660 posts tagged with Africa.
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12 hours of light, 24 hours of dark

Ghana has one of the highest rates of access to electricity in Africa - and yet experienced 159 days of rolling blackouts last year. For Ghanaians, this causes all sorts of problems. Al-Jazeera English explores the dumsors: the electricity outages leaving Ghana in the dark. [more inside]
posted by ChuraChura on Sep 25, 2016 - 8 comments

'A welcome rebuke to dead white men'

A century in the making, and now completed by Britain’s David Adjaye, the Smithsonian’s gleeful, gleaming upturned pagoda more than holds its own against the sombre Goliaths of America’s monument heartland.
Preparations are in full swing for a historic opening on 24th September 2016 when America's first president of African heritage will ring an equally historic bell. Related.
posted by infini on Sep 23, 2016 - 19 comments

The largest refugee camp in the world, Dadaab in Kenya, 25 years old

While the International Court of Justice in The Hague takes up a dispute between Kenya and Somalia over maritime oil and gas reserves this week, Human Rights Watch alleges that Kenya's plan to close the Dadaab refugee camp complex, amidst protest from Somalia, violates the UN's 1951 Refugee Convention, which requires that repatriation of refugees must be voluntary. Earlier this year Kenya's Interior Ministry announced that the camp, covering 50 km² (20 mi²) and home to nearly 300,000 people, would be closed by November. Ground was broken to construct the earliest portions of Dadaab in October 1991 by the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees as a temporary measure to aid Somalis fleeing from their country's civil war, but as the years passed the site became home to refugees from other conflicts and to refugees from drought and famine, at its height holding more than half a million people. [more inside]
posted by XMLicious on Sep 20, 2016 - 12 comments

Archaeology is my activism

“These people performed a critique of a brutal capitalistic enslavement system, and they rejected it completely. They risked everything to live in a more just and equitable way, and they were successful for ten generations."
The Great Dismal Swamp straddles the Virginia-North Carolina border. From the 1600s to about the American Civil War it was a place of refuge, largely for escaped African and African-American slaves, and an important link in the underground railway. [more inside]
posted by Rumple on Sep 6, 2016 - 16 comments

Globalization is ancient

Mapping the Mercantilist World Economy Our current globalized capitalist world economy was built on Mercantilist foundations, put in place in the first phase of global European expansion, the second phase being that of the formal European empires of the industrial age. In the case of the “New World” in the Americas, Europe’s Mercantilists were creating entirely new trade networks and hinterlands. In the Old World of Afro-Eurasia however, Europe was rearranging the existing, much older, world economy it had been part of since the Middle Ages. I wanted to illustrate this first phase of global capitalism with thematic maps.
posted by infini on Aug 22, 2016 - 13 comments

“A building heavy with secrets"

In 2005, junior Harvard historian Caroline Elkins's controversial first book, Imperial Reckoning: Britain's First Gulag, resurfaced the history of Britain's brutal internment camps for the ethnic group the Kikuyu, believed to be supporters of the 1950s Mau Mau rebellion in Kenya. She then found herself working for survivors of the camps in a landmark case seeking reparations from the British government. The plaintiffs were aided by the stunning discovery at the time of their case of massive archives--1.2 million files worth--held in illegal secrecy by the Foreign Office which included files systematically removed from former colonies as the British withdrew. (Note: many of these links contain descriptions of violence against civilians.) [more inside]
posted by praemunire on Aug 20, 2016 - 24 comments

Our show is 100 percent African

“An African City” features music from Ghanaian hip-hop artists like Jayso, chic home décor from Ghanaian interior designers highlighted in detail on the show’s Instagram page, and clothing from fashion designers like Christie Brown, Archel Bernard, Kiki Clothing, Osei-Duro and Afrodesiac. The vibrant colors and pop patterns have been the toast of the series, especially as members of the African diaspora have begun to incorporate kente cloth crop tops into their wardrobes and wear traditional patterns to big events like prom. Vogue cannot get enough of them. Previously
posted by infini on Aug 18, 2016 - 2 comments

The Tanzanian wives

​In the Mara region of northern Tanzania, Abigail Haworth discovers an empowering tribal tradition undergoing a modern revival
posted by Joe in Australia on Aug 7, 2016 - 7 comments

Life and Loss in South Sudan

In the public hospital in Maiwut, a town 400 kilometers north-east of the capital, Juba, doctors and nurses work around the clock to help those in need. ... Health facilities and critical services like water and electricity are often disrupted or destroyed completely. The hospital in Maiwut is basic. The only available electricity comes from diesel-powered generators that occasionally cut out, a fact of life that can prove deadly. [more inside]
posted by Bella Donna on Jul 27, 2016 - 5 comments

Lest we forget

European refugees in India, Africa and the Middle East
During World War II in Europe over 40 million refugees sought shelter away from the catastrophic bloodshed that engulfed the continent for over six years.
posted by infini on Jul 26, 2016 - 12 comments

The Dromedaries take the field!

"It is said that every new nation or groups making claims to nationhood needs to have a national football team, otherwise you may as well not exist in the first place. The late historian Eric Hobsbawm once declared: “The imagined community of millions seems more real as a team of eleven named people. The individual, even the one who only cheers, becomes a symbol of his nation himself.” So, in the absence of recognition by formal political bodies, recognition by the Fédération Internationale de Football Associated (FIFA)—which is larger than the United Nations—can be a boon in struggles for political self-determination." Now Western Sahara is trying some football diplomacy of their own.
posted by ChuraChura on Jul 24, 2016 - 8 comments

The Sudans Takeover

As South Sudan tries to restabilize after the shaky resolution of the 2013 civil war, The Guardian turned over their African coverage to Sudanese and South Sudanese journalists to talk about more than just violence. [more inside]
posted by ChuraChura on Jul 22, 2016 - 5 comments

78rpm records from Africa

From Alger to Antananarivo – A selection of 78rpm records from Africa A Mixcloud mix.
posted by OmieWise on Jul 14, 2016 - 6 comments

100 African Writers of SFF - Part One Nairobi

An African writer who makes mix tapes of game soundtracks. A Nairobi filmmaker with Nietzsche on his smart phone. A chess champion who loves Philip K Dick. An African SF poet who quotes the Beatniks… meet the new New Wave in Nairobi, Kenya. Part one of our series 100 African Writers of SFF.
posted by infini on Jul 14, 2016 - 4 comments

Globalization before Its Time: Kutchi traders

The Arabian Sea has a special place in Indian business history. For centuries the cities and settlements on the Arabian Sea littoral traded with each other, exchanging Indian textiles for horse, armaments, pearls and ivory. In turn, some of the textiles were passed on to the Atlantic slave trade in Africa as a medium of exchange, or sent overland to European markets. Coastal merchants* indigenous to the region bordering the sea engaged in this business and developed sophisticated systems of banking and shipbuilding to support the mercantile enterprise. The Hindu and Muslim traders of Kachchh were examples of such groups of people. text via [more inside]
posted by infini on Jul 8, 2016 - 7 comments

Long read essay on Africa

Africa In The New Century
An essay by the Cameroonian philosopher and post-colonial theorist Achille Mbembe. Entitled “Africa In The New Century”, the essay advances one of the most profound arguments yet for the growing—if still marginalised—hypothesis that the future of humanity is being subsumed by the future of Africa.
text via
posted by infini on Jul 7, 2016 - 15 comments

"skinny white muzungu with long angel hair"

Actress and writer Louise Linton wrote the book In Congo's Shadow, excerpted in an article titled How my dream gap year in Africa turned into a nightmare. Apparently it was plagued with inaccuracies and outright lies, and Zambian twitter dragged the "delusional white woman" with the hashtag #LintonLies. [more inside]
posted by AFABulous on Jul 5, 2016 - 102 comments

African and African American Studies: Introduction to Wakanda

"T’Challa emerged as the fictional representation of those countless dreams denied; the unbroken manhood that Ossie Davis famously invoked after the assassination of Malcolm X. Wakanda symbolized the dreams of black utopias like Ethiopia and South Africa that had grown as the Black Freedom Struggle grew over the twentieth century. In this moment when superheroes become a way to explore contemporary anxieties about activism and authority, the Black Panther provides an opportunity for global audiences to study the traditions of black nationalism, Pan-Africanism, and the variety of African indigenous cultures. Dr. Walter Greason (Monmouth University) took a few minutes to suggest a collaborative exploration of these influences" in the Wakanda Syllabus.
posted by ChuraChura on Jun 19, 2016 - 6 comments

Mumford and Sons meet Baaba Maal, Beatenberg and The Very Best

Arena-folk rockers Mumford and Sons toured in South Africa earlier this year, where they took two days to record new music. The result is their Johannesburg EP (YT playlist with live and studio tracks), with Senegalese singer and guitarist Baaba Maal (documentary playlist), South African pop trio Beatenberg (playlist of live videos), and the team of Malawian singer Esau Mwamwaya with British production/DJ duo Radioclit as The Very Best (their original mixtape). More music from the collaborators inside. [more inside]
posted by filthy light thief on Jun 18, 2016 - 9 comments

Bera, ek Club Sandwich aur ek Chota Peg lao, jaldi!

If you ever had the dal tadka or the Club Sandwich and wondered who to thank, you may want to look at our Colonial Rulers and their second big gift: the Dak Bungalow.
More on colonial food from the British Raj. Recipes. Old recipes. Controversy in Portland. What came back Home. Comparisons. Hang on, deliciousness aside, what is a Dak Bungalow?
posted by infini on Jun 12, 2016 - 7 comments

The Curious History of “Tribal” Prints

How the Dutch peddle Indonesian-inspired designs to West Africa. [more inside]
posted by Blasdelb on May 27, 2016 - 10 comments

I am told that people kill albinos and chop their body parts.

In / Visibility - "They have not been registered at birth.
Similarly, they do not die, rather, they 'vanish.' There are no graves of albinos in cemeteries — people would come and steal the bones."
.
In neighbouring Malawi, the UN warns Witchcraft Superstitions could lead to 'Total Extinction' for Albinos.
Last Year Tanzanian albino children mutilated for use in witchcraft received treatment in the US. Progress is slow combatting violence and discrimination.
(Previously 1; 2. and the quote - dated 1950)
posted by adamvasco on May 5, 2016 - 12 comments

When my anger is expressed through dance

When my anger is expressed through dance. [more inside]
posted by ChuraChura on May 5, 2016 - 6 comments

Farewell to a Congolese music legend

One of Africa's most well known and influential musicians, and an international style icon, Congolese singer Papa Wemba died suddenly during a performance in Abidjan, Ivory Coast, on April 24, at age 66. Aside from the video clips contained within this NPR obituary, I'd recommend the entertaining feature film from 1987 starring Papa Wemba, La Vie est Belle.
posted by flapjax at midnite on Apr 28, 2016 - 15 comments

Do the Kenyan hustle and the Nigerian hip twirl

“Many of the Africans entrepreneurs I encounter represent the elite of their society,” Burfield told me. “They have received world-class educations, but aren’t interested in following in the family business. When combined with members of the African diaspora starting to return home, and ex-pats looking for the big new problems to tackle, most people would be amazed by how many entrepreneurs I encounter in Africa did their undergrad in great institutions around the world, or are self-taught from online courses and hackathons here. These are world-class entrepreneurs.
posted by infini on Apr 14, 2016 - 7 comments

When The Corporations Exploiting 3rd World People Are Also 3rd World

The face of corporate exploitation in the third world is increasingly local, and thus even more invisible than usual. Most land in Africa is technically owned by "local chiefs," and bribery and collusion between chiefs, state and corporations are dispossessing huge numbers of rural families of their land, health and livelihoods.
posted by blankdawn on Apr 12, 2016 - 5 comments

Wakaliwood!

the DIY action film studio from the slums of Uganda that took over the Internet and made it plausible for anyone in the world to become an East African kung fu movie commando. [more inside]
posted by Hypatia on Apr 7, 2016 - 5 comments

Comes highly recommended by the Lagosians

Is Lagos the Most Dangerous Party City on the Planet?
posted by infini on Mar 27, 2016 - 44 comments

Basics

Wikimedia and Facebook have given Angolans free access to their websites, but not to the rest of the internet. So, naturally, Angolans have started hiding pirated movies and music in Wikipedia articles and linking to them on closed Facebook groups, creating a totally free and clandestine file sharing network in a country where mobile internet data is extremely expensive.
Vice
posted by infini on Mar 24, 2016 - 56 comments

Beyond the languages I claim as my own

Jalada, a pan-African writer's collective, has just published their first Translation issue. Thirty three writers from across fourteen African countries came together to create this work of art, an entire issue showcasing a previously unpublished story by Ngugi wa Thiong’o. (Previously) [more inside]
posted by infini on Mar 22, 2016 - 7 comments

The mighty medieval capital now lost without trace

This is the story of a lost medieval city you’ve probably never heard about. Benin City, originally known as Edo, was once the capital of a pre-colonial African empire located in what is now southern Nigeria.
From the Series : Stories of cities
posted by adamvasco on Mar 18, 2016 - 23 comments

Nigerian Army couple who are both generals

How we met, married and coped with war
posted by infini on Mar 14, 2016 - 3 comments

8,000 vintage Afropop songs, streaming online

An amazing treasure trove of 8,000 Afropop tracks. The British Library just released this archive as part of their first online sound project within their Endangered Archives Programme (EAP). The recordings are from the state-supported Syliphone label and were released between 1958 to 1984. [more inside]
posted by nickyskye on Mar 8, 2016 - 24 comments

Chubiiline

5th-grader Nigerian-American Ify Ufele channeled the bullying she got for her size towards designing and making Chubiiline, a line of plus-size fashion with African influences.
posted by divabat on Feb 14, 2016 - 15 comments

Imperial History and Film Culture

Having fallen down the rabbit hole of British colonial cinema history, I thought to share some of the wonderful discoveries with you.
posted by infini on Feb 9, 2016 - 3 comments

Red Africa

The Calvert Journal's Special Report: Red Africa: When international socialism met the developing world [more inside]
posted by the man of twists and turns on Feb 6, 2016 - 6 comments

Ninja Eagle on Stilts - The Secretary Bird

Secretary birds can be found striding through the grasslands of sub-Saharan Africa. They cut a striking and unmistakeable profile, with light grey bodies, black wing tips and shorts, a red mask, and a crest of black quills. The latter, according to one dubious-sounding hypothesis, look like the quill pens that secretaries once tucked behind their ears—hence the bird's name. A more plausible alternative is that “secretary” is a bastardization of the Arabic “saqr-et-tair” for “hunter bird.” [more inside]
posted by narancia on Jan 26, 2016 - 12 comments

By Wambui Mwangi

Silence Is a Woman
posted by infini on Jan 15, 2016 - 4 comments

The Preservation Of A Nation

Robbie Judkins visits Tanzania to witness first hand the attempt to save a quarter of a century of musical history from oblivion. Listen to an exclusive mix of tracks newly digitized by the Tanzania Heritage Project
posted by infini on Jan 13, 2016 - 5 comments

Habibi Funk

Fadoul et Les Privileges, Morocco's answer to James Brown.
posted by ChuraChura on Jan 4, 2016 - 6 comments

Selling Solar Like Cellphones

The Solar Company Making a Profit on Poor Africans
posted by StrikeTheViol on Dec 31, 2015 - 22 comments

Goodnight, gorillas!

Sleepy gorillas make their nests in Kahuzi-Biega National Park. You can visit these gorillas by going on a virtual gorilla trek in Democratic Republic of Congo!
posted by ChuraChura on Dec 22, 2015 - 9 comments

Radical Acceptance in the Pearl of Africa

Cleopatra Kambugu was outed as a trans woman following the passage of extremely punitive anti-gay bills in Uganda. She, her boyfriend, and her family are the subject of a series of short documentaries about life in East Africa for openly LGBTQI individuals. "I was born here - a land with beautiful mountains and deep dark forest - a country blessed with diversity in ethnicity, gender, flora and fauna. Yet in all this richness, as a people and as a nation, we still struggle to recognize and appreciate this diversity." links and videos contain some disturbing transphobic and homophobic rhetoric and violence. [more inside]
posted by ChuraChura on Dec 17, 2015 - 4 comments

Outsourcing, exploitation and the new reality of work

As you read this story you will recognise that the economic system that continues to keep black people very, very poor in this country has been broken for so long, and the private sector has been so strong for so long, that we have a vast imbalance that has been allowed to flourish unchecked. We the people have not been demanding when it comes to scrutiny of corporate conduct. [...] This story – this one you will read about Coca-Cola - is part of a rich canon. It exists because of First and Gqabi and Nxumalo and Jaffer and countless others.
via [more inside]
posted by infini on Dec 10, 2015 - 2 comments

Polly-glots

Hundreds of languages are spoken in Nigeria - so which one do you teach a parrot?
posted by ChuraChura on Dec 2, 2015 - 22 comments

You won't get a better collection of AfroSFF

Nigerian AfroSFF writer Wole Talabi shares links to his favourite 10 short stories of 2015 with a short intro.
posted by infini on Nov 29, 2015 - 11 comments

South African Safari time lapse

Gorgeous time-lapse video of South Africa and its wildlife. [more inside]
posted by mudpuppie on Nov 20, 2015 - 14 comments

“Rain the Color of Blue With a Little Red in It”

"A revolutionary story of guitars, motorcycles, cell phones – and the music of a new generation” is how director Christopher Kirkley describes his West African re-imagining of Purple Rain. Set in the Saharan city of Agadez in Niger, Akounak Tedalat Taha Tazoughai (Akounak for short) is a visually sumptuous and musically thrilling movie that works splendidly with or without the Purple Rain mythos. But riffing on Prince’s tale locates Purple Rain’s universal heartbeat
posted by infini on Nov 15, 2015 - 10 comments

The Chanel of Africa

As the main supplier of fashion prints to nearly half a continent, the textile company has continued to dominate that fashion scene there for almost 170 years. How’d that happen? Rooted in European colonialism and a testament to African ingenuity, creativity, and cultural pride; it’s a surprising story
posted by infini on Oct 30, 2015 - 28 comments

The biggest raise our mothers will ever receive

On Friday, South African university students achieved a historic victory; after a week's protest they ensured there would be no fee increases at universities in 2016. This has been led by women. [more inside]
posted by infini on Oct 24, 2015 - 9 comments

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