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Ice flow nowhere to go

Stuck in the Antarctic ice we set out to study - Erik van Sebille of the Australasian Antarctic Expedition 2013 describes his fieldwork in Antarctica. The Guardian has extensive coverage of the expedition, including visiting the remains of a previous expedition, how they became icebound, and their rescue.
posted by Artw on Jan 14, 2014 - 17 comments

 

"But there was nothing natural about the way Rodney Marks died."

A Mysterious Death at the South Pole
posted by the man of twists and turns on Nov 24, 2013 - 56 comments

"Egg," the seal said. "Gub. Gleg."

Reluctant seal doesn't want to go into the water. (SLYT)
posted by theodolite on Nov 10, 2013 - 57 comments

Do you folks like coffee

In a move eerily reminiscent of Dethklok's performance of the Duncan Hines Coffee Jingle (albeit at the opposite pole), Metallica will be performing in Antarctica. Just as the fictional death metal band partnered with a fictional coffee brand, Metallica bring their increasingly cartoonish presence to an audience "...of fans from Argentina, Chile, Colombia, Costa Rica and Mexico who enter a contest through Coca-Cola Zero." Oddly, the band will be performing inside a dome on the Carlini Argentine Base with no amplification, and the performance will be transmitted to fans through headphones. [more inside]
posted by Existential Dread on Oct 24, 2013 - 17 comments

You don't choose this race, it chooses you.

Blisters, Cramps & Heaves documents his experience running "The Last Marathon" in Antarctica with two detailed blog posts incorporating elevation maps, photography, video, cartoons, and final stats. First post covers pre-race experience, second post the race itself. Act 1 | Act 2 [more inside]
posted by joseph conrad is fully awesome on May 13, 2013 - 4 comments

"Some days we traveled backwards to travel forwards."

Two months breaking ice (in under five minutes) is a very cool narrated time-lapse of the icebreaker Nathaniel B. Palmer moving through the Antarctic Ross Sea, following and tracking a phytoplankton bloom. [more inside]
posted by quin on May 6, 2013 - 13 comments

Eighty-eight below

"This is video of an aurora australis taken at the geographic south pole! I'm not absolutely sure, but it might actually be the first true video of an aurora australis here, as opposed to a timelapse of longer exposures. Sorry about the swearing - if you were there seeing it you'd probably swear too."
posted by showbiz_liz on May 2, 2013 - 15 comments

But why?

Dr Ainley, is there such a thing as insanity among penguins? What makes a penguin abandon its life and quest into the heart of Antarctica? What is a life well-lived for a penguin, anyway? What makes a human spend a year in a frozen wasteland? Is scientific curiosity kin to the derangement of the penguin? A short clip from Werner Herzog's excellent film, Encounters at the End of the World.
posted by nicolas léonard sadi carnot on Feb 19, 2013 - 24 comments

Penguin Highway

While travelling in Antarctica, journalism student Melissa Brennan took this short video at an intersection of a penguin highway.
posted by hurdy gurdy girl on Feb 12, 2013 - 15 comments

So high, so low, so many things to know.

January 13, 2013 marks the 125th anniversary of the National Geographic Society. The Magazine is celebrating by taking a yearlong look at the past and future of exploration. [more inside]
posted by zarq on Jan 8, 2013 - 10 comments

The Last Great Explorer

Sir Ranulph Twistleton-Wickham-Fiennes is 68 years old, a cancer survivor, and he's preparing to tackle a six month 2,000 mile trek across Antarctica at night. Partially to raise money for charity, but mostly because if he doesn't accomplish it, someone else might manage it instead.
posted by BZArcher on Dec 28, 2012 - 18 comments

RIP Nicholas Johnson, author of Big Dead Place

Nicholas Johnson, author of Big Dead Place: Inside the Strange and Menacing World of Antarctica, committed suicide on November 28, in West Seattle. His friend and former roommate Jason Anthony (mentioned in the acknowledgements of Big Dead Place) has written an obituary. An obituary from the book's publisher, Feral House. An adaptation of Big Dead Place remains in development with HBO. Previously.
posted by Xere on Dec 8, 2012 - 29 comments

"Cocaine for Snowblindness"

You're about to be the base doctor at Halley Research Station in Antarctica for a year. For ten months, no one gets in or out. Fourteen lives are in your hands, including your own. What do you put in your medical kit? And how do your choices differ from those of your predecessors (Eric Marshall and Edward Wilson) a century ago?
posted by zarq on Oct 2, 2012 - 8 comments

The South Pole Foucault Pendulum

The South Pole Foucault Pendulum
posted by beshtya on Aug 28, 2012 - 42 comments

Fear and Loathing in Amundsen-Scott Station

Can't get enough Antarctic culture? [more inside]
posted by outlandishmarxist on Aug 24, 2012 - 40 comments

A Vicarious Way to Keep Cool

Use Google street view to explore some past and present Antarctic Research facilities. [more inside]
posted by EmpressCallipygos on Jul 19, 2012 - 17 comments

Sexual Habits of the Adélie Penguin

"Blizzards and freezing cold were one thing. Penguin perversion was another. Worse was to come, however. Levick spent the Antarctic summer of 1911-12 observing the colony of Adélies at Cape Adare, making him the only scientist to this day to have studied an entire breeding cycle there. " Penguin sex habits study rediscovered at Museum. [more inside]
posted by the man of twists and turns on Jun 9, 2012 - 21 comments

“Y’know Moeson, you really can’t do that kind of shit anymore.”

How to Climb Mount Erebus on Your Day Off. [more inside]
posted by unSane on Mar 11, 2012 - 80 comments

Face the thing that should not be

In the coldest spot on the earth’s coldest continent, Russian scientists have reached a freshwater lake the size of Lake Ontario after spending a decade drilling through more than two miles of solid ice. Maybe the mountains of madness are underground. Lovecraft would loved to have seen this.
posted by Hickeystudio on Feb 8, 2012 - 76 comments

Deep Time

The Geology of the Mountains of Madness
posted by Artw on Dec 19, 2011 - 19 comments

Join a research expedition to Antarctica

Join a research expedition to Antarctica's Mertz Glacier. Stunning photos, videos, interactives. [more inside]
posted by puffl on Apr 18, 2011 - 7 comments

It's all north from here

Last February work was completed on the South Pole Station. Curious how all that material gets to the bottom of the world? Not enough time to sit through YouTube goodness? Catch up on the latest research or just get a dose of cuteness. (my first post here...go easy on me!)
posted by ironbob on Feb 14, 2011 - 20 comments

Mysterious chunk of wood spotted on iceberg

An Australian journalist on board an icebreaker has spotted a mysterious piece of wood sitting on top of an iceberg in the Antarctic, posting photos reminiscent of the monolith from 2001: A Space Odyssey. Cue crazy theories about its origins. [more inside]
posted by puffl on Jan 23, 2011 - 110 comments

Polar Time-Lapse Photography

Time-lapse photography from above the polar circles • Antarctic: [ Following the sun around the horizon - Lunar Time Lapse (with a great aurora) - Aurora Australis - Scenes from around McMurdo and Scott bases - A day in the life outside the window at a McMurdo lab ] • Arctic: [ Bering Sea icebreaker ramming through pack ice - Icebreaker navigating through brash ice and swells at night - Same, at regular speed, in daytime - Sunrise in Greenland - Midnight sun from Grøtavær, Troms, Norway - Solar Eclipse from the Polish Station at Svalbard - Arctic sea ice, 1978-2009 - James Balog's TED talk about time-lapse proof of Alaskan glacial loss ]
posted by not_on_display on Jan 12, 2011 - 13 comments

POLENET

The team of scientists and young researchers at POLENET, stationed at Byrd camp on the west Antarctic ice sheet, have been video podcasting since October 2009. Their seventh features kickin' music by the Weepies. SLYT: Antarctica (song)
posted by friendlymilkman on Jan 2, 2011 - 2 comments

"A Gift From the Heavens for Whisky Lovers"

During his unsuccessful 1908 attempt to reach the South Pole, universal badass Ernest Shackleton left five crates of Scotch whisky and two crates of brandy buried in the ice under the floorboards of his hut at Cape Royds. The crates were dug up in February, and conservators are working on ten of the 114-year-old whisky bottles, some marked with ‘British Antarctic Expedition 1907 Ship Endurance,’ with an eye on replicating the long-lost blend. [more inside]
posted by gottabefunky on Nov 18, 2010 - 37 comments

Google PenguinView

Google PenguinView
posted by KokuRyu on Oct 1, 2010 - 21 comments

Nothing to fear

Very happy Gentoo penguin. [more inside]
posted by Potomac Avenue on Sep 3, 2010 - 34 comments

Move any mountain

Director Guillermo Del Toro has announced that he will no longer be directing The Hobbit, and has made a follow up statement today. Speculation is rife as to what he might work on next, having given up that massive commitment. Some are speculating, based on this AICN interview promoting the movie Splice, that going forwards with his adaptation of HP Lovecraft's At The Mountains of Madness may be on his mind again.
posted by Artw on Jun 6, 2010 - 61 comments

Maybe Next Year

Every year for the past 26 years, the United States has faced off against New Zealand in rugby ... on the ice sheets of McMurdo Sound. [Pages 2, 3, 4] [more inside]
posted by SpringAquifer on Mar 23, 2010 - 25 comments

Guinea pigs, monkeys, and humans.

How we lost the cure for scurvy. "Now, I had been taught in school that scurvy had been conquered in 1747...but here was a Royal Navy surgeon in 1911 apparently ignorant of what caused the disease, or how to cure it. Somehow a highly-trained group of scientists at the start of the 20th century knew less about scurvy than the average sea captain in Napoleonic times."
posted by rodgerd on Mar 8, 2010 - 90 comments

Penguins aren't much help with surgery.

Auto-appendectomy in the Antarctic.
posted by dmd on Jan 13, 2010 - 56 comments

Artifact of Early Antarctic Aviation Found

Early in the days of exploration of Antarctica, Australian geologist Douglas Mawson turned down an invitation to join Robert Falcon Scott's Terra Nova Expedition in 1910 (Cool Antarctica previously). Instead, Mawson lead his own expedition, the Australasian Antarctic Expedition (December 1911 to December 1913), an expedition to chart the 2000-mile coastline directly south of Australia, one of the least-visited parts of the continent throughout the early years of Antarctic exploration. The group's efforts and activities are well documented, and many remnants of the expedition remain on Antarctica. The conservation of Mawson's Huts is now an ongoing effort from Association of Australasian Palaeontologists (AAP) Mawson's Huts Foundation. While most efforts were focused on the recovery and treatment of artifacts inside the main hut, the group also searched for the Vickers (Aviation) monoplane that was modified to become an "air tractor", or motorized sledge. The remains of the plane were last seen in 1975. Now the plane has been found, thanks to an exceptionally low tide and a bit of luck. [more inside]
posted by filthy light thief on Jan 5, 2010 - 11 comments

Sea Stars

Timelapse of swarming monster worms and sea stars (via)
posted by vronsky on Dec 1, 2009 - 59 comments

A Squid on the Ice

A Squid on the Ice. From fermion, an Antarctic mefite: "The continuing saga of Science and Adventure with the Squid (that's me) in and around Antarctica's McMurdo Station. Includes cool science, musings on Lovecraft, the logistics of Antarctic life, and lots of pictures. We're hoping to get out to the Dry Valleys sometime soon." [via mefi projects]
posted by ocherdraco on Sep 13, 2009 - 22 comments

Social Documentarian

Daryl Peveto is a freelance photographer and videographer with a passion for social documentary storytelling. Over the last few years he has worked on issues ranging from American nomads to bullfighting in Tijuana to Antarctica: The White Continent to the black market economies of Peru. His photoblog is a sketchbook for story ideas and visual explorations.
posted by netbros on Jun 27, 2009 - 4 comments

Past the Point of Safe Return

In 1999, Dr. Jerri Nielsen was the only doctor in the winterover crew at the South Pole Station in Antarctica. While there, she discovered and treated her own breast cancer until she could be airlifted out. She died yesterday of breast cancer at age 57. [more inside]
posted by rtha on Jun 24, 2009 - 55 comments

Suck my exhaust, "Happy Feet"!

Saturday Flash Hangover: Help a penguin Learn to Fly and scratch "flighless bird" from that stupid wikipedia article. [more inside]
posted by Decimask on Jun 20, 2009 - 11 comments

Blood Tide

Blood Falls - The iron rich red liquid gushing from a buried Antarctica lake shows how life may have existed on a snowball Earth, or on Europa.
posted by Artw on Apr 18, 2009 - 52 comments

Antarctic Fox

Antarctica travel blog, done Big Picture style. Kevin Fox, formerly a designer at Yahoo and Google (who wrote a great response to Doug Bowman's design-by-metrics post) took a trip to Antarctica a couple months back and has been slowly updating a mini-site, exhaustively describing and showing photos from each part of each day he was down there. There are icebergs. There are penguins. There is swimming. There is drinking. It's all done in a wonderful large image Big Picture style that makes me drop everything whenever the feed updates. Start at the top and read the whole way through.
posted by mathowie on Mar 23, 2009 - 23 comments

Photographs of polar explorations 1845-1960

Freeze Frame a new collection of over 20,000 photographs of British and international polar explorations from 1845-1960, from the Scott Polar Research Institute, Cambridge. [more inside]
posted by Lanark on Mar 6, 2009 - 12 comments

"The oods are good, but the goods are odd."

The Ukrainians have a station about 50 miles south of Palmer, called Vernandsky. We all piled onto the resupply icebreaker ship one weekend and took a trip down to pester them and say hi, sort of a "Howdy, neighbor!" type thing. That was cool, they have a still there and make their own vodka. It's, uh, potent. Tsaven Nava talks to SA about working in Antarctica.
posted by The Whelk on Jan 22, 2009 - 29 comments

Walking On The Moon

Australian Duncan Chessell (autoloading video) plans to spend four months trekking across Antarctica's frozen wasteland to reach the South Pole. Currently, he's leading a team of seven to the peak of Mt Vinson, Antarctica's highest point. He intends to make his trip to the pole 100 years after a similar feat was attempted by the great British explorer Robert Falcon Scott (previously). Meanwhile, another team aims to "become the youngest, fastest team in the world to reach the South Pole unsupported and unguided."
posted by Marisa Stole the Precious Thing on Jan 16, 2009 - 16 comments

Go-around power please

An Air New Zealand Airbus A320 crashed in the Mediterranean last week while on an acceptance testing flight at the end of a lease. The tragedy occurred on the 29th anniversary of the airline's worst disaster, the crash of sightseeing flight TE901 in the Antarctic. Beginning in 1977, the popular one-day flights took passengers on low level flights over the Ross Dependency, with experienced guides providing commentary. TE 901 flew on beautiful, clear day, and yet the DC-10 collided with the side of Mt Erebus, killing all 257 on board. The original accident report cited pilot error, but that was only the beginning. [more inside]
posted by szechuan on Dec 3, 2008 - 12 comments

Safe return doubtful. Honour and recognition in event of success.

On Oct. 27th, 1915. Sir Ernest Shackleton gave the order to abandon ship, moving the crew and supplies off of the ice bound Endurance. The Imperial Trans-Antarctic Expedition would never achieve it's goal of crossing the continent, instead Shackleton would become famous for somethings far greater: his masterful and amazing ability at leadership and survival for himself and his crew of 27 men under the harshest conditions imaginable. [more inside]
posted by mrzarquon on Oct 27, 2008 - 59 comments

Go south, young polar bear

A new campaign plans to relocate polar bears to Antarctica to protect them from the effects of climate change. Based on the rates of ice melt in the North, scientists say most polar bears will be gone by 2050. The first bears will be moved on Earth Day, April 22. The relocation will be the initial step in a planned five-year program to migrate 3,000 polar bears from the Northern Arctic to the southern continent of Antarctica. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service plans to rule soon on whether to list polar bears as endangered species; however, it has indicated that relocating polar bears would be much less expensive to taxpayers than listing them under the 1973 act.
posted by commonmedia on Mar 31, 2008 - 24 comments

Brrrrr-osaurus?

The Strange Lives of Polar Dinosaurs: How did they endure months of perpetual cold and dark? See also Taking A Dinosaur's Temperature: Polar species heat up one of paleontology's great debates. And Bones To Pick: Paleontologist William Hammer hunts dinosaur fossils in the Antarctic. From Smithsonian Magazine.
posted by amyms on Jan 20, 2008 - 22 comments

Kadath in the Cold Waste

Landsat Image Mosaic Of Antarctica UK and US researchers peice together the most detailed map of Antarctica yet, searching through years of data to find cloud free images.
posted by Artw on Nov 27, 2007 - 17 comments

Introducing Nunatak

Introducing Nunatak They are an indie-folk fusion band, but you've probably never heard of them unless you've been to Rothera Research Station in Antarctica. Their first live gig will be broadcast 07/07/07 to hundreds of millions of people on more than 120 networks around the world. Al Gore invited them to play Live Earth because the runway at Rothera is too small for major rock stars. And he promised concerts on all 7 continents. They will have a gorgeous stage, performing outside on the ice if the weather is nice, say minus 15F or so.
posted by culberjo on Jun 14, 2007 - 7 comments

Every cloud has a silver lining, and some sub-ice seas have orange starfish

After two big Antarctic ice shelves broke off several years ago, a world of new species was found underneath. Pictures and a press release came out yesterday, showing spindly orange starfish among other interesting creatures. Here is some more information on the expedition. The fact that the shelves melted when they did is most likely a result of global warming, but having them out of the way gave researchers a golden opportunity to study what lives beneath the ice. Other occassions where a disaster has simultaneously been a great research opportunity include radioactive fallouts: at Chernobyl the evacuated area has been monitored for the past decades to see which species move in and how they thrive (previously on Metafilter)
posted by easternblot on Feb 26, 2007 - 21 comments

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