6530 posts tagged with Art.
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Here I Dreamt I Was an Illustrator

The Art of Chris Turnham. Vivid, highly-stylized illustrations. The first four 2D images are part of a series that depict scenes from Decemberists songs.
posted by ludwig_van on Jan 16, 2006 - 7 comments

The inside of my dollhouse is finished at last!

Fantastically obsessive & detailed recreation of Bag End (Bilbo's home from The Hobbit) in dollhouse scale. Pictures from the start of the project here.
posted by jonson on Jan 15, 2006 - 14 comments

Art for a Sunday

Two completely dissimilar yet nifty artists: The twisted ink drawings of Jon Kuta (big enough to make desktops; Flash interface), and the fabulously lifelike driftwood and bronze sculptures of Heather Jansch (she really likes horses. Warning: you'll have to side-scroll).
posted by Gator on Jan 15, 2006 - 11 comments

Mimmo Rotella's decollages

The World in Pieces. During the early 1960s, Mimmo Rotella (who just died in Milan at age 87) went around Europe collecting strips of advertising posters that had been pasted over and torn away many times. He also tore at posters (warning: big file) himself in a rebellious act of desecration to create the works he called decollages. More inside.
posted by matteo on Jan 14, 2006 - 4 comments

rickshaw art

The Ricksha Arts of Bangladesh "This website is dedicated to celebrating one of Bangladesh's unique popular arts, the paintings and decorations on the three-wheeled cycle rickshaw"
posted by dhruva on Jan 10, 2006 - 10 comments

National Center for Jewish Film

"One could go on, and one will -- praising (...) the National Center for Jewish Film for releasing all four of Edgar Ulmer's Yiddish films in restored editions. But the DVD player is beckoning, and I think it is time for me to get back to the couch".
The National Center for Jewish Film (NCJF) is a unique nonprofit motion picture archive, distributor and resource center housing the largest, most comprehensive collection of Jewish-theme film and video in the world. In their archives you can discover the works of Leo Fuchs, the "Yiddish Fred Astaire", restored gems (scroll down) like "Motl the Operator" and re-releases like "The Life and Times of Hank Greenberg". (More on Greenberg, the Jewish kid who challenged Babe Ruth’s homerun record here, more on the NCJF inside).
posted by matteo on Jan 9, 2006 - 9 comments

Historic manuscripts

Ancient Manuscripts from the Desert Libraries of Timbuktu.
Rolled Palm Leaf Manuscripts in Nepal.
Rome Reborn: The Vatican Library & Renaissance Culture.
Lots of beautiful images and fascinating information, courtesy of the wonderful plep.
posted by mediareport on Jan 7, 2006 - 12 comments

PictureAustralia

PictureAustralia lets you search across the image collections of a bunch of (mostly Australian, but a few international) cultural agencies. It's been running in various forms since 1998 and has just started accepting contributions through the Flickr groups PictureAustralia: Australia Day and PictureAustralia: People, Places and Events. [via Stuff v.3]
posted by d-no on Jan 6, 2006 - 4 comments

Hardbody Art

Athletes and their tattoos. If you've got it, flaunt it.
posted by mono blanco on Jan 5, 2006 - 21 comments

Snarg

Snarg: Random Flash Art. Is it Friday yet?
posted by bigmike on Jan 5, 2006 - 4 comments

Using fine-art images to promote movies

Using fine-art images to promote movies: "But it was Mr. Kessell's "Florilegium" (or "collection of floral images") daguerrotypes that caught Mr. Palen's eye: each image is close-up of a surgical instrument, so poetically rendered that it seems almost organic. Some of the macabre implements resemble exotic flowers. One, from a distance, could be mistaken for the horns of a gazelle. "We were sort of blocked, and all the pieces fell into place once I saw that image," Mr. Palen explained. A deal was made to use that daguerreotype [to promote the upcoming Tarantino-produced film "Hostel"], which actually shows a surgical clamp. [The poster] now appears in theaters and on widespread promotions. [Side: direct WMV link of Tarantino spazing out while introducing "Hostel's" director Eli Roth at a festival.]
posted by JPowers on Jan 4, 2006 - 12 comments

Pixels for you, pixels for me.

Random Screen is a mechanical thermo dynamic display which does not rely on any electricity. Stuff you learnt in school helps!
posted by riffola on Jan 3, 2006 - 18 comments

Cyclorama for Sale

A copy of the Gettysburg Cyclorama is for sale if anyone has the $2-$3 million it is expected to cost, and more importantly, somewhere to put it. It is one of four copies originally painted. This copy was found in a burned-out Chicago Warehouse in 1965 so maybe there is still hope to find the Second Battle of Manassas cyclorama. One other copy of the Gettysburg Cyclorama exists and is being restored at the Gettysburg National Military Park. [mi]
posted by marxchivist on Jan 1, 2006 - 13 comments

Talking Letters

Webctionary Using typography as comic art. Portuguese version by the same creator.
posted by divabat on Dec 31, 2005 - 10 comments

19th century medical caricatures

A nice collection of 19th century French and English medical caricatures, including some drawn by George Cruikshank.
posted by iconomy on Dec 29, 2005 - 8 comments

Children's art and the tsunami

Roar: through the eyes of children, one year later, children's artistic responses to the Boxing Day Tsunami of 2005.

Meanwhile baby Tsunami turns one
posted by Rumple on Dec 26, 2005 - 10 comments

Data = Art

distellamap is a series of graphical representations of the code and data in Atari 2600 game cartridges, created using the Processing programming language. The results are rather pretty. Also by the same author: mario soup, a representation of the sprites in Super Mario Brothers. (via artificial.dk)
posted by whir on Dec 23, 2005 - 17 comments

poketo.com vinyl wallets

poketo.com's limited vinyl wallets might be the perfect last-minute gifts.. sweet designs by lots of fancy design and art people (links and infos to everyone of them too), e.g. derek kirk kim had 3 designs (take a look at the sold out designs by clicking on "archive" and "sale")
posted by suni on Dec 22, 2005 - 63 comments

World Art

World Art Treasures :What is essential in my approach consists of not "letting the others profit," as is too often thought, but to PROFIT ALONG WITH OTHERS from the dual experience of my studies and travel, sharing the emotions of my discoveries and encounters, to maintain faith in this miracle that is life. J-E Berger .
posted by hortense on Dec 21, 2005 - 2 comments

Freaky Deaky!

Shadowmechanics - Appropriately apocalyptic scenes for these end times. Artwork/Illustration by Harry Halme. A definite preponderance of nightmarish creatures and reapers to suit the mood of the last few day's political landscape. I found this at SpartanDog.
posted by spicynuts on Dec 21, 2005 - 17 comments

Alvin Lustig

The Alvin Lustig Archive - "Alvin Lustig's contributions to the design of books and book jackets, magazines, interiors, and textiles as well as his teachings would have made him a credible candidate for the AIGA Lifetime Achievement award when he was alive...Lustig created monuments of ingenuity and objects of aesthetic pleasure." The archive collects over 400 examples of his book, architectural, and ad-design work (see also AIGA's list of Lustig's Top-10 designs). Via HOW magazine...
posted by tpl1212 on Dec 20, 2005 - 5 comments

The Making of King Kong

King Kong's Post Production Diary - videos of weekly progress, on all aspects of filmmaking, starting from the first day of post-production, upto the premiere.
posted by Gyan on Dec 19, 2005 - 18 comments

The Art Of War

At least one commander told him, "Follow the soldiers' instructions, because they'll put their lives at risk to save you." But no one tried to censor his drawings or discourage him from going out on missions. -- Steve Mumford is a New York painter who was embedded as a "combat artist" in Iraq. The archives of his Baghdad Journal make for fascinating reading. He has recently published a large book of the art he created on this voyage.
posted by Gator on Dec 18, 2005 - 9 comments

sweet..... free culture

Web Gallery of Art - "The Web Gallery of Art is a virtual museum and searchable database of European painting and sculpture of the Gothic, Renaissance and Baroque periods (1100-1850), currently containing over 14.500 reproductions. Commentaries on pictures, biographies of artists are available. Guided tours, free postcard and other services are provided for the visitors."

Direct Links seem to be turned off.... lame, but the search function is worth checking out. One of the coolest features is being able to search for artists based on country, style, or time period.
posted by sourbrew on Dec 17, 2005 - 14 comments

The Parking Project

The idea behind the Parking art project is pretty simple: once you throw some coins in the meter, you can do pretty much anything with a parking space, right? Rebar decided to try converting some vehicle space into a community space, by laying sod, adding benches and a tree, then letting people enjoy the space for a few hours. [via treehugger]
posted by mathowie on Dec 17, 2005 - 32 comments

Ballerina's feet

Work from Esao Andrews [some NSFW] Includes photography, painting, drawing, sculpture and more. All presented in a quite elegant, uncluttered interface.
posted by tellurian on Dec 15, 2005 - 14 comments

"an arch gesamtkunswerk dedicated to the conceit of a museum of homelessness"

The Homeless Museum.
posted by scody on Dec 15, 2005 - 16 comments

Sir John’s House of Curiosities

Sir John Soane (1753-1837) was responsible for the design of quite a few of London’s public buildings (and to some extent, its phonebooths). His home, now a museum, is filled to the brim with architectural relics, sculptures, paintings, drawings, stained glass, and assorted curiosities. Almost unchanged since his death, it also contains the gravesite of his wife’s beloved dog Fanny, a mummified rat, an Egyptian sarcophagus, and an imaginary monk named Padre Giovanni. Best of all, on the first Tuesday of every month the museum has a candlelight tour which enhances the spooky splendor of the rooms.
posted by annaramma on Dec 15, 2005 - 18 comments

Paper Art and Architecture

Yee is a Canadian Artist. His company Yee's Job is located in Montreal. He designs & handcrafts all kind of paper craft, such as a working V-8 engine made of paper, a paper biplane clock, the Cathedral at Notre Dame and more.
posted by mr_crash_davis on Dec 14, 2005 - 15 comments

Lars Arrhenius

Enjoy the interactive art work of Lars Arrhenius. "Arrhenius often uses pictographs, the kind of stereotypical figures and universal symbols seen on public information signs. A direct use of media, and a judicious blend of austerity and irony are typical of his work. The digital characters in his animation, The Street, create an exaggerated view of daily routines, where each individual contributes to keep things going like an anonymous cog in the machine of life." Complete bio (along with additional artworks) here. Flickr slideshow of his work here.
posted by JPowers on Dec 14, 2005 - 9 comments

"Kidney dialysis is no fun."

"At Ceiling Scenes, we believe the ceiling has a fundamental right to take part in the ambiance of any interior space." -- From their catalog (.pdf). Personally, I think tin ceilings are much more nifty, but I can see how these photographic tiles could really brighten up a dull office or classroom. Too bad they're so cagey about actually telling you how much they cost...
posted by Gator on Dec 14, 2005 - 20 comments

Smithsonian Cover Art

Cover Art: The Time Collection [Flash] "In 1978 Time Magazine gave to the National Portrait Gallery some 800 works of original art that had at one time or another appeared on its covers." The gallery has created an online-only exhibition of the covers (the museum is closed for renovation until July 4, 2006). "And while one may normally imagine ornately framed oils of distinguished luminaries when thinking of the NPG, the Time covers offer a much closer to 'street level' survey of the prominent figures of any specific period." [via CSM]
posted by clgregor on Dec 14, 2005 - 7 comments

Fulton Street Trade Card Collection

Fulton Street Trade Card Collection at the Brooklyn Public Library consists of 245 late 19th and early 20th century illustrated trade cards, all emanating from businesses in Brooklyn's historic commercial thoroughfare. [via Gothamist]
posted by riffola on Dec 13, 2005 - 6 comments

Blogging through life, natural history illustration, and the past 65 million years.

Carl Buell, natural history illustrator, has started a blog. Interview with the man here.
posted by Sticherbeast on Dec 9, 2005 - 7 comments

Yes, it looks just like her

My Grandmother's Funeral - Quiet and melancholy comic - by cartoonist Nick Mullins.
posted by Peter H on Dec 9, 2005 - 25 comments

Art for Jazz

David Stone Martin (Coralized link) is not very well known, but you've most likely seen his work on featured on various jazz records. Be sure to view all three pages of some amazing album covers. (The original site is on Geocities, please be gentle)
posted by riffola on Dec 9, 2005 - 12 comments

Klik Kandy

Klik Kandy
posted by Mr Bluesky on Dec 8, 2005 - 10 comments

Autism Visible

Inside the Spectrum: a hauntingly beautiful and thought provoking little collection of photographs of autistic people by Chris Combs, a fiercely talented photographer in his early 20s who works at the Washington Post. Read Combs' project description here. For more on autism, see here.
posted by digaman on Dec 8, 2005 - 16 comments

The Art of William Schaff

William Schaff makes really good art... Perhaps you recognize his artwork from Songs:Ohia's Magnolia Electric Company release or maybe the beautiful artwork from Godspeed You Black Emperor's Lift Your Skinny Fists Like Antennas To Heaven either way his site has a huge collection of his scratchboards, paintings, collages, and mail art.
posted by mrs.pants on Dec 7, 2005 - 15 comments

Andrzej Munk: Wry Smiles, Suspicious Glances

Eroica. Film director Andrzej Munk’s tragic death at age thirty-nine might have formed the plot for one of his own darkly sardonic works: a Polish Jew and an active resistance worker during the war, he was returning home from shooting his film Passenger at the Auschwitz concentration camp in 1961 when an oncoming truck struck his car. He left behind only four feature films, but his influence was prodigious. As one of the key figures of the postwar “Polish School” of filmmaking, along with Wajda and Kawalerowicz, he helped to shape a vision that broke with the official social realist optimism of Eastern-bloc dogma and cast a skeptical eye on official notions of heroism, nationalism, and life in the Stalinist-occupied state. Mentor to Roman Polanski and Jerzy Skolimowski, his influence can be felt even in the films of a later generation of Polish filmmakers — directors like Zanussi and Kieslowski. More inside.
posted by matteo on Dec 7, 2005 - 7 comments

isometrics for everyone!

pixel art tool (flash demo)
posted by crunchland on Dec 7, 2005 - 9 comments

neet.

Tryptophan-5ht's kickass artwork. [via projects. NSFW: some artistic nudity]
posted by delmoi on Dec 7, 2005 - 25 comments

Laser-etched PowerBooks

Laser-etched PowerBooks.
posted by nthdegx on Dec 7, 2005 - 25 comments

3quarksdaily

3quarksdaily. Just another blog, sure, but a good one. 3quarksdaily is a filter blog much like our very own, but with only 15 users (and an editor). As they say on their about page "On this website, my guest authors and editors and I hope to present interesting items from around the web on a daily basis, in the areas of science, design, literature, current affairs, art, and anything else we deem inherently fascinating." The do an admirable job.
posted by panoptican on Dec 6, 2005 - 26 comments

First People

First People is a collection of artworks, vintage photographs, clipart, legends, essays, treaties, poems and more, relating to the first peoples of America and Canada (Turtle Island). [via]
posted by peacay on Dec 5, 2005 - 6 comments

(Un?)patriotic Dads with lawn chairs

Precision Lawn Chair Marching Dads
posted by dios on Dec 5, 2005 - 28 comments

9/11 in Comics

9/11 in comics, including the black-covered The Amazing Spider-Man #36 in its entirety.
posted by nthdegx on Dec 4, 2005 - 65 comments

It's A Small World After All

The winners of the 2005 Nikon Small World Competition are up (previous years going back to 1977 are also worth a look). Photomicrography produces some amazing imagery, giving us glimpses into both the inner workings of living things, and the intricate structure of nonliving things (just click "find all").
posted by Gator on Dec 4, 2005 - 4 comments

Experimentation in Film vs Digital

Alternative methods of photography When I first saw Scott Mutter [previously linked], I was hooked, and purchased a manual focus Nikon FG. I've resisted going digital (as have many) [partial nudity] until recently, when I purchased a DSLR - as I felt that nothing could come close to an SLR. While I love it, I find myself still fascinated by the older methods [main link], and the internet has allowed for easy distribution of unusual pinhole camera plans [annoying flash interface]. But is there a place for those of us holding on to the last fragments of traditional photography, or will alternative digital methods have to suffice?
posted by MysticMCJ on Dec 1, 2005 - 42 comments

Tryangle

Tryangle cannot be defined, but it's way fun. Use it to easily create angular art pieces, then share your creation with the teeming masses on the Tryangle Flickr pool.
posted by Cecily on Dec 1, 2005 - 13 comments

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