat Love at the dinner in honor of Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II (PDF) as part of the Bicentennial celebrations at the White House, much to the intrigue and/or confusion of Henry Kissinger. Though there doesn't seem to be any video of the performance, there is some photographic evidence (description of photos (PDF)). The Gerald R. Ford Presidential Library and Museum tumblr has a post on the event, with a higher quality image of Captain and Tennillee in action. For better or worse, there aren't any people in muskrat-type costumes to be seen.
posted by filthy light thief on Jul 5, 2014 - 31 comments

Does anyone remember laughter?

This song (based on the literature of Tolkien) will change your life. Almost Famous - Stairway to Heaven - Deleted Scene. [more inside]
posted by philip-random on Jun 8, 2014 - 58 comments

Shorthand for a long-gone era, groovy religion and journeys into space

Norman Greenbaum discusses the creation and ongoing popularity of 'Spirit in the Sky'
posted by paleyellowwithorange on May 30, 2014 - 50 comments

There's no place like [home].

Hello, [insert tv market name]!! A collection of the ‘Hello News’ package produced by Gari Communications, sold to various TV networks, nationwide (and Australia.) Hello Bonus 1: Florence Warner sings “Hello Nashville” live, accompanied by the Nashville Symphony Orchestra. Hello Bonus 2: The Osmonds record a “Hello Utah” promo.
posted by Room 641-A on May 11, 2014 - 15 comments

I'm from Tennessee, and...I just don't know

A report on the Fiorucci store, New York, c.1979
posted by mippy on May 2, 2014 - 24 comments

Brushed chrome details and a shag carrying case.

ALT/1977 is a series of advertising mock-ups which imagines modern products with the aesthetics and production of 1970s consumer electronics. Faux-wood paneling, angular fonts, and more orange than you can shake a stick at.
posted by codacorolla on Apr 17, 2014 - 60 comments

The Brie People

It's 1976 and CBS reports on NYC's hot new pickup spot: the department store Bloomingdale's
posted by The Whelk on Feb 27, 2014 - 29 comments

La-La Land

Vintage Los Angeles is Alison Martino's YouTube channel featuring a look back at Los Angeles during the 40s, 50s, 60s, and 70s. There's an accompanying blog and a facebook page, too.
posted by Room 641-A on Feb 5, 2014 - 10 comments

Shearer/Nixon

"Harry Shearer is best known for providing the voice of Mr Burns in The Simpsons and as Derek Smalls in spoof rock band Spinal Tap. His next role sees him take on former US president Richard Nixon in a series based on the disgraced politician behind closed doors... To borrow from Sir David's opening line - the following conversation was recorded by the BBC and these are the words actually spoken by Shearer and edited only for time." - The Beeb interviews Harry Shearer on his new role as Nixon.
posted by marienbad on Jan 30, 2014 - 22 comments

Vintage audio equipment blog

AUDIOKLASSIKS | HIFI VINTAGE OF THE 60's & 70's [more inside]
posted by zamboni on Jan 13, 2014 - 31 comments

Would you believe...

What do you need to be an international CONTROL super spy fighting the forces of KAOS? A Shoe-Phone. A Cone of Silence. A Bulletproof Invisible Wall and a Laser Blazer. Then, and only then, can you Get Smart. [more inside]
posted by zarq on Dec 16, 2013 - 52 comments

Boot Boy

Skinhead Farewell a BBC documentary on the controversial cult novelist James Moffat aka Richard Allen
posted by fearfulsymmetry on Dec 10, 2013 - 12 comments

Interview with Robert Dennis, composer for 1970s Sesame Street segments

"Milk" is one of the most strange and powerful episodes to come out of the Children's Television Workshop. It is impossible to imagine this film being made now. Here's the pitch:
Yeah… Jim. Look, I thought we would show how milk gets made with no script and no dialogue. Yeah. Let's just go shoot footage of farmers and the milk truck, maybe throw in a crying baby and some weird, monotone music crafted by some composer who likes jazzy stuff played by a chamber ensemble. Sunny day? Nah. Let's not make it cheerful or happy. We should make it gloomy and unsettling. Oh, and Jim? To do it right, we need some crane shots, a huge decal for the truck, and about four and a half minutes running time.
Read on, for an interview with Robert Dennis, composer of Milk and other clips (including Cow Feeding and the Mad Painter series of shorts).
posted by filthy light thief on Nov 15, 2013 - 118 comments

Page: 1 2 3 4