6621 posts tagged with Art.
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Poses have power

But anyone who looked into the turbulent, shifting waters of Warburg’s actual beliefs knew that there was something more, and much stranger, there. At a minimum, there was something compellingly incongruous: on the one hand, his vision was haunted by half-clothed women dancing ecstatic Dionysian dances; on the other, it was devoted to minute archival research meant to record their choreography through time. [more inside]
posted by Athanassiel on Apr 8, 2015 - 7 comments

🌎? 🎨? 🎌?

Lizardpoint [PREVIOUSLY] used to host a decent amount of geography quizzes. If you haven't visited in a while, though, they've vastly expanded. So yeah, you can still kick yourself for not knowing where "Asia" is improve your knowledge of our great planet — but now you can also: quiz yourself on how to distinguish a stick figure from a the Vitruvian Man about the world of Art; learn to tell one crook from another identify world leaders and historical figures; become an expert in ugly dress patterns vexillologist. There's also weekly Geography trivia, study guides and timelines, and games for those of us who've had enough of being made to feel dumb kids. So prepare to boast about how smart you are in the comments section expand your worldly horizons!
posted by not_on_display on Apr 6, 2015 - 10 comments

3D on the rocks

CNC router+ice+whiskey= [more inside]
posted by sexyrobot on Apr 3, 2015 - 22 comments

Art in your browser tabs

A new Chrome extension retrieves a work of art whenever you open a new tab. The artwork can refreshed every day or in every tab.
posted by carter on Apr 3, 2015 - 18 comments

Safe for consumption

Gluten-Free Museum
posted by a lungful of dragon on Apr 2, 2015 - 25 comments

Occult Spaces

José Manuel Ballester removes the people from classical paintings, turning da Vinci's Last Supper into a still life, Goya's Third of May into a landscape, Géricault's Raft of the Medusa into a study of flotsam on an empty sea.
posted by Iridic on Apr 2, 2015 - 21 comments

I AM A COMPUTER - WOW LOOK AN OBLONG

The Puppets return for a lesson in computers and being a clever smart boy in DON'T HUG ME I'M SCARED 4.
posted by The Whelk on Apr 1, 2015 - 27 comments

Margret: Chronicle of an Affair – May 1969 to December 1970

The briefcase was found three decades after the affair took place. The contents of the suitcase: an extraordinary collection of found materials that chronicled the adulterous relationship between a businessman and his secretary in the late 1960s and 70s.
posted by ChuraChura on Mar 31, 2015 - 61 comments

"The explanation is the music."

Electronic musician Charles Cohen is interviewed for this year's Festival Présences Électronique in Paris, which follows with a roughly ten-minute clip of him performing (previously and more previously)
posted by a lungful of dragon on Mar 31, 2015 - 7 comments

"Those balls look right, they look good, and they're stayin'."

After controversy over a bull sculpture's genitalia the owner of a Hurricane, Utah restaurant removed the offending penis from his business' sign. In an interview (skip to 19:50) he made sure it was known he wasn't bowing to pressure and removed the penis for aesthetic reasons, and that the testicles are staying.
posted by edeezy on Mar 30, 2015 - 58 comments

Where cameras cannot go

After sketching combat in WWII, Howard Brodie drew the Watergate trial, Klaus Barbie, and Jack Ruby. Bill Robles drew Charles Manson and his followers, Roman Polanski, and the Unabomber. Richard Tomlinson drew "Son of Sam" and John Gotti. Elizabeth Williams illustrated the Central Park Jogger Case, Martha Stewart, the Times Square bomber. Aggie Kenny sketched Oliver North, Angela Davis, and the Gainesville Eight trial. They are all featured on The Illustrated Courtroom blog*, and Kenny and Williams were interviewed about their craft. Their book, The Illustrated Courtroom: 50 Years of Court Art, came out last year from CUNY Journalism Press. [more inside]
posted by Hypatia on Mar 30, 2015 - 10 comments

Trans 100 2015

The Trans 100 (pdf) is not an award ceremony. It is not a list of the “Best” or the “Most Important” trans people. It is not a popularity contest and there are many individuals absent from the list who are doing excellent work. More are no longer with us. To quote The Trans 100 Co-Founder Jen Richards, The Trans 100 “is an intentionally curated list of out trans people who are working on trans issues in the United States and having a positive impact.” [more inside]
posted by roomthreeseventeen on Mar 30, 2015 - 11 comments

Nebula with gas streams – cat fur, garlic powder, salt, flour, cumin...

Artist Creates Artificial Space Images Using Food Supplies
Brooklyn-based artist, Navid Baraty’s latest project “WANDER Space Probe” creates a fictional universe constructed from food and home supplies. Partially edible, Baraty’s photographs are made by arranging household items on a scanner. With the help of a pinch of sugar, cinnamon, flour, and a glass of coffee, Baraty produces stunning images of an alternate galaxy.

posted by moody cow on Mar 30, 2015 - 14 comments

What Women Want in Women Characters

Women Characters Redesigned by Women SFF Artists
As I said, I’m going to be discussing this at length in my next post. For now, I’m going to give you a flood of examples of women characters in fantasy art — many infamous for being depictions unwelcoming to women — that have been redesigned by the professional artists in the Women in Fantasy Illustration group. Each woman’s point of view is different, and the redesigns reveal what is most important to that woman, whether it’s realistic body armor, or it’s making sure the woman has a narrative and agency of her own. There is no one right way to depict a woman character, and it is not as simple as "cover her up more" because, as you'll see, some of these redesigns are sexier than the original. And I have found through my own work that you CAN absolutely have a single depiction of a character that is sexy and empowering to all genders. As I said, more on that next post.
[more inside]
posted by Lexica on Mar 29, 2015 - 69 comments

Bart and his flying dead zoo

Previously. Bart Jansen, the Dutch artist who charmed and disgusted the art world with his flying taxidermied cat Orville, has not been resting on his laurels since. After creating Orville, he went looking for bigger challenges... and found them. [more inside]
posted by Too-Ticky on Mar 29, 2015 - 11 comments

Pics or it didn't happen

How I taught my dog to text me selfies
posted by a lungful of dragon on Mar 27, 2015 - 18 comments

H₂WHOA!

Toshio Shibata’s Mesmerizing Photographs of Water [New York Times]
The Japanese photographer Toshio Shibata is fascinated by water — in particular, the way it interacts with man-made structures. For the later half of his almost-40-year career in photography, he has explored this relationship in novel ways, hiding horizon lines and taking the perspective of the water itself with his camera, visually evoking its rushing sound.

posted by Fizz on Mar 27, 2015 - 8 comments

Gender Diversity in All Its Colorful Glory

Drew Riley explores the visibility "explosion" for trans and gender-nonconforming people in gritty, vibrant portraits that capture the eye.
Transgender and gender-nonconforming figures rarely pop from the page quite like they do in artist Drew Riley's new collection Gender Portraits. Painted with splashes of bright color, full of dynamic movement or charged silence, and set against whimsical or brooding backdrops, Riley's portraits are nothing short of arresting. They pull the viewer in for a closer look — which is exactly the response Riley was aiming for, she tells The Advocate.
[more inside]
posted by Lexica on Mar 26, 2015 - 11 comments

Everything that happened was for both of us a prehistory of our future

In 1910 and 1911, Anna Akhmatova and Amadeo Modigliani were in love. She was a then-unknown Russian poet who would return to Russia and struggle within the Soviet system before being widely acknowledged as one of Russia's great poets; he was a mercurial artist who would be dead within 10 years, but whose art would capture the imagination of future generations. [more inside]
posted by julen on Mar 26, 2015 - 15 comments

Game of Thornes

A popular exhibit at the Art Intitute of Chicago is the Thorne Rooms, tiny historically accurate scale models of living spaces from all over the world. [more inside]
posted by bq on Mar 25, 2015 - 15 comments

Yuzen

Process of Yuzen - the creation of a kimono.
posted by a manly man person who is male and masculine on Mar 23, 2015 - 5 comments

Our Complicity With Excess

"[In] the face of a culture that would deny them, it becomes necessary for an artist of color in the west to defiantly announce to the world: I am a fact." In April 2014, at the first ever Yale Asian Alumni Reunion, Vijay Iyer delivered a powerful speech "on two intertwined issues: the role of Asian Americans as upwardly mobile minorities and the role of the artist as a potential transgressor within elite institutions."
posted by Errant on Mar 23, 2015 - 3 comments

I'm only happy when it...

Rainworks are positive messages and art that only appear when it rains. Peregrine Church watched a video showing off the properties of superhydrophobic coatings and got an idea uniquely suited to his environment: famously rainy Seattle.* Using a spray-on coating, he did a stencil at a bus stop. It's invisible in dry weather, but as rain hits it and the wet concrete darkens, the writing and art becomes clear. Since then, more have been added: tentacles, hopscotch grids, environmental messages, lily pads, and more. [more inside]
posted by wintersweet on Mar 21, 2015 - 35 comments

It's a Dance-Off!

In 2014, the Montreal Swing Riot hosted a dance-off: Lindy Hop dancers vs street dancers. Teams introduced themselves with a display of their own styles, then traded off dancing in their own style for a few sets. The fun part, though, was the next challenge: each team had to dance to the other's music on the fly. The results are well worth watching.
posted by sciatrix on Mar 20, 2015 - 21 comments

Design is hack.

Archillect, billed as The Ocular Engine, is a recent project from enigmatic designer Murat Pak. [more inside]
posted by Otherwise on Mar 20, 2015 - 4 comments

"What could be nicer? I draw funny pictures and people send me money."

Roy Doty, awesome illustrator, particularly known for drawing the popular, 50-year-running Wordless Workshop instructional comic strip for Popular Science, Family Handyman and syndication, the puzzle page for Make, and also the covers and illustrations for popular Judy Blume books Tales of a Fourth Grade Nothing, Superfudge and Otherwise Known As Shelia The Great, among many other things, has died at 92. This episode of the Danny Dee Show (YouTube 27m) shows off his drawing and narration skills. Here's some illustrations from his website. Here's a sample panel of Wordless Workshop. [more inside]
posted by JHarris on Mar 20, 2015 - 19 comments

Browser toys

Oskar Stålberg makes, among other things, nifty little toys to play with in your browser: Create a block of flats as your desire dictates! - Raise an archipelago from the sea floor by the force of pure will! - Where once there was nothing, bring forth a whole town! Via RPS; all links require Unity
posted by Dim Siawns on Mar 20, 2015 - 12 comments

Git to da choppah! screamed Ahnold

Famous scenes from R-rated films, done in a children's book style by Josh Cooley, an artist at Pixar.
posted by mathowie on Mar 18, 2015 - 42 comments

Making Music

This book is a collection of solutions to common roadblocks in the creative process, with a specific emphasis on solving musical problems, making progress, and (most importantly) finishing what you start.

posted by Sokka shot first on Mar 18, 2015 - 23 comments

Self Help Books You Wish Existed

Someone made his/her own self help books. [more inside]
posted by Ideefixe on Mar 18, 2015 - 51 comments

"I feel like my own identity was born in those cotton fields."

Victorian mourning dress embodies black history
"Vancouver artist Karin Jones has made a powerful installation about black history at the Royal Ontario Museum in Toronto.It’s a braided black Victorian mourning dress made from artificial hair extensions used by black women. Surrounding the dress on the floor are cotton bolls that contain the artist’s hair. I’ve only seen images the work online. Even so, I found myself really moved by the way it uses beauty to embody painful truths about slavery and the history of people of African descent in North America."

posted by Lexica on Mar 18, 2015 - 9 comments

Peaseblossom, Cobweb, Mote, and Mustardseed — in galvanized wire

Fantasywire: wire sculptures with a twist
Inspired by an inexplicable real life encounter, these galvanised or stainless wire sculptures make the perfect statement piece for the bottom of any garden. Every fairy is a handmade sculpture uniquely crafted to your desired pose and installation requirements.
[more inside]
posted by Lexica on Mar 14, 2015 - 19 comments

Let's go exploring!

Bill Watterson, the famously reclusive creator of Calvin & Hobbes, has given his longest interview to date, to be published in the exhibition catalog for the Billy Ireland Cartoon Library & Museum's exhibit, Exploring Calvin & Hobbes.
posted by overeducated_alligator on Mar 12, 2015 - 28 comments

I have no idea how these people got their stones wedged into their walls

Dry stone walls have been built since possibly as early as 5000 BC but can also be works of art.
posted by walrus on Mar 11, 2015 - 24 comments

A system that offers no resolution

The Sound of Empty Space is an installation by Adam Basanta that explores ideas around silence, amplification and feedback.
posted by frimble on Mar 11, 2015 - 8 comments

Art of a Life Time

So you think you're too old to make significant art. Or have too little training. Or what you want to build will take too long. Or maybe you just want to travel places that'll make your spine tingle. Here are eight artists to make you believe. [more inside]
posted by stoneweaver on Mar 10, 2015 - 9 comments

more weight than so much of what is printed on paper

Founded by celebrated poet and White House guest Kenneth Goldsmith, Ubuweb for years has been housing massive gigabites of work that exists outside the lines—from audio archives of rare performances by avant-garde musicians and video artists, known and unknown, to whole lifetimes of textual and interpretative work dug up and given new life online. -- Vice on how Ubu Publishes the Unpublishable. [more inside]
posted by Potomac Avenue on Mar 9, 2015 - 12 comments

the beauty of the visual arts for those unable to see them

“It’s an unbelievable sensation,” Mr. González said. “I’m feeling this painting down to the detail of each fingernail.” (SLNewYorker)
posted by joseph conrad is fully awesome on Mar 9, 2015 - 4 comments

Pour Some Sugar On Me

Naked people covered in honey (yeah, NSFW) are strangely beautiful. Who knew?
posted by cross_impact on Mar 9, 2015 - 54 comments

'I like art by men better.'

New York Magazine on MoMA's identity politics and gender balance. Art Basel Miami Beach gender balance by the numbers. The White Review on gender balance in the London gallery scene. Georg Baselitz in Der Spiegel:
As always, the market is right. [...] Women simply don't pass the test. The market test, the value test. Women don't paint very well. It's a fact.
Collectors still pay more for male artists. [previously]
posted by shakespeherian on Mar 7, 2015 - 29 comments

"There's something special about each and every Disney villain."

A japanese artist designs perfume holders based on villains from 19 Disney films.
posted by erratic meatsack on Mar 5, 2015 - 22 comments

"The accuracy of the sea came at the cost of the land."

That’s how I feel about the web these days. We have a map, but it’s not for me. So I am distanced. It feels like things are distorted. I am consistently confused. — Frank Chimero, on What Screens Want
posted by iamkimiam on Mar 5, 2015 - 31 comments

Phranc talk (with a P-H and a hard C)

Phranc, the self-described "All-American Jewish Lesbian Folksinger" has been a little quiet lately, but she's back with a new website and a new instrumental song. And if that wasn't enough, her entire solo catalog is now available on Bandcamp. [more inside]
posted by Room 641-A on Mar 3, 2015 - 8 comments

City of a Thousand Spires, One Of Which Has Giant Babies On It

A Tour of David Černý's Prague. David Černý is shaping Prague’s personality - one sculpture at a time. (previously)
posted by bq on Mar 3, 2015 - 5 comments

Urban Sketching: See the world one drawing at a time

The Urban Sketching Manifesto: 1. We draw on location, indoors or out, capturing what we see from direct observation. 2. Our drawings tell the story of our surroundings, the places we live and where we travel. 3. Our drawings are a record of time and place. 4. We are truthful to the scenes we witness. 5. We use any kind of media and cherish our individual styles. 6. We support each other and draw together. 7. We share our drawings online. 8. We show the world, one drawing at a time.
posted by MoonOrb on Feb 28, 2015 - 6 comments

Brother From Another Planet

“I’m always surprised to see what I do,” Jean-Luc Godard admits at the beginning of a talk delivered, nearly four decades ago, at Concordia University in Montreal. Could the single most influential filmmaker of his generation, who is still a provocateur at age 84, possibly be as baffled as we? [more inside]
posted by standardasparagus on Feb 28, 2015 - 7 comments

Iconic Images and their Photographers

Iconic Photographers Pose With Their Most Famous Photographs. [more inside]
posted by Deoridhe on Feb 27, 2015 - 14 comments

Volumes, lines, shadows and light have to obey my will.

When the Bauhaus art school opened in 1919, more women applied than men.
One woman who attended in 1927 was Amercan born Florence Henri who in the 1920's had moved to Paris.
However it wan't until she returned from a course at the Bauhaus, where she lived in the same house as Moholy-Nagy and became a close friend of his first wife Lucia Moholy and also where she met her lifetime companion Margarete Schall; that she took up photography.
She met Man Ray, Germaine Krull and the photographer André Kertész, developlng a very personal work, by using mirrors and prisms.
Her style oscillates between Bauhaus, Dadaism and Surrealism.
Photos NSFW Still lifes, and Nudes and Portraits.
posted by adamvasco on Feb 25, 2015 - 3 comments

Gresham College lectures

Gresham College has provided free public talks within the City of London for over 400 years.’ ‘Since 2001, the college has been recording its lectures and releasing them online in what is now an archive of over 1,000’ of them. Some examples: Snails in Art and the Art of Snails; The History of the Bowler Hat; “Speaking Scars” - The Tattoo; Mother Green Tree Frog and her Children: How Folktales Contributed to the Confucianisation of Korea; The Psychology of Doing Nothing; Möbius and his Band; Harmony in the Lowest Home: The Guitar and the Labouring Poor. [more inside]
posted by misteraitch on Feb 25, 2015 - 3 comments

Great Ideas (With Wheels)

"Bracket bolts the book open to the page 'LIFE, WITHOUT BIRTH AND WITHOUT END, EMITTING LIGHT!'"

A collection of tampered-with books for sale.
posted by glass origami robot on Feb 24, 2015 - 11 comments

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