6562 posts tagged with Art.
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Colorizing the gray area

Urban as art in suburban Moscow.
posted by found missing on Jan 1, 2007 - 12 comments

Recording history by whatever is handy

The white man brought disease, war and...accounting ledgers. The Plains Indian warrior switched from previous art materials and used the ledgers to create Ledger Art to record the glory of the hunt and battles between tribes and against whites. But as the Native American life deteriorated, Ledger Art recorded a vanishing way of life and the dramatic change in their culture. Some of that art has been lost or fallen apart, but The Plains Indians Ledger Art Website exists to preserve the images for the future.
posted by Brandon Blatcher on Dec 31, 2006 - 16 comments

Brass and bone sculptures of Jessica Joslin

Brass and bone sculptures of Jessica Joslin. From the FAQ: "Are they real bones? Some are, some aren't. I will continue to make it as difficult as possible to tell the difference..." Flickr set. [Bumped up a bit from this comment]
posted by mediareport on Dec 28, 2006 - 10 comments

Geostationary Banana Over Texas

Geostationary Banana Over Texas is an art intervention that involves placing a gigantic banana over the Texas sky. This object will float between the high atmosphere & Earth's low orbit, being visible only from the state of Texas & its surroundings. From the ground, the banana will be clearly recognizable and visible day & night; it will stay up for approximately one month.
posted by jonson on Dec 28, 2006 - 98 comments

painting with music

Visual acoustics is a concept for interactive expression.
posted by nickyskye on Dec 28, 2006 - 7 comments

a sequence of sequential art

A history of picture stories from 300 AD to 1929 and commentary. The evolution of speech balloons. Photos & drawings of early cartoonists. [via]
posted by nickyskye on Dec 26, 2006 - 11 comments

What good is an army of cats without armor?

Armor for cats and rats. Well, really it's cats and mice, but that doesn't rhyme as well.Token Samurai Cat Jeff de Boer, the artist (bio here) all links have been coralized to protect the webhost
posted by filmgeek on Dec 25, 2006 - 27 comments

Discover New Illustrators via Patchbox

Patchbox is an easy & fun way to discover online visual artists you may not have otherwise known. Each artist submits only an 80 x 80 pixel thumbnail, and if you like what you see, a clickthrough takes you to their gallery/homepage. Found via.
posted by jonson on Dec 23, 2006 - 13 comments

Uncompromising alternative

The art of Flavio Constantini. Naval officer turned anarchist Constantini (1926- ) paints rebels, martyrs, assassins, writers, and architecture, all with a special quality of light.
posted by Abiezer on Dec 23, 2006 - 4 comments

CGSphere.

The sphere. A simple object. Primitive. Round.
The CGSphere Project is simply this: What can you do with a round object in your 3D world?
Gallery here

Contributors have tried to create the most captivating 3d sphere, using their choice of software.
My favorites: My Precious. No Way Out. Solar Radiometer. Idea in a Cage. Sputnik. Hunter Killer. Don't Do it. mini adventure. Corals. Pin Ball. Spy Hole.
posted by filmgeek on Dec 23, 2006 - 19 comments

Stories of The Dreaming As Told Through Sight, Sound and Art.

The Dreaming (arguably better known as 'The Dreamtime') is more than just the story of how the world was created as told by Aboriginal Australians. It is also the basis for their way of life and death, their source of power in life and it tells of the life and influence of their ancestors on their culture. It was so important to Aboriginal Australians in the time before the white invasion of Australia that it was the one commonly held belief amongst a culture that consisted of over 500 different tribes (discussion of Dreamtime beliefs here). Thought to be the oldest continuously maintained cultural history on Earth, it is often presented as a series of inter-related stories explaining Aboriginal Australian origins and culture, such as how the Australian landscape was created or how the Mimi spirits taught them how to paint these stories on the walls of caves more than 40,000 years ago.

And what better way to learn of several of the many different Dreamtime stories than to listen and watch them being told by Aboriginal Australians elders themselves? And if that isn't enough Dreamtime mythology for you, here's some links to various sites which allow you to view Aboriginal rock art to see how these stories were translated into a form of artistic expression which is now five times older than the Egyptian Pyramids themselves.
posted by Effigy2000 on Dec 23, 2006 - 14 comments

Operation Fragmentation

The artists participating in Operation Fragmentation were given an unpainted vinyl doll (with a grenade shaped head) and an Army surplus ammo case and let loose to create what they wished. The results are really great, with the steampunk automoton, the peace dove & the explosive genie in a bottle being my three favorites.
posted by jonson on Dec 22, 2006 - 6 comments

Edo period creepy crawlies

Japan's National Diet Library Gallery has been mentioned here before, but the Pink Tentacle blog came across some fantastic late Edo period illustrations in the NDL Gallery by Kurimoto Tanshu (栗本丹洲, 1756 - 1834). Apparently he was a doctor, but he seems to be better known for his hundreds of biological illustrations. Many are of sea creatures, but there are also quite a few other plants and animals. ranging from realistic renditions to bizarre creatures. A huge and varied collection, but all are equally fascinating.
posted by p3t3 on Dec 20, 2006 - 6 comments

Beavers! (and CG)

From extra sheep and mountains in Brokeback Mountain, to flipping around shops and removing a leg in Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind, Buzz Image provides an extensive portfolio of their CG and FX work. And plenty of beavers.
posted by divabat on Dec 20, 2006 - 23 comments

"Your daily source for wonderful stuff."

Grandma's Kitchen (youtube), the Roller Toaster, the water-less washing machine, the sculptures of Gwon Osong, a crucifix-shaped mp3 player... some of the people and things found on CubeMe, a blog about "wonderful stuff".
posted by dobbs on Dec 20, 2006 - 13 comments

Death Never Looked this Delicious!

Drop Dead Gorgeous a Photo Gallery of not so safe treats by Daniela Edburg. (via the morning news)
posted by Dreamghost on Dec 20, 2006 - 45 comments

MySpace for artists

Meet Stuart, the new mySpace-like networking site for Student Artists created by Saatchi and Saatchi. (discovered through the NYT).
posted by jacalata on Dec 19, 2006 - 23 comments

A flash story

Days in a day [flash]. The story finishes once the notebook is completed.
posted by tellurian on Dec 18, 2006 - 6 comments

Penguins With Angst

Penguins With Angst is the visual tale of a group of hoodlum penguins who vandalize a grain silo & threaten the life of Santa Claus. Easter Sacrifice is a photostory of the kidnapping of the Easter Bunny & his eventual decapitation by the Dove of Peace. Both art projects courtesy of Exclusionary, the online gallery of Jasper Thomas' work.
posted by jonson on Dec 17, 2006 - 10 comments

I could give two spits.

Albert Reyes is an artist who saw a chicken in spilled water. He told the New York Times Magazine, "I could do that." The result? Spit art.
posted by landedjentry on Dec 17, 2006 - 21 comments

On your mark ... get set ... drawer

Drawer Geeks is an illustration challenge founded by Greg Hardin. Alternate Fridays, a group of 25+ professional animators, illustrators, cartoonists, and designers riff on a given fictional character. This past week's theme was Santa Claus. Among archived themes, I particularly liked: Medusa and The Grim Reaper. (via diminished Responsibility)
posted by madamjujujive on Dec 17, 2006 - 34 comments

Revved up like a deuce; another runner in the night

Volume --the most recent work by UnitedVisualArtists--is a sculpture of light and sound, an array of light columns positioned in the centre of V&A’s John Madejski Garden this winter.
posted by fandango_matt on Dec 16, 2006 - 9 comments

Goodbye, Lou.

In 1973, Berlin, Lou Reed’s somber follow-up to his upbeat, glam-rock Transformer, was described by Rolling Stone as “a disaster,” by others as “horseshit,” and was never performed live — until now.
posted by ijoshua on Dec 15, 2006 - 23 comments

Jesus Smurfing Christ!

La Pietà - In 1998, photographer Gregor Podgorski [translation] staged 500 different versions of the work of art made famous by Michelangelo. Ninety-six are available online, including such highlights as Anatomical Pietà, Librarian Pietà, Pietà In Hell, and, of course, Smurf Pietà. Most links NSFW.
posted by Partial Law on Dec 14, 2006 - 15 comments

Coffee nerds!

Is it possible to make truly excellent coffee or even espresso at home? Are fancy machines necessary? Dethroner is doing a theme week about coffee with a guestblogging pro coffee nerd dispensing some dense yet practical advice about beans and brewing. Don't miss the latte art video which makes it look so easy.
posted by the_ill_gino on Dec 14, 2006 - 29 comments

Ass painting

Art teacher in Richmond, VA suspended after his students found a video on YouTube of him painting with his ass.
posted by Nathanial Hörnblowér on Dec 14, 2006 - 41 comments

More fun than your to-do list

Palm Art Gallery and PalmArt.us showcase art created on PDAs.
posted by teleskiving on Dec 14, 2006 - 5 comments

Retro rockets: the good old days that never will be.

Mr. Smith Goes to Venuspart 1CC and part 2CC. Legendary space artist Chesley Bonestell shows us what family vacationsCC should have been like in Coronet Magazine, March 1950. [Click thumbnails for LARGE images.]
posted by cenoxo on Dec 13, 2006 - 20 comments

Superflat

Cal Henderson posted this link on superflat artist Chiho Aoshima this morning. With a little research, I found this excellent slideshow. And this, too. Then, I learned about superflat movement founder Takashi Murakami. And then I discovered this superflat commercial anime video.
posted by mongonikol on Dec 13, 2006 - 8 comments

Children's Illustration Archive

The children's book illustrators archive. Czeschka - Die Nibelungen; Nielsen - Hansel and Gretel; Goble - Japanese Fairy Tales; Dulac - Arabian Nights; Pavlishin - Folktales of the Amur; Finlay - The Ship of Ishtar; Detmold - The Arabian Nights; Crane - Flora Feast; Kirin - Croatian Tales of Long Ago; Clarke - Poe's Tales of Mystery and Imagination; Collard - British Fairy Tales, and; more Rackham in the gallery then you can shake a pen at.
posted by OmieWise on Dec 13, 2006 - 14 comments

Passes the Rorschach Test

The Daily Monster - Time-lapse videos of artist Stefan Bucher turning ink splotches into monsters. A new one every day. Also available on YouTube.
posted by Partial Law on Dec 12, 2006 - 13 comments

Pencil Sketches of Palomar Observatory

Russell W. Porter was an amateur astronomer who helped design the 200 inch telescope for Mount Palomar observatory. His pencil sketches of the finished mechanism are remarkably beautiful.
posted by jonson on Dec 12, 2006 - 15 comments

A title's pointless. Who wouldn't click on a link called that?

Architecture and the Velvet Fist of Happiness - click 'view the book" in the top left. {Flash, slight sound, NSFW}
posted by dobbs on Dec 11, 2006 - 9 comments

The Skies of December Turn Gloomy

The La Contessa, the Spanish galleon that roamed Lake Lahontan, is gone.
posted by fandango_matt on Dec 11, 2006 - 19 comments

Get The Lead Out

Pencil art isn't always about drawing. The first artist also uses nails. [previously]
posted by Partial Law on Dec 10, 2006 - 15 comments

I would like to take this opportunity to endorse the candidacy of Mr. Peanut for mayor of Vancouver.

We need more artists in politics! In 1969, Canadian performance artist Vincent Trasov constructed a human-sized peanut costume and took on the familiar identity of Planters mascot Mr. Peanut. Five years later, Trasov took his performance art persona to the next level as he entered Mr. Peanut into the 1974 Vancouver mayoral election, running on a platform of "Performance, Elegance, Art, Nonsense, Uniqueness, and Talent." Trasov posed a "visual question" to his opponents at the debates via tap dance, received at least one celebrity endorsement during his campaign, and in the end, garnered 3.4% of the vote. Recently, Trasov (and fellow artist Michael Morris) launched the Morris/Trasov Archive, where you can find a nice collection of photos from the campaign trail online (Performance -> My Five Years in a Nutshell).

Mr. Peanut remains a central part of Trasov's art; his "Histories" place Mr. Peanut in the Bamyian Valley of Afghanistan, the Marx-Engels monument at Berlin, and at the entrance to Thebes, playing the role of Oedipus opposite the Sphinx.
posted by duffell on Dec 10, 2006 - 11 comments

The living is easy

The Central City by Steve Tanza
posted by klangklangston on Dec 10, 2006 - 4 comments

A Love Story on the Streets

On December 5th, a Croatian man named Nico awoke to find a map his girlfriend had left him featuring a specific path she wanted him to take to work; along the way he saw stencils, paint, aerosol, collage wheat pastes & other art she had laid out in the pre-dawn hours letting him know how much she loved him. The sights Nico saw, in order, are collected here.
posted by jonson on Dec 10, 2006 - 80 comments

50 works of art you should see before you die

50 works of art you should see before you die, according to Guardian art critic Jonathan Jones and his readers--"probably the most learned cyber-community on the web." (Jones' personal top 20) [via; more inside]
posted by kirkaracha on Dec 7, 2006 - 67 comments

Romanesque Churches of the Bourbonnais

Bourbonnais. No, not Bourbonnais, IL, but Bourbonnais, a historic province in France that flourished during the eleventh and twelfth centuries. In this area there are hundreds of churches built in the Romanesque style.

In 2004 Stephen Murray, an art history professor, and his students recieved a $500,000 grant to document, process, and archive data from the churches into a digital database, all available online.
posted by provolot on Dec 5, 2006 - 13 comments

Attack of the Clones

Dutch artist Bert Simons, suffering from a mid-life crisis, decided to clone himself to become immortal. By means of state-of-the-art computer multiplication techniques he found a way for you to build your own Bert clone! (1.2 MB PDF) He is currently in the process to clone a female specimen. (NSFW: cardboard nudity) [via]
posted by kika on Dec 5, 2006 - 4 comments

Crayons as Art

Pete Goldlust creates crayon art, but it's not quite what you might be thinking. He also does playful wall installations, odd prints and other whimsical yet monstrous things.
posted by jacquilynne on Dec 5, 2006 - 7 comments

Laura Cooperman Carves Paper Into Art

Like the much mefi'd Peter Callesen, Laura Cooperman carves up plain white paper into extremely gorgeous intricate designs. Sadly, outside of her primary website not many examples of her work can be found online.
posted by jonson on Dec 4, 2006 - 6 comments

eBoy.

Web 2.0 pixel poster. From the shop of kickass pixel artist eboy (blog, with one nsfw image)
posted by delmoi on Dec 3, 2006 - 37 comments

Russian Psychoanalytic Art Mystery

"This was painted by a person with a rare and severe mental disorder. He was constantly seeing his own fantasies all around him. He also had a certain phobia..." (via Digg). The image is an imperfect reproduction of a particular postcard dated 1972. A blogger (in Russian) claims his psychiatry professor found one aspect of this eerie painting that reveals the patient's disorder. Allegedly, only one of his students in the past 15 years has figured it out. The psychoanalytic mystery has piqued the interest (in Russian) of the online community. A number of supplemental hints from the professor and thousands of guesses later, the case remains unsolved. Skeptics have already decried the mystery as a traffic-boosting hoax, but a few signs still point to its authenticity. Most notably, the artist's reproduction of another classic painting contains the following note: "transferred in 1990 from Moscow mental hospital."
posted by themadjuggler on Dec 3, 2006 - 113 comments

Mandelbrot on Fractals as A Theory of Roughness.

A talk with Benoît Mandelbrot, entitled Fractals in Science, Engineering and Finance (Roughness and Beauty) [video, 80mins, realplayer] about fractals as A Theory of Roughness.
posted by MetaMonkey on Dec 3, 2006 - 5 comments

Projekt "Map"

Das Projekt "Map"
posted by Tlogmer on Dec 1, 2006 - 18 comments

free video art to go

ArtPod --video art for your iPod, from Artnode Denmark
posted by amberglow on Dec 1, 2006 - 3 comments

Where's Walter? Beating a Dead Meme

Where's Waldo? Reflections on Copies and Authenticity in a Digital Environment. Consider for a moment The Work of Art in the Age of Digital Reproduction (JSTOR PDF here) by Douglas Davis. Alternatively, of course there is The Work of Art in the Age of Digital Reproduction (alternative link) by Robert Luxemberg. Not to be outdone, Charles Alexander Moffat recently added to the discussion with The Work of Art in the Age of Digital Reproduction. I hope all of the authors mentioned were able to make it to the ATA's fundraiser last year called The Work of Art in the Age of Digital Reproduction. Some people are willing to admit that it's not just all about the Benjamin^.
posted by illovich on Nov 29, 2006 - 12 comments

Pulp Fiction cover art

If you're a fan of pulp fiction paperback covers, then you've probably seen the artwork of R.A. Maguire. The Gallery on his personal site comes in three flavors: Covers, Reference Photos (to aid in cover renderings) and Original Art, which are essentialy covers stripped of the Title/Author/Publisher/Price info. via
posted by jonson on Nov 28, 2006 - 12 comments

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