840 posts tagged with Architecture.
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such is the folly of man

The Radical Sandcastles of Matt Kaliner, aka Sandcastle Matt: How To Build Sandcastles The Sandcastle Matt Way [more inside]
posted by the man of twists and turns on Nov 13, 2015 - 8 comments

The mail chutes of New York City

New York City's mail chutes are lovely, ingenious and almost entirely ignored. But what happens if mail gets stuck?
posted by Ragini on Nov 7, 2015 - 36 comments

A Chicago Sojourn

A journey through the architecture and urban landscape of Chicago – from industrial zones to Mid-Century suburbs and all points between. [more inside]
posted by davejh on Oct 12, 2015 - 6 comments

“the art of turning fiction into fact.”

Meet the Superstar Architect Transforming NYC’s Skyline [more inside]
posted by the man of twists and turns on Oct 12, 2015 - 10 comments

The Smartest Building in the World

Inside the connected future of architecture.
posted by ellieBOA on Oct 6, 2015 - 32 comments

The Architecture of Waste

The Missing Link: Architecture and Waste Management [more inside]
posted by the man of twists and turns on Sep 29, 2015 - 6 comments

Architecture Daily Sketches

How to draw buildings, trees and people.
posted by andrewcooke on Sep 20, 2015 - 7 comments

"The Multiverse is surrounded by grazing pastures"

Atop the twin spires of the Andromeda and Milky Way Galaxies the eerie call-and-response of bagpipe players echoed across the valley. I watched four siblings race one another up to the top of the Multiverse's spire as their mother, standing at the base, tried to maneuver a cell phone around the fifth child strapped to her chest.
-The Duke, the Landscape Architect and the World's Most Ambitious Attempt to Bring the Cosmos to Earth by Alina Simone is an article about the Crawick Multiverse in Dumfriesshire, Scotland, and its designer, landscape architect Charles Jencks. The garden is designed to represent modern cosmological theories.
posted by Kattullus on Sep 18, 2015 - 8 comments

A fascinating journey of architectural obsession

Likely the largest collection of Soviet Bus Stops ever assembled.
posted by BuddhaInABucket on Sep 16, 2015 - 13 comments

Indian stairwells

Rudimentary stepwells first appeared in India between the 2nd and 4th centuries A.D., born of necessity in a capricious climate zone bone-dry for much of the year followed by torrential monsoon rains for many weeks. It was essential to guarantee a year-round water-supply for drinking, bathing, irrigation and washing, particularly in the arid states of Gujarat (where they’re called vavs) and Rajasthan (where they’re baoli, baori, or bawdi) where the water table could be inconveniently buried ten-stories or more underground. Over the centuries, stepwell construction evolved so that by the 11th century they were astoundingly complex feats of engineering, architecture, and art.
posted by curious nu on Aug 31, 2015 - 20 comments

Let's play spot the former plantation

Something you seldom think about: A fascinating imgur set of The Governor's Mansions of the United States, sorted alphabetically. [more inside]
posted by growabrain on Aug 29, 2015 - 91 comments

Paper people not included.

A growing paper city, models by Charles Young. [via] [more inside]
posted by jacquilynne on Aug 11, 2015 - 6 comments

The promise and the peril of the exoskeleton.

"The tension, the promise, and the peril of the exoskeleton: It is great for some, but in the gusto for technological solutions, for stories that “inspire” and for devices that pull people into the “normal” world, people can lose sight of a future that could be much better. " Rose Eveleth at The Atlantic writes about exoskeletons and other forms of assistive technology for people with disabilities, the life-changing things they can do, and the possibility that they are blinding us to other ways to look at disability, accessibility, and infrastructure. This is part of Remaking the Bodies, a series on how science and technology are re-engineering the human body.
posted by Stacey on Aug 7, 2015 - 37 comments

The Eviction Series

Paul Madonna (previously on MeFi) and his wife have been evicted from the home and workspace in which they've lived for ten years. In response, Paul is drawing and writing All Over Coffee: The Eviction Series about his life in San Francisco right now.
posted by mattdidthat on Aug 2, 2015 - 21 comments

The Bridge at Q’eswachaka

The last remaining Inca rope bridge is the Q'eswachaka, spanning the Apurimac River in Peru. Even though there is a modern bridge nearby, the residents of the region keep the ancient tradition and skills alive by renewing the bridge annually, in June. Several family groups have each prepared a number of grass-ropes to be formed into cables at the site, others prepare mats for decking, and the reconstruction is a communal effort. In 2009 the government recognized the bridge and its maintenance as part of the cultural heritage of Peru.
posted by growabrain on Jul 25, 2015 - 17 comments

The destruction of Penn Station

We will probably be judged not by the monuments we build but by those we have destroyed. So wrote Ada Louise Huxtable in a NY Times editorial condemning the destruction of Penn Station. The outrage was a major catalyst for the architectural preservation movement in the United States. In 1965, the New York Landmarks Law was passed, which helped save the iconic Grand Central Terminal and more than 30,000 other buildings from similar fates.
posted by Obscure Reference on Jul 21, 2015 - 37 comments

au sommet de les pavés, la plage

The National Building Museum in Washington DC is hosting an interactive installation by the design collaborative Snarkitecture: THE BEACH [more inside]
posted by the man of twists and turns on Jul 8, 2015 - 9 comments

Inside JFK's amazing, abandoned TWA terminal

A pristine time capsule from 1962. Stunning pictures and video from this classic terminal, designed by famed Finnish architect Eero Saarinen. [via] [more inside]
posted by SpookyFish on Jul 7, 2015 - 40 comments

A taste for isometrics

Spotting real-world architecture in Monument Valley
posted by Artw on Jun 29, 2015 - 7 comments

RIP, a Great Indian architect

He was a prophet without imprimatur in his own city. Charles Correa, who passed away late on the night of 16 June, was among the great architects of our times. His institutional buildings across the world are all iconic. Yet, Mumbai, his lifelong home, boasts just one* residential tower designed by him – an irony as much as a travesty. Though the cubist Kanchanjunga is eye-catching, it’s still high-rise: a genre caustically savaged by this patron saint of low-slung architecture.
[more inside] posted by infini on Jun 19, 2015 - 4 comments

"It’s legendary for being the most hated building in Paris."

Seven Leading Architects Defend the World’s Most Hated Buildings
posted by Chrysostom on Jun 10, 2015 - 165 comments

But is it fools' gold?

The Golden Ratio or the Golden Mean is touted as universal principle of mathematics, aesthetics, and architecture. Its natural occurrences are often associated with beauty and health. But naysayers think the Golden Ratio is myth or even a scam. Golden ratio previously and previouslier.
posted by immlass on May 26, 2015 - 28 comments

The Dom-Ino Effect

In 1914 Le Corbusier designed, but never built, an open-plan slab concrete house he caled Dom-Ino, combining domus and innovation. One was built to match the plans at the Vienna Biennial in 2014, but you can see the dom-ino philosophy in the skeletons of buildings all over: The Radical Le Corbusier Design That Shaped Italy [more inside]
posted by the man of twists and turns on May 26, 2015 - 20 comments

A gorgeously tiled and carved Moroccan court, at a reduced scale

Building the Moroccan Court at the Metropolitan Museum of Art [slyt, 17m44s] "In 2011, The Metropolitan Museum of Art opened the New Galleries for the Art of the Arab Lands, Turkey, Iran, Central Asia, and Later South Asia, which house the Museum's renowned collection of Islamic art. A vital part of the installation was the Patti Cadby Birch Court, a Moroccan court built by a team of experts—from curators and historians to designers and craftsmen—over many months.... This video documents a marvelous journey from Fez to New York, and the creation of a twenty-first-century court using traditional fifteenth-century methods."
posted by ocherdraco on May 20, 2015 - 5 comments

The next Googleplex goes way beyond free snacks and massages.

Big and Weird: The Architectural Genius of Bjarke Ingels and Thomas Heatherwick
The vision outlined in these documents, an application for a major expansion of the Googleplex, its campus, is mind-boggling. The proposed design, developed by the European architectural firms of Bjarke Ingels Group and Heatherwick Studio, does away with doors. It abandons thousands of years of conventional thinking about walls. And stairs. And roofs. Google and its imaginative co-founder and chief executive, Larry Page, essentially want to take 60 acres of land adjacent to the headquarters near the San Francisco Bay, in an area called North Bayshore, and turn it into a titanic human terrarium.
[more inside] posted by the man of twists and turns on May 14, 2015 - 52 comments

A Year in the Metabolist Future of 1972

Tokyo's Nakagin Capsule Tower [previously] was designed to be upgraded every 20 years or so. Instead it's been slowly disintegrating for more than 40. Two young architects lived there for a year and described what it's like. [more inside]
posted by moonmilk on May 13, 2015 - 41 comments

Hardcore Architecture

"Hardcore Architecture explores the relationship between the architecture of living spaces and the history of underground American hardcore bands in the 1980s."
posted by Sokka shot first on May 13, 2015 - 18 comments

it is a form of grammatical resistance as a deconstructionist

Indigenous Architecture through Indigenous Knowledge: Dim sagalts’apkw nisim̓ [Together we will build a village] by Patrick Robert Reid Stewart

UBC student writes 52,438 word architecture dissertation with no punctuation — not everyone loved it
posted by andoatnp on May 8, 2015 - 55 comments

One Year of Emptiness at the Krach Leadership Center

Fredrik deBoer reflects on disparities among university buildings and what they say about different approaches to higher education: [more inside]
posted by audi alteram partem on May 4, 2015 - 27 comments

Its shaggy, wooly look

"We applied recycled LAN cables, which we call Mojamoja – to describe its shaggy, wooly look – and what is called acrylic ball (left-over melted acrylic byproduct pieces) to everything from interior materials to furniture."
posted by Brandon Blatcher on Apr 23, 2015 - 15 comments

How a San Francisco Architect Reframes Design for the Blind

Even though Lorenz, who, like Downey, is blind, can't see the space before her, she knows exactly what to expect. On her desk at the ILRC's current office on Mission Street, she keeps a tactile floor plan that Downey printed for her. The plan's fine web of raised lines looks like an elaborate decorative pattern, suggesting a leaf of handmade stationery or a large sheet from which doilies are about to be cut. Though Downey has consulted on other architects' projects since going blind six years ago, this one marks a turning point for him. The community center is the first space he's designed since losing his sight. The center recently opened its doors to the public with a celebration to inaugurate the new space, located on Howard Street in the city's Yerba Buena district, just down the block from the Moscone convention center. But on this May afternoon, the walls are just beginning to go up.
posted by ellieBOA on Apr 21, 2015 - 4 comments

The High Line's New Museum

A New Whitney It has been interesting to watch the High Line progress from nothing more than a dream to its current wonderful reality mixing green, gleam and grit. Jason's early unauthorized foray introduced many around these parts to the High Line. Now the Whitney moves in.
posted by caddis on Apr 19, 2015 - 11 comments

Growth Over All

Journalist Felix Salmon brings us up to speed on the increasingly strange and complicated saga of The Cooper Union School For The Advancement Of Science And Art, one of the last historically free schools in the US for Art, Architecture and Engineering, which may be brought down by shameless trustees, incompetent management, the State Attorney General, or pure greed. (Cooper Union charging tuition previously. Cooper Union students occupying the president's office previously)
posted by The Whelk on Apr 16, 2015 - 21 comments

Laura Kicey's architectural collages

Laura Kicey took photos of building all over the world and made colorful architectural collages out of them.
posted by of strange foe on Apr 10, 2015 - 6 comments

Anyone have a Pop-up blocker? For houses?

Washington DC is going through a real estate boom. Except there isn’t a lot of real estate to build on. The unique combination of population density, rapidly gentrifying neighborhoods and lax zoning and code regulations means developers eager to cash in on the District’s real estate boom have been taking hundred year old rowhouses bought for a song, throwing on a third floor “pop-up” and converting them into condo units. More often than not, the designs of the pop-ups look nothing like the rest of the neighborhood, prompting neighbor ire about the character of the neighborhood architecture being changed. [more inside]
posted by Karaage on Mar 27, 2015 - 65 comments

From Middle Class Anxiety To Factory Fueling Station

"Parlors, “dining chambers,” and other spaces amenable to dining began appearing in architecture plans. Each nation seemed to have its own idea as to what constituted a proper dining room. The great Renaissance architect Leon Battista Alberti wrote that it “should be entered off the bosom of the house,” advising further that, “[a]s use demands, there should be [a dining room] for summer, one for winter, and one for middling seasons.” Some two centuries later Englishman William Sanderson would recommend that a “Dyning-Roome” be hung with pictures of kings and queens." The Austerity Kitchen presents A Short History Of The Dining Room Part 1 / Part 2.
posted by The Whelk on Mar 23, 2015 - 22 comments

Design is hack.

Archillect, billed as The Ocular Engine, is a recent project from enigmatic designer Murat Pak. [more inside]
posted by Otherwise on Mar 20, 2015 - 4 comments

"In a sense, there is no such thing as healing."

American Mine [more inside]
posted by the man of twists and turns on Mar 15, 2015 - 6 comments

Boring rooftop? Put a house on it

If your apartment building is looking a little plain, just build a house on the roof. NYC isn’t the only place to find homes on rooftops, though some aren’t for the faint of heart.
posted by _Mona_ on Mar 3, 2015 - 27 comments


If I asked you where the tallest structure in the Western hemisphere was located, would you say North Dakota? [more inside]
posted by sockermom on Mar 2, 2015 - 58 comments

LA's cultural and historical legacy: more than being able to turn right at a red light

HistoricPlacesLA is the first online information and management system specifically created to inventory, map, and help protect the City of Los Angeles' significant historic resources. It showcases the city's diversity of historic resources, including architecturally significant buildings and places of social importance as well as historic districts, bridges, parks, and streetscapes. You can search for specifics or try some popular seaches, and the map view let's you combine different overlays and base maps.
posted by Room 641-A on Feb 28, 2015 - 6 comments

Defensive Architecture Keeping Poverty Unseen

The spikes installed outside Selfridges in Manchester are the latest front in the spread of ‘defensive architecture’. Is such open hostility towards the destitute making all our lives uglier?
posted by ellieBOA on Feb 20, 2015 - 46 comments

somewhere between Las Vegas and Pyongyang

Ashgabat City of White Marble constructed in desert. [more inside]
posted by asok on Feb 16, 2015 - 31 comments

The Paradise on Earth

The Virtual Traveller to Sri Lanka. [via]
posted by Think_Long on Feb 12, 2015 - 8 comments


A collection of paper cut-out models representing brutalist architecture of London from 1960s-1970s. See also Warsaw.
posted by Combustible Edison Lighthouse on Feb 4, 2015 - 29 comments

Very Borgesian

A reflective view of the main core of The Beinecke Rare Book & Manuscript Library at Yale.
The building was designed by Gordon Bunshaft, of the firm of Skidmore, Owings and Merrill, and completed in 1963. When visitors first enter the building they are faced by two large marble staircases that ascend up to the mezzanine level and a large glass tower that is the central core of the building. The mezzanine level allows for people to rotate around the glass tower which holds 180,000 volumes. [more inside]
posted by growabrain on Jan 23, 2015 - 22 comments

We let the crazy flag fly here at House Crazy

House Crazy is a blog about weird and/or beautiful houses, like this "bizarre house-like thing in the [California] desert", this obnoxiously opulent ski chalet or thismagical San Francisco Victorian. There are also interesting articles on crime scene houses like the the House at Hex Hollow and the house where Sharon Tate was murdered.
posted by desjardins on Jan 16, 2015 - 54 comments

The remains of Bradbury’s home

The lovely house where Ray Bradbury lived for 50 years is being torn down by its new owner, architect Thom Mayne.
posted by xowie on Jan 14, 2015 - 114 comments


Tourist: Whaddya call that window over there?
Vermonter: Which window?
Tourist: Thanks! drives off [more inside]
posted by the man of twists and turns on Jan 13, 2015 - 35 comments

Melk Abbey

Melk Abbey is a Benedictine abbey founded in 1089 CE in the Wachau valley, Lower Austria. Today's baroque abbey was built in the early 18th century. A dozen 360 panoramas of the interior and exterior of the abbey. Three more 360 panoramas, including the library. Melk Abbey-Austria-UNESCO World Heritage Site. The Danube and Melk Abbey. [more inside]
posted by cwest on Jan 2, 2015 - 6 comments

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