119 posts tagged with Art and gallery.
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Robbing the Banksy

Was the pilfered painting worth it? Detroit's 555 Gallery saved a stencil from scrappers, but now wants to sell it.
posted by klangklangston on May 15, 2014 - 22 comments

fiction in the form of art gallery plaques

"Card Tricks by James Hannaham recommended by Jennifer Egan"
"By invoking the existence of artworks involving the gallery space, the people inside it, and the larger world (quite literally), Hannaham performs an ingenious reversal: the subject illuminated by the plaques ends up being us, the reader-viewers. And our experience of reading and viewing them—in what order we choose, in what state we’re in that day or night, in what company, in what mood, in what weather, is the narrative."
posted by davidstandaford on May 5, 2014 - 3 comments

JOGGING

JOGGING is a collaborative art Tumblr previously featured on Yahoo News and recipient of a Rhizome Art Grant. Cofounder and frequent contributor Brad Troemel recently had a show at the Zach Feuer gallery in New York, which prompted Art F City's Paddy Johnson to wonder: Does Brad Troemel's Internet Art Work in a Gallery Setting?
posted by shakespeherian on Mar 14, 2014 - 5 comments

"This is like the opposite of Vivian Maier"

(Warning: most links contain artistic nudes) In February, Chicago curator Paul-David Young announced a gallery show featuring found, sometimes nude self portraits from an unknown artist. Claiming to not know the identity of the artist, Young romanticized the unknown origins of the photos, implied the artist was impossible to find, and drew parallels with the Vivian Maier story. After some light digging, however, Animal New York was quickly able to identify the subject as digital artist Molly Soda, who has a popular presence on YouTube and Tumblr. [more inside]
posted by I Havent Killed Anybody Since 1984 on Mar 4, 2014 - 45 comments

Eye of the beholder

Nigerian photographer J.D Okhai Ojeikere passed away last weekend, but at the age of 83 he left behind a truly incredible body of work celebrating Nigerian culture. These photos from his Hairstyles series are part of an archive of nearly 1000 pictures showing the intricate hair-dos of African women taken at work, social engagements and in the streets of Lagos. The beautifully composed black and white images draw attention to the sculptural quality of the hair, almost elevating it to an art form in itself. It goes without saying that his work is a unique treasure of historical and anthropological importance.
Via
posted by infini on Feb 13, 2014 - 6 comments

Search the memory of The Netherlands

The Memory of the Netherlands is an image library making available the online collections of museums, archives and libraries. The library provides access to images from the collections of more than one hundred institutions and includes photographs, sculptures, paintings, bronzes, pottery, modern art, drawings, stamps, posters and newspaper clippings. In addition there are also video and sound recordings to see and listen to. The Memory of the Netherlands offers an historic overview of images from exceptional collections, organized by subject to provide easy access
Search 833928 objects from 133 collections from 100 institutions.
posted by infini on Jun 22, 2013 - 4 comments

Her hair color ....varies from blond to brunet across the collection

"Fabiola has been a beloved subject for countless painters, most of them amateurs. The portrait’s format is almost always the same: Fabiola is seen in profile facing left, her head covered by a rich red veil. Mr. Alÿs, who was born in Belgium in 1959 and moved to Mexico City in 1990, began collecting Fabiola paintings — as the genre is called — about 15 years ago, buying them at thrift shops, flea markets and antiques stores primarily in Mexico and Europe. He has previously shown his collection three times, when it was much smaller; the current presentation includes more than 300 works. Photos of the exhibition
posted by The Whelk on May 30, 2013 - 18 comments

Stupid for Art

So you’re at a gallery—now what?
The fact is, nobody knows what art is or why people make it. This is blatantly disturbing. Some say the function of art is to generate conversation—an unpleasant thought. I’m not sure we want to put art in the same category as skin disease and Carl Winslow: things to talk about on the internet.
This is why so many of us have a bad time at galleries: we try to make art Interesting when we should just let it be weird. Art should never be Interesting.
[more inside]
posted by the man of twists and turns on May 22, 2013 - 186 comments

International Art English

"The internationalized art world relies on a unique language. Its purest articulation is found in the digital press release. This language has everything to do with English, but it is emphatically not English. It is largely an export of the Anglophone world and can thank the global dominance of English for its current reach. But what really matters for this language—what ultimately makes it a language—is the pointed distance from English that it has always cultivated. " - Triple Canopy magazine on why do artists' statments and press releases sound so utterly odd and confusing.
posted by The Whelk on Apr 26, 2013 - 45 comments

But why is the girl in the ravishing red Lego dress so sad?

In Pieces, on display at the OpenHouse gallery in SOHO through March 17th. New York based LEGO sculptor Nathan Sawaya and Australian photographer Dean West (Warning: annoying Flash interface) create magic together. [more inside]
posted by misha on Mar 12, 2013 - 8 comments

Die Mauer fällt

Demolition is beginning (de) on part of Berlin's East Side Gallery (img, img, panorama) "...the 1.3km-long outdoor gallery, which is covered in paintings by artists from around the world, is now threatened by the city's strident advance of gentrification, with a significant section of it due to be dismantled soon to make way for a luxury block of flats." (en) [more inside]
posted by frimble on Feb 28, 2013 - 8 comments

Beating the pants off design hands down for best post it use

The Annual Post-It Show
posted by infini on Dec 8, 2012 - 2 comments

Michael Asher (1943–2012)

"Michael devoted his work to exploring the limits of the galleries and schools and museums that give context and space for art, poking at all sorts of barriers and shibboleths with a humor that was sometimes sly, and sometimes hilarious. He removed walls and doors and windows from galleries and museum spaces, letting in daylight and air, letting out preconceptions." Pioneering conceptual artist Michael Asher dies at 69 [more inside]
posted by wreckingball on Oct 16, 2012 - 7 comments

The Breaking Bad Art Project

The Breaking Bad Art Project is on exhibit at Gallery 1988 in Los Angeles through August 26. [more inside]
posted by Egg Shen on Aug 21, 2012 - 40 comments

Treasure in the Trash by Nelson Molina

One man's trash is another man's treasure — we've all heard the old adage, but Nelson Molina, a longtime sanitation worker in Manhattan, takes the saying to an entirely new level: a self-curated, full-fledged art gallery — from other people's trash. The New York Times toured Mr. Molina's gallery recently, getting a rare peek into the collection that contains everything from a Masters of Business Administration diploma (from Harvard!) to a portrait of Winston Churchill. Via
posted by infini on Jul 27, 2012 - 11 comments

Yamamoto Gendai

While researching the robotic sculptures of Kenji Yanobe (previously) I stumbled across this remarkable, eye-popping collection of artists at the Yamamoto Gendai. Enjoy...
posted by jim in austin on Jul 19, 2012 - 7 comments

The Gallery of Lost Art

The Gallery of Lost Art, from the Tate. Flash-intensive, autoloading, with background noise.
posted by the man of twists and turns on Jul 4, 2012 - 2 comments

“Buy my art . . . or I’ll kick your ass.”

Sponge-Fraud!: 'Artist Todd White seemingly had it all. With a multi-million-dollar art brand, collectors and clients ranging from Sylvester Stallone to Coca-Cola, and a burgeoning reputation in art-mad Britain, his days as lead character designer of SpongeBob SquarePants were but a distant memory. But, as David Kushner reports, when his confidante and gallerist Peggy Howell reported a burglary of his paintings at the hand of ninjas, things took a turn for the even stranger.' [more inside]
posted by the man of twists and turns on Jun 26, 2012 - 23 comments

'For five weeks, the sun will never set on a Hirst spot.'

Hundreds of 'spot' paintings by Damien Hirst are currently on display in 8 cities on three continents.
posted by xowie on Jan 14, 2012 - 96 comments

The Ballerina Gallery

The Ballerina Gallery
posted by Trurl on Aug 13, 2011 - 9 comments

Your Paintings.

Your Paintings a joint initiative between the BBC, the Public Catalogue Foundation and participating collections and museums from across the UK, is a website which aims to show the entire UK national collection of oil paintings, the stories behind the paintings, and where to see them for real. It is made up of paintings from thousands of museums and other public institutions around the country. Currently the archive contains 63,000 of the approximately 200,000 publically-owned artworks that make up the national collection. [more inside]
posted by dng on Jul 10, 2011 - 12 comments

Wet Hot American Gothic

In commemoration of the 10th Anniversary of the release of Wet Hot American Summer, Gallery 1988 in Los Angeles is presenting an exhibition of artwork inspired by the movie. Gallery (2) [more inside]
posted by schmod on Jun 15, 2011 - 68 comments

Simply Incredible

Stephen Biesty is an award-winning British illustrator famous for his bestselling "Incredible" series of engineering art books: Incredible Cross-Sections, Incredible Explosions, Incredible Body, and many more. A master draftsman, Biesty does not use computers or even rulers in composing his intricate and imaginative drawings, relying on nothing more than pen and ink, watercolor, and a steady hand. Over the years, he's adapted his work to many other mediums, including pop-up books, educational games (video), interactive history sites, and animation. You can view much of his work in the zoomable galleries on his professional page, or click inside for a full listing of direct links to high-resolution, desktop-quality copies from his and other sites, including several with written commentary from collaborator Richard Platt [site, .mp3 chat]. [more inside]
posted by Rhaomi on Feb 4, 2011 - 24 comments

"Bent and juxtaposed in ways that present the tension and dynamics of staged drama."

3D art made from book covers, by Thomas Allen.
posted by crossoverman on Jan 2, 2011 - 15 comments

Retro gaming, the Big Lebowski, Yoshi, and Twitter.

"Designed by Giant Robot head guru Eric Nakamura and his friend Len Higa, the car was stripped down and operated on extensively, with a simple goal in mind: transform this Scion car into one giant Nintendo Entertainment System. " The Scion Gallery and Giant Robot team up to curate "Pixel Pushers" a show about the 8-bit aesthetic. The Scion gallery's tour of the show.
posted by The Whelk on Dec 22, 2010 - 7 comments

Scary Sketches to Glimpse in the Dark

Nearly three decades ago, folklorist Alvin Schwartz published Scary Stories to Tell in the Dark, the first of three horror anthologies that would go on to become the single most challenged book series of the 1990s. But most of the backlash was against not the stories themselves (which were fairly tame), but rather the illustrations of artist Stephen Gammell. His bizarre, grotesque, nightmarish black-and-white inkscapes suffused every page with an eerie, unsettling menace. Sadly, the series has since been re-issued with new illustrations by Brett Helquist, of A Series of Unfortunate Events fame. Luckily for fans of Gammell's dark vision, copies of the old artwork abound online, including in these three image galleries: Scary Stories to Tell in the Dark, More Scary Stories to Tell in the Dark, Scary Stories 3: More Tales to Chill Your Bones. Interested in revisiting the stories themselves? Then don't miss the virtual re-enactments of YouTube user MoonRaven09, or the dramatic readings of fellow YouTuber daMeatHook.
posted by Rhaomi on Oct 29, 2010 - 48 comments

SF Car Gallery

San Francisco Vehicles Cropped to a Square. A cool, quirky gallery of over 100 vehicles parked in San Francisco, arranged by color (be sure to page through them all and notice the color transitions). Includes a few cool shots and a few WTF cars.
posted by mathowie on Apr 8, 2010 - 11 comments

The Cats' Portrait Gallery

The Cats' Portrait Gallery. Start at the ground floor and work your way up through twenty-five storeys of feline portraiture. [more inside]
posted by No-sword on Mar 28, 2010 - 18 comments

Arcangel and the future of digi/net art

Corey Arcangel is perhaps the internet's most infamous hack, masher-upper, digi/net artist. His work stands for a growing culture of artists who run wildly through animated GIF landscapes populated with corrupted data-compressed bunny rabbits and tinny, MIDI renditions of Savage Garden ballads. As the Lisson Gallery, London, opens its archives to Arcangel's curatorial eye, could digi/net art be set to infect the real, fleshy world, like a rampant Conficker Worm? Has YouTube become the truest reflection of our anthropological selves? Are we destined to roam the int3erw£bs like the mythic beasts of yore, hoping, in time, that digi art can free us from the confines of this fleshy void? [...previously]
posted by 0bvious on Dec 8, 2009 - 20 comments

The Gustavatory

Gustave Dore's engravings for the Old Testament. High quality enough to print. New Testament is here, though it's not nearly as exciting. Much of the rest of his work can be found here (The Raven, Rime of the Ancient Mariner, The Divine Comedy and so on), albeit in varying resolutions.
posted by BlackLeotardFront on Aug 31, 2009 - 32 comments

You Don't Have to be a Rockefeller to Collect Art

Herb & Dorothy Vogel is a documentary about a postal clerk and a librarian who amassed over 4000 works of conceptual and minimalist art on their modest income. Their only criteria: it had to be affordable, and it had to fit in their apartment.
posted by Extopalopaketle on Jul 31, 2009 - 33 comments

Visual review of art history

Are you looking to review your art history knowledge but find google too chaotic, and Prof. Christopher L. C. E. Witcombe's site is overwhelming and has a few too many dead links? Maybe wikipedia lacks the visuals you associate with an art history review, and Art cyclopedia could be a bit more straight-forward? Then The Art Browser might be the thing for you. The site combines brief descriptions of movements and artists from wikipedia, classifications from Art cyclopedia, and large images from Art.com for compact visual overview of art history. [via mefi projects] [more inside]
posted by filthy light thief on Mar 25, 2009 - 9 comments

SFMOMA ArtScope

SF artmuseum's zooming interface interesting collection, flash [more inside]
posted by hortense on Nov 7, 2008 - 2 comments

Bye Bye Blackboard

Blackboards were wiped after use: they were meant for immediate communication, not for record. Even as they were being used, their messages were continuously revised, erased and renewed. But when Einstein came to Oxford in 1931, he was already an international celebrity. After one of his lectures a blackboard was preserved and has become a kind of relic. It is the most famous object in this Museum. [more inside]
posted by Fizz on Jun 12, 2008 - 50 comments

The Grand Tour...in York

The Grand Tour is back, and this time it's in York. [Previously]
posted by djgh on Jun 6, 2008 - 9 comments

Smashing Magazine celebrates Pixel Art

Smashing Magazine has gone pixel mad with a celebration of the art form.
posted by Brandon Blatcher on May 5, 2008 - 21 comments

Ancillary Art

ANSI art gets the respect it is due. On January 12th, 2008, ACiD Productions produced an art show of legendary MS-DOS artists Somms and Lord Jazz. Their digital art was turned into hangable pieces using home-brew scrollable LCD light boxes hung on the gallery walls. [more inside]
posted by afx114 on Feb 19, 2008 - 24 comments

Where all good bumpers go to die

Sculptor John Kearney of Chicago and Provincetown and his wife Lynn have been running Chicago's Contemporary Art Workshop in a former dairy for almost 60 years. Unlike their better-known contemporary the Hyde Park Art Center, (founded nearly the same year) the pair never let the gallery move beyond its original mission, to discover and support young artists, especially those with little or no exhibition background. The Workshop had early solo exhibitions for both artists who went on to fame, and those whose careers fizzled (full disclosure-that would be me) and has exhibited thousands in its 6 decades. Kearney, who worked with found objects from early in his career, is the best-known sculptor you never heard of, with his creative and amusing bumper sculptures all over Chicago. [more inside]
posted by nax on Jan 29, 2008 - 6 comments

Stan The Man

I may not know art, but I know what I like. [more inside]
posted by sambosambo on Jan 16, 2008 - 24 comments

Do The Collage

When he's not recording more songs than Bob Dylan, former Guided by Voices frontman Robert Pollard is busy creating collages, many of which can now be seen online in an exhibit from Studio Dante in New York City. [more inside]
posted by dhammond on Dec 18, 2007 - 17 comments

Ripeness is All: Lustmord Portrayed in Oil

New York artist Ashley Hope's Ripeness is All exhibit at the Tilton Gallery recreates crime scene photographs of murdered women from the 1910s through the 1990s as oil paintings on huge 4' x 6' canvasses. [some nsfw art] [more inside]
posted by WCityMike on Nov 30, 2007 - 48 comments

A serious nocturnal photography habit.

The Nocturnes Gallery [more inside]
posted by carsonb on Nov 23, 2007 - 3 comments

"Teenage Stories."

"Teenage Stories." Award-winning photography by Julia Fullerton-Batten (flash). With interviews (pdf).
posted by Soup on Nov 21, 2007 - 15 comments

beyond the veil

A small gallery of talking boards and planchettes by various artists. (Warning: navigation is somewhat clunky.) [more inside]
posted by oneirodynia on Nov 1, 2007 - 2 comments

Hundreds of paintings, one masterpiece mural

Mural Mosaics! Artists come together to create beautiful themed murals, made of hundreds of relevant paintings. [more inside]
posted by iamkimiam on Oct 29, 2007 - 2 comments

Sugar and spice and nothing nice

"A paper around her neck said she was Ida, but Ida said nothing at all." So tells the story of the saddest, unluckiest girl that ever lived. [more inside]
posted by ZachsMind on Sep 6, 2007 - 17 comments

Art to Go

The Grand Tour. Until August 31st, the National Gallery in England is putting reproductions of famous paintings on the streets of London, with MP3 audio guides and maps available for download. The reaction has been good.
posted by djgh on Aug 5, 2007 - 22 comments

Walking - Cel Animation In The Real World

Walking is a crazy animation of a character walking around the walls of an art gallery, where each frame of the animation was painted on the walls & then wiped clean for the next frame. Via.
posted by jonson on Jul 6, 2007 - 30 comments

Collaborative ketchup art collection

KetchupArt.com. Submit your own. [via It's Knuttz]
posted by mediareport on Mar 6, 2007 - 4 comments

Edo period creepy crawlies

Japan's National Diet Library Gallery has been mentioned here before, but the Pink Tentacle blog came across some fantastic late Edo period illustrations in the NDL Gallery by Kurimoto Tanshu (栗本丹洲, 1756 - 1834). Apparently he was a doctor, but he seems to be better known for his hundreds of biological illustrations. Many are of sea creatures, but there are also quite a few other plants and animals. ranging from realistic renditions to bizarre creatures. A huge and varied collection, but all are equally fascinating.
posted by p3t3 on Dec 20, 2006 - 6 comments

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