Join 3,572 readers in helping fund MetaFilter (Hide)

7 posts tagged with America by y2karl.
Displaying 1 through 7 of 7.

Related tags:
+ (201)
+ (137)
+ (133)
+ (98)
+ (74)
+ (60)
+ (58)
+ (40)
+ (40)
+ (37)
+ (37)
+ (35)
+ (32)
+ (31)
+ (30)
+ (30)
+ (28)
+ (28)
+ (28)
+ (26)
+ (26)
+ (25)
+ (23)
+ (23)
+ (23)
+ (22)
+ (21)
+ (21)
+ (21)
+ (20)
+ (20)
+ (17)
+ (17)
+ (17)
+ (16)
+ (16)
+ (15)
+ (15)
+ (15)
+ (15)
+ (14)
+ (14)
+ (14)
+ (14)
+ (14)
+ (13)
+ (13)
+ (13)
+ (13)
+ (13)
+ (13)
+ (13)
+ (12)
+ (12)
+ (12)
+ (12)
+ (12)
+ (12)
+ (12)
+ (11)


Users that often use this tag:
zarq (51)
Artw (40)
tellurian (35)
reenum (34)
chunking express (25)
Brandon Blatcher (14)
homunculus (11)
kliuless (11)
matteo (9)
East Manitoba Regi... (8)
the man of twists ... (8)
y2karl (7)
anastasiav (7)
jason's_planet (7)
Blasdelb (7)
owillis (6)
amberglow (6)
mr_crash_davis (6)
empath (6)
hadjiboy (6)
Rhaomi (6)
The Whelk (6)
Wordshore (6)
MiguelCardoso (5)
kirkaracha (5)
nthdegx (5)
goodnewsfortheinsane (5)
infini (5)
gerryblog (5)
philip-random (5)
languagehat (4)
semmi (4)
Kattullus (4)
luser (4)
mathowie (4)
feelinglistless (4)
mapalm (4)
nickyskye (4)
Miko (4)
bardic (4)
klangklangston (4)
dersins (4)
unliteral (4)
Postroad (3)
cell divide (3)
stbalbach (3)
skallas (3)
KevinSkomsvold (3)
nofundy (3)
Voyageman (3)
dejah420 (3)
jonson (3)
Sticherbeast (3)
phrontist (3)
Gyan (3)
blue_beetle (3)
troutfishing (3)
XQUZYPHYR (3)
leotrotsky (3)
plep (3)

On The New American Militarism - How Americans Are Seduced By War

The argument I make in my book is that what I describe as the new American militarism arises as an unintended consequence of the reaction to the Vietnam War and more broadly, to the sixties... If some people think that the sixties constituted a revolution, that revolution produced a counterrevolution, launched by a variety of groups that had one thing in common: they saw revival of American military power, institutions, and values as the antidote to everything that in their minds had gone wrong. None of these groups — the neoconservatives, large numbers of Protestant evangelicals, politicians like Ronald Reagan, the so-called defense intellectuals, and the officer corps — set out saying, “Militarism is a good idea.” But I argue that this is what we’ve ended up with: a sense of what military power can do, a sort of deference to the military, and an attribution of virtue to the men and women who serve in uniform. Together this constitutes such a pernicious and distorted attitude toward military affairs that it qualifies as militarism.
An interview with Andrew Bacevich, international relations professor and former Army colonel, and author of The New American Militarism: How Americans Are Seduced by War--and here is a review. Recently by Bacevich: We Aren't Fighting to Win Anymore - U.S. troops in Iraq are only trying to buy time.
posted by y2karl on Feb 21, 2005 - 37 comments

America, Right Or Wrong - An Anatomy of American Nationalism, Fallujah & The Faces of The Fallen

A Conversation with Anatol Lieven, Senior Fellow, Carnegie Endowment for Peace and author of America, Right Or Wrong - An Anatomy of American Nationalism, of which The nationalism thing is a review. In related March Of Folly news, Letter From Iraq: Out On The Street by Jon Lee Anderson with accompanying interview How Iraq Came Undone. At one bottom line: The Faces of The Fallen.
posted by y2karl on Nov 14, 2004 - 4 comments

The Spook Who Sat By The Door - 30 years later.

The Spook Who Sat By The Door, a movie pitched and marketed as blaxploitation, was a low budget political science fiction thriller about black revolution in urban black America based upon the novel written by Sam Greenlee. It was withdrawn two weeks after its release in 1973, ostensibly at the behest of the FBI. Some remember it fondly, while others revile it in recollection. Thirty-one years later, it has been released on DVD. Sam Greenlee's an interesting man--another book of his, Baghdad Blues, is evidently an autobiographical novel based upon his first hand experience of the 1958 Baath coup in Iraq. Side notes: Researching this post led me to the intriguing Chicken Bones. And here is Elvis Mitchell's take on The Marginalization of Black Action Films.
posted by y2karl on Jan 20, 2004 - 6 comments

A flood of red ink

A flood of red ink This time the turnaround will be much tougher. There will be no “peace dividend” from the end of the cold war (indeed, the pressure on military spending may continue to increase). America is unlikely to see another stockmarket bubble, with its surge in tax revenues. As baby-boomers retire, the pressure from entitlement spending will be more acute. Set against this background, the path back to a sustainable fiscal policy will be extremely painful, even without any dramatic fiscal crisis. Long after Dubya is back on his ranch, Americans will be trying to recover from the mess he created.
posted by y2karl on Nov 6, 2003 - 35 comments

About one of every 143 U.S. residents was in the federal, state or local custody at year's end.

Study Finds 2.6% Increase in U.S. Prison Population The nation's prison population grew 2.6 percent last year, the largest increase since 1999, according to a study by the Justice Department. The jump came despite a small decline in serious crime in 2002. It also came when a growing number of states facing large budget deficits have begun trying to reduce prison costs by easing tough sentencing laws passed in the 1990's, thereby decreasing the number of inmates. The key finding in the report is this growth, which is somewhat surprising in its size after several years of relative stability in the prison population, said Allen J. Beck, an author of the report. U.S. Prison Population Grew 2.6% in 2002. The country's prisons, jails and juvenile facilities held 2,166,260 persons at the end of last year, the Justice Department's Bureau of Justice Statistics (BJS) said in a report released today. Prisoners in 2002 Abstract
posted by y2karl on Jul 28, 2003 - 19 comments

Gone To Croatan: Runaway Slaves, Lost Tribes, Tri-Racial Isolates & Hi, Iconomy!

In the late 18th or early 19th century a group of runaway slaves and serfs fled from Kentucky into the Ohio Territory, where they inter-married with Natives and formed a tribe - red, white & black - called the Ben Ishmael tribe. The Ishmaels (who seem to have been Islamically inclined) followed an annual nomadic route through the territory, hunting & fishing, and finding work as tinkers and minstrels. They were polygamists, and drank no alcohol. Every winter they returned to their original settlement, where a village had grown.

But eventually the US Govt. opened the Territory to settlement, and the ~official~ pioneers arrived. Around the Ishmael village a town began to spring up, called Cincinnati. Soon it was a big city. But Ishmael village was still there, engulfed & surrounded by "civilization." Now it was a ~slum~.


Maroons, Ramapaughs, Jackson Whites, the Moors of Delaware, Melungeons, the Ben Ishmaels--hat tip to Footnotes of History on that last--Red Bones, Brass Ankles, Turks, Lumbees, Croatans and other lost tribes and rebel slave communities.

The questions raised are what is race, tribe and family ...among others.

Included by extension are Hakim Bey, The Moorish Orthodox Church, various tribes of Black Indians, Jukes, Kallikaks, Margaret Sanger, The Bell Curve and Heather Locklear. (Step within the tent for the latter's interpetive dance)
posted by y2karl on Nov 15, 2002 - 38 comments

The First Eight Presidents of the United States of America

John Hanson (November 5, 1781 - November 3, 1782), Elias Boudinot (November 4, 1782 - November 2, 1783), Thomas Mifflin (November 3, 1783 - June 3, 1784), Richard Henry Lee (November 30, 1784 - November 22, 1785), John Hancock (November 23, 1785 - June 5, 1786), Nathaniel Gorham (June 1786 until January 1787), Arthur St. Clair (February 2 , 1787 - January 21, 1788), and Cyrus Griffin (January 22, 1788 – April 29, 1789)--under The Articles of the Confederation.
Everything you know is wrong--George Washington was the 9th President
--or 8th, depending on how you call it on John Hancock's term. [More inside]
posted by y2karl on Nov 7, 2002 - 28 comments

Page: 1