6620 posts tagged with Art.
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like I'm the only person who ever mixed a margarita in a sailor's mouth!

How Many Men Did The Golden Girls Sleep With, Exactly?
Refinery 29 claims to have tallied up the numbers. (A quick summary courtesy of Jezebel.) [more inside]
posted by flex on Sep 1, 2015 - 31 comments

Eyes on the Ladyprize

The Tropes vs Women in Video Games project aims to examine the plot devices and patterns most often associated with female characters in gaming from a systemic, big picture perspective. - Tropes vs Women: Women as Reward. Tropes versus Women creator Anita Sarkeesian on the backlash to the series (Warning: GamerGate), Previously, previously.
posted by Artw on Aug 31, 2015 - 30 comments

I Could Do That

"So you look at a work of art and think to yourself, I could have done that. And maybe you really could have, but the issue here is more complex than that -- why didn't you? Why did the artist? And why does it have an audience?"
A primer from PBS Digital Studios, addressing common questions about modern art. (YT, 5:40)
posted by Countess Elena on Aug 30, 2015 - 33 comments

100 Days of Pleasantries

Social media personality extraordinaire Jacq The Stripper chronicles 100 moments from her life on the job, complete with droll, colorful pen & paper doodles. It's like Humans of New York, but with a strip club.
posted by zeusianfog on Aug 29, 2015 - 7 comments

A Critical Library

What books should a critic own? "Each week, the National Book Critics Circle will post a list of five books a critic believes reviewers should have in their libraries." Here are all the lists, from 2007-2011. [more inside]
posted by thetortoise on Aug 29, 2015 - 14 comments

Don’t be afraid or embarrassed to stare at it

Artist Teresita Fernández muses on the creative process.
posted by Brandon Blatcher on Aug 27, 2015 - 5 comments

From Chaplin to Zuckerberg

The Evolution of Magazine Covers
posted by fearfulsymmetry on Aug 27, 2015 - 15 comments

Leaving Everywhere

I've looked at the US Census Bureau data, and the numbers don't lie. They paint a dire picture. On top of all that they closed one of my favorite mac & cheese joints. Look, I still love this place. Sometimes. But I'm done with wherever I am. Best of luck to those who stay wherever they are.
posted by a lungful of dragon on Aug 27, 2015 - 34 comments

Outerpants included

The entire 1982 DC Comics Style Guide is online and amazing
posted by Artw on Aug 26, 2015 - 71 comments

A dabbawalla in a taxi!

Taxi Fabric - connecting designers with taxi drivers – turning seat covers into canvas’ for young Indian designers to show off their design talent and storytelling skills. [via Art Radar]
posted by unliteral on Aug 24, 2015 - 11 comments

An advertisement for planet Earth.

Ripple - a short film by Connor Griffith. "It's a flurry of frame-by-frame images, mostly from Google Earth and Wikipedia, that depict the many developed and undeveloped surfaces on the planet." - the Atlantic.
posted by You Should See the Other Guy on Aug 24, 2015 - 5 comments

Everybody celebrates the human body

Conceived by Australian avant-garde theatre group Snuff Puppets, Everybody is a giant 26.5m human puppet with articulated, detachable and interactive body parts and organs. Everybody is all genders and multi-racial; it is also the largest human puppet on the planet. An immersive experience, audiences can walk around, sit on, lie against, get inside, and cuddle up to Everybody. [NSFW and yet...meant for kids. But really, NSFW.] [more inside]
posted by Room 641-A on Aug 22, 2015 - 53 comments

“Coal-black is better than another hue,”

Vengeance, Death, Blood, and Revenge by Dan Piepenbring [The Paris Review] Leonard Baskin’s grotesque etchings of William Shakespeare's Titus Andronicus. Below are some of the highlights to his Andronicus etchings—he made twenty-four in all. You can see more at the Fine Arts Museum of San Francisco, which has a number of Baskin’s works in their collection. [more inside]
posted by Fizz on Aug 22, 2015 - 9 comments

“She was a symbol,” he said. “And she died for others.”

Marion True, former curator at the Getty, discusses the charges of looting leveled against her in 2005. “The art is on the market. We don’t know where it comes from. And until we know where it comes from, it’s better off in a museum collection. And when we know where it comes from, we will give it back.”
posted by PussKillian on Aug 21, 2015 - 6 comments

DNA sculptures in London

London art trail: 'What's in your DNA?' | sculpture gallery | map. [more inside]
posted by joseph conrad is fully awesome on Aug 20, 2015 - 1 comment

amusements and anarchism

Banksy opens a theme park, Dismaland
posted by fearfulsymmetry on Aug 20, 2015 - 57 comments

You know, it was visually delicious.

"Pee-wee’s Playhouse is where you can stop at every roadside attraction in the world." Patreon's Art of the Title speak with Prudence Fenton, Phil Trumbo and Paul "Pee-wee Herman" Reubens about the two-minute animation that opened each episode of the classic 1980s television program Pee-wee’s Playhouse
posted by a lungful of dragon on Aug 19, 2015 - 2 comments

Julie Dillon - artist

Julie Dillion is an award winning science fiction and fantasy artist in a field that rarely nominates women. One of the themes of her work is diversity. And yes, she's up for the Best Professional Artist Hugo again this year.
posted by ladyriffraff on Aug 19, 2015 - 13 comments

Zozobra, making Santa Fe's fiesta celebrations more with pyrotechnics

In 1924, the longest-running community festival in the United States, Las Fiestas de Santa Fe, got a bit weirder, thanks to the artist Will Shuster. That year, he found inspiration in the burning of Judas effigies, specifically the practice including firecrackers, performed by the Yaqui Indians of northwest Mexico (Google books preview) and he created Zozobra (meaning anxiety, worry in Spanish, nicknamed "Old Man Gloom" or "the gloomy one"). The burning effigy was joined by a fire spirit dancer around 1933, originally created by Jacques Cartier, formerly a ballet dancer in New York. [more inside]
posted by filthy light thief on Aug 19, 2015 - 6 comments

Wine, Conversation, & a Hike With The Scariest Guy in Black Metal

Gaahl is the former vocalist for Gorgoroth, Norwegin black metal powerhouse and satanic ideologues. In 2005 he was sentenced to 14 months in prison for beating and torturing an intruder in his home. In 2007 Vice went to the remote Norwegian hamlet of Espedal (named for/owned by Gaahl's family for generations) to talk music, philosophy, painting, and get some insights into True Norwegian Black Metal. [more inside]
posted by Pirate-Bartender-Zombie-Monkey on Aug 18, 2015 - 34 comments

The Lisbon Earthquake of 1755

The Museu do Azulejo in Lisbon has an amazing panorama (video) of the city painted shortly before the historic earthquake of 1755 (image, here are some sections). Azulejo is a traditional form of Portuguese painted tiles -- the "azul" does NOT come from the blue color, a fairly recent development, but from the much older Arabic word "zellige" meaning "polished stones". This panorama comes from an age before photography and provides a look at the old city in a characteristic Portuguese art form, providing a fascinating glimpse into the old city before it was virtually destroyed. [more inside]
posted by Mrs. Pterodactyl on Aug 18, 2015 - 18 comments

253'28"

John Cage and Morton Feldman in conversation.
posted by shakespeherian on Aug 17, 2015 - 17 comments

The Sims

Interactive simulations for science and math for teachers and interested students, from acids and bases to waves
posted by a lungful of dragon on Aug 14, 2015 - 4 comments

Benjamin Shine - Tulle Works

Benjamin Shine is a fashion designer and fabric artist, who has done some fantastic three dimensional works created in tulle. He talks about and demonstrates his process with an iron and thread in this video.
posted by filthy light thief on Aug 11, 2015 - 3 comments

Paper people not included.

A growing paper city, models by Charles Young. [via] [more inside]
posted by jacquilynne on Aug 11, 2015 - 6 comments

“Late” according to whom?

Welcome to Bloom — a literary site devoted to highlighting, profiling, reviewing, and interviewing authors whose first major work was published when they were age 40 or older. Bloom is also a community of artists and readers who believe that “late” is a relative term, not an absolute one, and who are interested in bringing to attention a wide variety of artistic paths — challenging any narrow, prevailing ideas about the pacing and timing of creative fruition. (via Ask)
posted by You Should See the Other Guy on Aug 10, 2015 - 10 comments

Their mission is far from over.

The Guerrilla Girls, After 3 Decades, Still Rattling Art World Cages
posted by shakespeherian on Aug 9, 2015 - 4 comments

I can give you a tour. I think you look lovely tonight. I'm a gift.

Sophia Foster-Dimino is an illustrator and cartoonist.
Foster-Dimino’s ability to articulate very specific, very familiar, rarely articulated emotional sensations is uncanny here. (...) “Have you noticed that loving someone is like pouring water into a well,” asks the frenemy. “You don’t pour water into a well you get water out of a well,” protests the protagonist, now crying. “Your lover is a deep dark delicious well & you’re nothing but a bucket,” her tormenter responds without missing a beat. “Not even a cool bucket,” she continues, “a lackluster ordinary bucket—that feels so heavy but holds so little.” To be blunt, fuuuuuuuck.
[more inside]
posted by glass origami robot on Aug 7, 2015 - 13 comments

The Revolution Has Been Digitized.

Collections of activist ephemera (posters, leaflets, etc) are increasingly available online. The University of Michigan Library recently made available its digitized Joseph A. Labadie Collection of activist and political posters dating back to 1911. Selected posters from Michael Rossman's 25,000 piece collection "All Of Us Or None" are available online at the Oakland Museum of California. Lincoln Cushing's archive is up at Docs Populi: documents for the public . (via) (previously) [more inside]
posted by spamandkimchi on Aug 4, 2015 - 5 comments

Dying for their Art

in hamburg in the twenties of the past century lived a girl who was a dancer named lavinia schulz with her boyfriend, who was a dancer too, named walter holdt.
They were known as the mask dancers.
Knowledge of their astonishingly bizarre and tragic art is obscure and largely based on the rediscovery in 1986 of artifacts deposited in a Hamburg museum back in 1925.
posted by adamvasco on Aug 3, 2015 - 17 comments

The Eviction Series

Paul Madonna (previously on MeFi) and his wife have been evicted from the home and workspace in which they've lived for ten years. In response, Paul is drawing and writing All Over Coffee: The Eviction Series about his life in San Francisco right now.
posted by mattdidthat on Aug 2, 2015 - 21 comments

The Imaginary Network

The Imaginary Network rounds up under categories the various subreddits for imaginary art such as Imaginary Cityscapes, Ebony, Architecture, Ruins, History, Science, Starships, Aww, Weather, Armored Women and more.
posted by TheophileEscargot on Aug 1, 2015 - 12 comments

“There was art before him and art after him and they were not the same.”

Caravaggio [Part 1] [Part 2] [Part 3] [Part 4] [Part 5] [Part 6] [Part 7] Art critic Robert Hughes reflects on the work of troubled Italian artist Caravaggio.
posted by Fizz on Aug 1, 2015 - 7 comments

You... you imbecile. You bloated idiot. You stupid fat-head you.

Adam Frost and Melanie Patrick of the British Film Institute take a look at film noir and what makes a film noir-ish.
posted by a lungful of dragon on Aug 1, 2015 - 12 comments

“Art is the lie that enables us to realize the truth.”

A History of Art in Three Colours (BBC) [Part 1] [Gold] [Part 2] [Blue] [Part 3] [White] Dr James Fox explores how, in the hands of artists, the colours gold, blue and white have stirred our emotions, changed the way we behave and even altered the course of history.
posted by Fizz on Jul 31, 2015 - 5 comments

Stars in His Pocket Like Grains of Sand

Science Fiction grandmaster Samuel R. Delaney interviewed by SF Signal, with a very long answer in part 2, and by The New Yorker where he talks about race, recent Hugo controversies being nothing new, and the past and future of science fiction.
posted by Artw on Jul 30, 2015 - 26 comments

“Writing is healing. Writing is art. Writing is learning.”

The Role of Writers in a STEM Obsessed Society
“As writers, it’s easy to think of how we matter to literature classrooms, but what the appointment of writers-in-residence in hospitals, history classrooms, foreign language learning spaces, and cooking schools reminds us is that we are relevant wherever there is humanity—which is to say, wherever humans are with their stories. Writing is healing. Writing is art. Writing is learning. As such, writing across the disciplines matters. Many models of artist residencies depend upon the retreat model, wherein the artist sequesters herself away with a small community of other artists. While these models have value, especially when considering how solitude relates to the creative process, it’s heartening to me to see more models catch on that value the place of the writer in society, rather than hidden away from it.”

posted by Fizz on Jul 30, 2015 - 44 comments

Boron is a Subdued Element...

Kaycie D. is an animator and artist who grew up on Disney films and has used that inspiration to create her own anthropomorphized illustrations of the chemical elements.
posted by Navelgazer on Jul 29, 2015 - 22 comments

Antelope? More like antelnope.

Kate Clark is an artist who uses clay to sculpt human faces for taxidermied animals. You can easily browse the gallery by starting here and using the arrow navigation in the top right.
posted by phunniemee on Jul 27, 2015 - 20 comments

Why Don't You....

The Twitter account Diana_Vreeland pays tribute to the celebrated fashion editor/social maven by coming up with colorful suggestions for how to live your life.
posted by The Whelk on Jul 23, 2015 - 16 comments

"odd and magical occurrences..."

Ever wanted to get lost in a piece of art or feel like you're inside an anime? LA-based art duo kozyndan posted an immersive "VR" experience of their 2009 Miyazaki-esque piece "Nakano In Spring". (More info on the original piece is here) [more inside]
posted by raihan_ on Jul 22, 2015 - 7 comments

Bibliophilia

Books in the films of Wes Anderson - a video essay.
posted by Artw on Jul 19, 2015 - 8 comments

Modern Square Kufic Tessellations

Islamic Geometric  — Shakil Akram Khan has taken the ancient art of Islamic calligraphic decoration to a whole new place.
posted by scruss on Jul 19, 2015 - 13 comments

"You can go wild on the wall, everything that comes to your imagination"

"The thing I find very exciting is waiting for the subway train and sometimes you'll get a glorious one that arrives decorated like a birthday cake!" Watching My Name Go By is a short 1976 BBC documentary about graffiti, artists, and graffiti artists in New York City. The film is based on Norman Mailer's 1974 essay for Esquire magazine, "The Faith of Grafitti." [via]
posted by Room 641-A on Jul 16, 2015 - 5 comments

Filmless Animation

Elliot Schultz creates mesmerizing embroidered zoetrope animations using turntables
posted by The Whelk on Jul 16, 2015 - 13 comments

Utah, get me two!

With designs inspired by Peking opera the facekini protects its wearer from jellyfish stings and sunburns.
posted by a lungful of dragon on Jul 16, 2015 - 38 comments

Auriculis midae non musica gratior ulla est

Cat Pianos, Sound-Houses, and Other Imaginary Musical Instruments "One might suppose that imaginary musical instruments, deprived of physical reality, have no place in the cultural histories and heritages that a museum of musical instruments aims to illuminate and preserve. Yet in their own strange ways, imaginary musical instruments exist. What’s more, they have not merely shadowed or paralleled musical life; they have formed a vital part of it, participating in ways that show the fragility of the distinction between imaginary and real."
posted by frimble on Jul 16, 2015 - 8 comments

Because The Internet Is Made Of Cats

“Trash Cat” by Kelsey Goldych is an animated short about cats and trashcans
posted by The Whelk on Jul 14, 2015 - 15 comments

Book Graphics

The Book Graphics blog collects thousands of gorgeous covers and illustrations, with special emphases on Russian artists, fairy tales, and antiquarian books.
posted by Iridic on Jul 14, 2015 - 5 comments

There's Antimony, Arsenic, Aluminum, Selenium...

The Dynamic Periodic Table... probably the only periodic table most of you will ever need, or want, to consult (aside from Tom Lehrer's musical version). What makes this periodic table different? Take it for a spin and find out!
posted by not_on_display on Jul 12, 2015 - 13 comments

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