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You Make Me Feel Like Dancin'

A Dramatic New Portrait of Leo Sayer "Leo Sayer is ebullient, passionate, and immensely talented. He is the ultimate people person, enthusiastically embracing life. A neighbour of his who is familiar with both my work and Leo's told me that Leo would be the perfect subject for a portrait. So I wrote and asked, it was as simple as that." Sadly, Tony Johansen's portrait of Leo Sayer didn't win this year's Archibald Prize. Then again, neither did this.
posted by Biblio on Apr 15, 2006 - 19 comments

The Lifelong Friendship Society

The Lifelong Friendship Society produces some comfortably disjointed art/video/music/writing that is sometimes incredibly cheesy. (quicktime is pretty much required for all these links)
posted by bigmusic on Apr 14, 2006 - 10 comments

WWWWJJDD!?

Happy "Good" Friday, MetaFilter. Why not spend some time today contemplating your extreme fanatical beliefs? From the good people at MungBeing.
P.S. watch out for the falling eggs.
posted by If I Had An Anus on Apr 14, 2006 - 19 comments

Celebs, Tattoo Artists, and Guitars

Six-String Masterpieces. Dean Guitars invites tattoo artists and musicians to decorate 50 Deans in a tribute to Dimebag Darrell. The results range from popstar kitsch to cronenbergian delight. Via Needled.
posted by frykitty on Apr 14, 2006 - 15 comments

Bomb Squad 64

Teenage art students in Portage County, Ohio tried to create a public art project by placing life-size "question boxes" from Super Mario Bros. around town. The result? The bomb squad was called in, and for a few days authorities contemplated pressing charges against the teens. (via wigu)
posted by XQUZYPHYR on Apr 14, 2006 - 61 comments

Dreams of Flying

Dreams of Flying. Whimsical photographs by Jan Von Holleben.
posted by Robot Johnny on Apr 12, 2006 - 28 comments

Ibsen Year 2006

How are you celebrating Ibsen Year 2006? Reading Henrik Ibsen’s plays? His poems? What about his paintings? There’s always Peer Gynt: The Videogame.
posted by jrb223 on Apr 12, 2006 - 12 comments

pop

Airigami, the art of folding air in specially prepared latex containers includes the flying octopus, giant soccer players, and many others. [via growabrain]
posted by Armitage Shanks on Apr 12, 2006 - 10 comments

A change of style

Robert Gregory Griffeth has deleted all of his galleries and in their place has posted these 12 enigmatic panels and a tracker (which, if accurate, tells me that there are a couple of hundred puzzled punters a day). [more inside]
posted by tellurian on Apr 11, 2006 - 15 comments

Bound & Determined

The Biliopegistic art. Athropodermic or otherwise you're bound to find something that suits your fancy. Or you could do it yourself. Or start a new career.
posted by Floydd on Apr 11, 2006 - 9 comments

Seven hundred hoboes.

The hoboes' time has come. Inspired by John Hodgman's book "The Areas Of My Expertise," The 700 Hoboes Project gathers pictures of hoboes. Some are better than others.
posted by EarBucket on Apr 11, 2006 - 20 comments

Rock & roll artist

Laura Levine's works are themed around music, from her classic rock photos to her funky illustrations. Her children’s illustrated books about musical pioneers are delightful: Honky-Tonk Heroes & Hillbilly Angels is due out in May. Previously: Shake, Rattle & Roll and a collaboration with the B-52's, Wig! She also runs a curiosity shop in Phoenicia, NY. (via Internet Weekly)
posted by madamjujujive on Apr 11, 2006 - 2 comments

I am still alive.

I am still alive. Japanese conceptual artist On Kawara sent these telegrams to friends throughout the 70s. He's most famous for his date paintings, in which he paints the day's date on canvas before midnight. His book series I Met is a 12 volume list of the people he met in the '60s and '70s. His ten volume One Million Years (Past and Future) comprises books with every one of 1,000,000 years (998,031 BC-1969 AD (past) and 1980-1,001,980 AD (future) listed. Reading One Million Years is a series of installations of readings from the books. One was placed in Trafalgar Square, and in a further wrinkle in time, this guy caught it with his pinhole camera. Here is a short essay about Kawara's existentialism, and here's a longer essay (Google cache) about Kawara's art's ontology. (PDF)
posted by OmieWise on Apr 10, 2006 - 51 comments

For the well-tempered pianist

An interactive Shockwave-based look at Bach's Well-tempered Clavier. Go one level up and explore the entire coverage of Bach.
posted by Gyan on Apr 10, 2006 - 14 comments

Rockwell Forgery Uncovered

For years, art critics were stumped by the inconsistencies in one of Norman Rockwell's most famous paintings for the Saturday Evening Post, Breaking Home Ties. The colors weren't as vibrant as his usual work, nor did the clothes hang correctly. Perhaps most telling, the expression of wistful longing on the face of the protagonist didn't feel right. Two weeks ago, the reasons why became clear. (more inside)
posted by jonson on Apr 8, 2006 - 35 comments

"To all our sisters who have committed suicide or who have been institutionalized for their rebellion."

"To all our sisters who have committed suicide or who have been institutionalized for their rebellion."
Throughout her career, but especially in her latest and most wrenching work— Sisters, Saints, & Sibyls, the 39-minute three-screen lamentation that is a duel memoir of her sister's suicide at the age of 19 and her own mortifications of the flesh and battles with addiction—the photographer Nan Goldin has been one of the great living suicides of recent art history... Charles Baxter wrote that novelist Malcolm Lowry captured "the way things radiate just before they turn to ash." At her best Goldin does this too.
posted by matteo on Apr 7, 2006 - 10 comments

Prepare for the home-made invasion!

Robots, rockets, and rayguns, oh my!
posted by Robot Johnny on Apr 7, 2006 - 11 comments

Just shoot and shake!

The Polaroid Photography Collective has a number of links to some great galleries. The multi-shot panoramas are especially nice. {some images may be nsfw}
posted by dobbs on Apr 6, 2006 - 9 comments

Bob Ross Video Game

A video game "based on Bob Ross' creative, unique and easy to learn painting techniques and TV show properties" is coming to the next-generation Nintendo system.
posted by AloneOssifer on Apr 5, 2006 - 31 comments

"Ten Favorite Offbeat Musicals"

"Ten Favorite Offbeat Musicals" by Jonathan Rosenbaum
posted by matteo on Apr 4, 2006 - 30 comments

My Dad's got Asteroids.

Vintage arcade artwork. In free, vector goodness. For collectors restoring a piece of arcade history and enthusiasts who want to create some great art to hang in the den. Who doesn't want a giant Q-Bert on their wall?
posted by punkfloyd on Apr 4, 2006 - 25 comments

Sugar babies

Sugar babies made of marzipan.
posted by crunchland on Apr 3, 2006 - 33 comments

Saint EOM

Pasaquan: Eddie Owens Martin, pot-smokin', homo hustlin' New York transplant, son of a Georgia sharecropper falls ill, sees visions, "becomes" Saint EOM, spends 30 years turning homestead into grand work of art, commits suicide, languishes in semi-obscurity...
posted by visit beautiful mount weather! on Apr 1, 2006 - 6 comments

Nomi

Nomi I just discoed Nomi. Here, here and here( that site is broke in way that I think is some sort of artistic statement. Or it could be just bad html.) I was a teenager then and had never heard of him, but I'm strangely impressed. He's a bald Gary Numan, he's like the Cirque du Soleil playing bluegrass.
posted by nyxxxx on Mar 31, 2006 - 34 comments

Little Beauty

Loes Modderman's Science Art
Beautiful microscopic art, often striking similar to some modern art. Dig the abstract crystal images: cholesterol, crystal landscapes, vitamin c is psychedelic. Explore the sands of the world! Bubbles are pretty, plastics rock, fluids are minimalist. (via)
posted by MetaMonkey on Mar 30, 2006 - 5 comments

happy happy happy

When all else fails, go to your happy place.
via BLDGBLOG
posted by signal on Mar 30, 2006 - 25 comments

Other loves
still breathe deep inside me.
This one's too short of breath even to sigh.
"First Love", by Wislawa Szymborska. (via the Daily Poems of poems.com)
posted by matteo on Mar 29, 2006 - 19 comments

Good teenagers, take off your clothes!

Are Satanic messages hidden in Catholic art? According to the new documentary Rape of the Soul [embedded Quicktime], the answer is, "so completely yes that you could shit." Featuring such experts as Wilson Bryan Key and Judith Reisman, this movie will literally, physically blow your brain apart by cutting little holes in classic art that might conceivably look like three sixes if you arrange them properly, or maybe finding a small patch of red and black that could look like a lumpy Devil head if you're looking for one and squinting. [via]
posted by Sticherbeast on Mar 28, 2006 - 64 comments

Oh Mr Hart!

Australian artist Pro Hart has died. Hart used DNA in his paintings to foil counterfeiters. Sometimes he painted with a cannon, other times with a plane.
posted by tellurian on Mar 27, 2006 - 16 comments

Stuckism

Soft Fury Monsters with Hard Pink Genitals and other oddities of Stuckism.
posted by dios on Mar 27, 2006 - 33 comments

'Study, study, and study, to overtake and surpass the capitalist world!' - K.Radek

The Parade of the Red Army and other scans of Soviet Children's Books from the '20's and '30's. [via DaddyTypes]
posted by anastasiav on Mar 27, 2006 - 14 comments

Reilly Stroope

Illustrations by Reilly Stroope. (Flash interface.)
posted by Gator on Mar 26, 2006 - 11 comments

Surreal

The truth is what you believe [flash game] I'm stuck with a matchstick with a number on top [found in the fabulous Surreal & Visionary Artists of the 21st Century].
posted by tellurian on Mar 26, 2006 - 15 comments

Apparently there is an uncanny valley in Japan, too.

The tradition of making Japanese dolls, called ningyo—meaning human figure—goes back as far as 10,000 years to clay figures made during the Jomon period. The more recent rise in popularity, though, is most often traced to Hina Matsuri--Girls' Day, or the Doll Festival, celebrated on March 3--originating during the Edo period. These antique ningyo are highly sought after by collectors, such as the American expert Alan Pate, who has written a number of articles on the subject. The modern Japanese doll culture, however, is anything but traditional. In the late 19th and early 20th centuries, the ningyo tradition was exported to make toys for the West (previously featured on MeFi), and has culminated in popular Barbie-type dolls such as Superdollfie and others. Contemporary artists have transformed the Japanese doll tradition into something else entirely: Simon Yotsuya, Ryo Yoshida, Koitsukihime, Yoko Ueno, Mario A., Etsuko Miura, and Kai Akemi. A number of these artists were featured in the Dolls of Innocence exhibit at the Museum of Contemporary Art Tokyo. Of course, notable artists outside Japan have worked with dolls before, including Hans Bellmer, who inspired much of the artwork in Innocence, the follow-up to Ghost in the Shell. Explore more: [1] [2] [3] [4] [5]. [Several links are nsfw.]
posted by monju_bosatsu on Mar 24, 2006 - 11 comments

Moonlight, Baghdad.

A Dweller in Mesopotamia. Donald Maxwell was Official Artist to the Admiralty during World War I, and the end of the war found him in what was then called Mesopotamia (now Iraq); he compiled the sketches and paintings he did there into a book which Project Gutenberg has put online. I'm posting it for the frequently beautiful images, but the text is interesting too. He says Baghdad and Basra don't live up to the Westerner's romantic preconceptions ("The first general impression of Basra is that of an unending series of quays along a river not unlike the Thames at Tilbury"), but he also describes age-old scenes that are now gone for good. (Via wood s lot, one of the few sites I visit every day.)
posted by languagehat on Mar 24, 2006 - 9 comments

The Ted Kierscey Collection

The Narrow Gauge Circle hosts, among other fine features, the Ted Kierscey Collection -- page after page after page of historical photographs of Colorado's railroad and mining towns.
posted by Gator on Mar 23, 2006 - 7 comments

Chicano/Mexican/Latino-Art

Cheech has become a minor force behind a movement that has been expresed in many different ways.
posted by snsranch on Mar 22, 2006 - 11 comments

MOM SHOOTS!

The ATF has sponsored an art contest for the children of its employees. Some of the children depicted their parents as heroes. Others seemed to tell a story that’s a bit more grim. Still others were truly elliptical or perplexing. Oh, and the turtle. [via.]
posted by dersins on Mar 22, 2006 - 48 comments

He has cavorted naked with Charlotte Rampling [this is VERY NSFW] and covered himself in caviar for Marc Jacobs, but Jürgen Teller thinks "fashion is a wank". Teller's first solo show in Paris is entitled "Nurnberg", it consists of a sequence of images (annoying Flash site, sorry) taken at the infamous Zeppelintribune parade ground, site of Nazi propaganda rallies, which was designed by Hitler's favourite builder, Albert Speer. Over several months, Teller (.pdf) has photographed the monument, the podium and the steep, ruthless steps, all of which have been left to decay. Or not. "It wasn't really maintained, but if there was a broken step, or a smashed wall, it would be mysteriously replaced with a new one." Teller's photographs show the delicate weeds, flowers and lichen [NSFW] that have grown up around the stone blocks. "In Germany, there is a saying about letting the grass grow over things, meaning that events will eventually be forgotten".
posted by matteo on Mar 22, 2006 - 19 comments

Universal Connections

For those lacking a little extra USB in their lives: Universal Connections.
posted by signal on Mar 22, 2006 - 20 comments

Tom Judd's Everyday

Tom Judd's Everyday - "365 PAGES AGO I HAD A VERY SILLY IDEA. Draw a page everyday for one year. Each day I spent around 1 hour on the page, sometimes more, sometimes less. There was never any planning or preparation, I would just go at it whenever I had a spare moment in my day and had something I needed to write or draw. Some of the drawings are observational and some are just plain weird. Monsters and things seem to crop up a lot (robots too)."

Also of note...in 2006, Tom Judd is undertaking a "Once A Week: Art vs Advertising" project...
posted by tpl1212 on Mar 21, 2006 - 19 comments

Two or Three Things About David Cronenberg

Three new ways of thinking about David Cronenberg (director of Videodrome, Dead Ringers, etc.). A documentary filmmaker, an avant-garde filmmaker, or maybe just a guy who looks at couples and probably wonders what they look like having sex. Kind of par for the course.
posted by Joe Hutch on Mar 20, 2006 - 45 comments

A portrait an artist makes usig himself or herself as its subject...

Self-portrait: A portrait an artist makes using himself or herself as its subject, typically drawn or painted from a reflection in a mirror. There are many famous painted self portraits, but now that everyone has a digital camera, more and more photographic self portaits are popping up everywhere. Whether you think of it as vanity, narcissism, self-invovlment, or just art, it is hard to deny that there are a lot of interesting and well-composed shots out there. Sure, there are plenty of arm-length camera angles, but there is also work being done with black and white images, hands and feet, and, of course, eyes. Even photoshop is used sometimes. People are still speculating on what exactly all these pictures mean, but I think it is clear that from totally innocent to intensely personal to NSFW, self portraits are here to stay.
posted by nuclear_soup on Mar 20, 2006 - 14 comments

The Biggest Collection Of Full Cigarette Packs In The World

Igor Sergeev has been collecting full, unopened cigarette packs from all over the world since 1976. His site now features over 21,000 photos, arranged in alphabetical order by brand name. Some are fascinating simply for the way they differ from what we're used to seeing at the 7-11; others are straight-up nine kinds of awesome.
posted by Gator on Mar 20, 2006 - 38 comments

Going Once... Going Twice...

Money on the Wall: PostMichael McKeeism meticulously perfects the art-form that Warhol dreamed of, The Who toyed with, and and others are desperate to avoid. Transactionism is an observation of art, the artist/patron relationship, and our own values, such as they are.
posted by hermitosis on Mar 19, 2006 - 7 comments

Fine print: tiny tomes

2-inch books (flash) is a delightful exhibit of tiny hand-crafted books. The 2005 winners (pdf) of the Miniature Book Society's annual competition offers a sampling of little books that have been published. Tiny tomes have been delighting readers and collectors for 4,000 years. If these tiny treasures intrigue you, perhaps you'd like to collect your own vintage or contemporary library.
posted by madamjujujive on Mar 18, 2006 - 11 comments

William Blake's Grave.

William Blake's Grave. Museums and galleries only have a few weeks left to save William Blake’s long-lost watercolour illustrations accompanying Robert Blair’s poem “The Grave”, before they are dispersed at auction in New York on 2 May.
posted by matteo on Mar 17, 2006 - 25 comments

what's that smell?

Blood & Bacchanalia: Hermann Nitsch and the Viennese Aktionists (links are NSFW). High weirdness and ritual debauchery, 1960s Austrian style.
posted by visit beautiful mount weather! on Mar 16, 2006 - 18 comments

What is wrong with fake ??

Real good, fake bad ... but, why ?
posted by Brainstormer on Mar 16, 2006 - 29 comments

popular artists

Pleasing to the eyes. Degas once said that “its essential to do the same subject over again, ten times, a hundred times" but it looks like it took him at least four hundred times. Artst.org is a nice and simple resource with high resolution paintings by picasso, matisse, degas, and okeefe as well. Its fun to browse by date.
posted by petsounds on Mar 15, 2006 - 14 comments

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