288 posts tagged with Artist.
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Modern artsists informed by their Native American heritage

Jason Garcia, who also goes by Okuu Pin (Tewa for Turtle Mountain, the name for Sandia Mountain) is a traditional clay artist from Santa Clara Pueblo in New Mexico, except his art isn't strictly traditional. His work is his effort to document the ever-changing cultural landscape of Santa Clara (8 minute interview and overview of his art), as seen in his 'Tewa Tales,' clay tiles painted as silver-age covers, depicting the Pueblo Revolt and the colonization of New Mexico. For more, see Jason Garcia's short bio video for North American Native Museum (Nordamerika Native Museum) in Zurich, Switzerland, for a past exhibition titled "Native Art Now." Vimeo user Dylan McLaughlin/Invisible Laboratory has 10 more short bio videos from other artists in the exhibit. [more inside]
posted by filthy light thief on Sep 14, 2016 - 4 comments

We don't serve string here

Artist Windy Chien spent a year learning a different nautical knot a day. See all (most?) of the knots here.
posted by Miko on Sep 13, 2016 - 31 comments

"I wanted to try something a little bit different."

Generating fantasy maps - source code
posted by a lungful of dragon on Aug 16, 2016 - 30 comments


ABC (potentially NSFW, due to CGI butts) by Alan Warburton (previously), as inspired by the work of Norwegian sculptor Gustav Vigeland (kinda previously)
posted by a lungful of dragon on Jul 19, 2016 - 5 comments

“I’m weirder now than I’ve ever been.”

Diagnosed with Multiple Sclerosis at age 46 in 1988, social worker, artist, dancer, marathoner and activist Patricia Lay-Dorsey has documented much of her journey. [more inside]
posted by Occula on May 31, 2016 - 1 comment

A rolling blob gathers Omoss

Albert Omoss is an artist who uses computers to explore bodies as rubbery, entangled forms (all likely NSFW) and to make ads and data visualizations. Among other tools, he uses Processing to make hypnotic animations.
posted by a lungful of dragon on May 29, 2016 - 13 comments

The symbolic value of rock is conflict-based:

Which Rock Star Will Historians of the Future Remember? by Chuck Klosterman [The New York Times] The most important musical form of the 20th century will be nearly forgotten one day. People will probably learn about the genre through one figure — so who might that be? [more inside]
posted by Fizz on May 23, 2016 - 173 comments


You know this guy? Yeah, him, with the art and the comics. Well, he successfully crowdfunded at least thirty cartoons, to be released weekly. Welcome (back) to the disquieting world of Joan Cornellà. (Warning: the various media contain nudity, violence, drug use and Jimbo the Jam.)
posted by BiggerJ on May 15, 2016 - 4 comments

Moon Knights and Demon Bears

A celebration of Bill Sienkiewicz - the unique comics artist most famous for his work on Moon Knight, The New Mutants, Stray Toasters and of course Elektra: Assassin.
posted by Artw on May 3, 2016 - 47 comments

questioning the 'illustrated tour of madness'

"During Wain's life, though, his fortunes reversed several times. Believed to be suffering from schizophrenia, Wain lived his final years in institutions. Eight of his cat drawings—which range from cuddly to psychedelic—came to be known as the 'Famous Series' and for years would be offered up as a the stages of a deteriorating mind, illustrated. But the truth is a bit more complicated." (Previously)
posted by joseph conrad is fully awesome on Apr 18, 2016 - 2 comments

Tony Conrad, 1940-2016-[infinite]

Rest in peace Tony Conrad, who passed early this morning at the age of 76 due to prostate cancer. He was a pioneering avant-garde musician, particularly known for his massive, minimalist drones. He collaborated with the likes of La Monte Young and Faust, and was a major inspiration for the Velvet Underground (he was briefly in a pre-VU band called the Primitives with John Cale and Lou Reed.) He was also an innovative video artist. More links within. [more inside]
posted by naju on Apr 9, 2016 - 25 comments

ars gratia artis?

Richard Prince's new "portraits" are a reminder that someone else can sell your Instagram pictures for $100,000. When does appropriation go too far? Richard Prince sucks, but his Instagram paintings [prints] are genius trolling. Why the latest copyright lawsuit matters, from experts. [more inside]
posted by the man of twists and turns on Feb 23, 2016 - 125 comments

Hard Truths

The artist Thornton Dial has died
posted by bongo_x on Jan 25, 2016 - 8 comments

Inside Outsider Art

This weekend, New York City hosted the 24th Annual Outsider Art Fair. Director Rebecca Hoffman shares some highlights, the New York Times provides an overview, and Bloomberg Business considers whether Outsider Art has gone mainstream. Meanwhile, a Christie's Ousider Art auction the same weekend brought in over 1.5 million dollars. [h/t]
posted by Room 641-A on Jan 24, 2016 - 10 comments

Uncanny Valley of the dolls

Russian artist makes eerily realistic dolls. [more inside]
posted by sively on Jan 21, 2016 - 21 comments

"We all deserve to be happy, healthy, and respected."

Sometimes, music is the best medicine.” Frank Waln is a 26-year-old Hip-Hop artist; a Sicangu Lakota person who grew up on the Rosebud Reservation, taught himself to play piano as a child, and mixes his own music in his basement studio. [more inside]
posted by one teak forest on Jan 17, 2016 - 3 comments

“…if you use a razor blade and glue; you can change the whole world.”

The Art of Punk (previously) is a documentary series from MOCAtv, the L.A. Museum of Contemporary Arts’ YoutTube channel. The series looks at the visual language of the punk rock movement by focussing on three legendary punk rock bands and the seminal artists behind their iconic logos. [more inside]
posted by Room 641-A on Dec 1, 2015 - 4 comments

Stephanie Pui-Mun Law - watercolor artist

Stephanie is a painter and illustrator of fantastical art or as she puts it - painted reality.
posted by ladyriffraff on Nov 21, 2015 - 11 comments

Paul Laffoley (b. August 14, 1935 - d. November 16, 2015)

From his obituary: "The visionary artist and luminary, Paul Laffoley, has died today after a long battle with congestive heart failure. He had an extraordinary grasp of multiple fields of knowledge compulsively pursing interests that often lead him into uncharted territory. His complex theoretical constructs were uniquely presented in highly detailed mandala-like canvases largely scaled to Fibonacci's golden ratio." Some of his better known works are available on his website. HuffPo offers a surprisingly good survey of his more recent works. Previously. Apologies for the workmanlike quality of this FPP - I am genuinely upset at the news of Mr. Laffoley's passing.
posted by doctor tough love on Nov 17, 2015 - 10 comments

The Art of Richard Thompson

(slvimeo) Richard Thompson is renowned among cartoonists as the "artist's" cartoonist. Little known to all but those close to him is the extent of his extraordinary art, a gift so rare that it compelled "Calvin and Hobbes" creator, Bill Watterson, to break an almost 20 year silence and declare, "Now I have a reason to read comics again". Cul de Sac, his comic strip, from the beginning.
posted by ladyriffraff on Oct 11, 2015 - 25 comments

The (mostly) limbless magician, penman, musician of the 18th Century

Matthias Buchinger, sometimes called Matthew Buckinger, described himself as "the wonderful Little Man of but 29 inches high, born without Hands, Feet, or Thighs." Despite being born (in Germany in 1674) with limbs "more resembling fins of a fish than arms of a man," he was renowned for his works as a calligrapher and micrographer (remarked for details illustrated in psalms written in characters of different sizes), builder of whimsey bottles (the oldest known "mining bottle"), and called the most extraordinary conjurer of all time. People may have initially gathered to see a tragedy, but instead were presented with an astounding range of impressive skills. [more inside]
posted by filthy light thief on Oct 8, 2015 - 6 comments

Julie Dillon - artist

Julie Dillion is an award winning science fiction and fantasy artist in a field that rarely nominates women. One of the themes of her work is diversity. And yes, she's up for the Best Professional Artist Hugo again this year.
posted by ladyriffraff on Aug 19, 2015 - 13 comments

I can give you a tour. I think you look lovely tonight. I'm a gift.

Sophia Foster-Dimino is an illustrator and cartoonist.
Foster-Dimino’s ability to articulate very specific, very familiar, rarely articulated emotional sensations is uncanny here. (...) “Have you noticed that loving someone is like pouring water into a well,” asks the frenemy. “You don’t pour water into a well you get water out of a well,” protests the protagonist, now crying. “Your lover is a deep dark delicious well & you’re nothing but a bucket,” her tormenter responds without missing a beat. “Not even a cool bucket,” she continues, “a lackluster ordinary bucket—that feels so heavy but holds so little.” To be blunt, fuuuuuuuck.
[more inside] posted by glass origami robot on Aug 7, 2015 - 13 comments

“There was art before him and art after him and they were not the same.”

Caravaggio [Part 1] [Part 2] [Part 3] [Part 4] [Part 5] [Part 6] [Part 7] Art critic Robert Hughes reflects on the work of troubled Italian artist Caravaggio.
posted by Fizz on Aug 1, 2015 - 7 comments

Antelope? More like antelnope.

Kate Clark is an artist who uses clay to sculpt human faces for taxidermied animals. You can easily browse the gallery by starting here and using the arrow navigation in the top right.
posted by phunniemee on Jul 27, 2015 - 20 comments

"My god, are they going to leave me here to die?"

The late Roger Ebert writes about a piece conceptual artist Chris Burden performed at the Museum of Contemporary Art in 1975. Chris Burden previously on Metafilter.
posted by Juliet Banana on May 11, 2015 - 23 comments

Life Lines

For an artist with amnesia, the world takes place through her pencil.
posted by ellieBOA on Apr 20, 2015 - 1 comment

Director, Special Projects for the State of Eternity

The one work of art by James Hampton was the The Throne of the Third Heaven of the Nations' Millennium General Assembly. He built it when not working as a janitor for the General Services Administration. What does it mean? Good question. Everything Hampton ever wrote about it is in a single manuscript, St James: The Book of the 7 Dispensation... and it is in code.
posted by dfm500 on Apr 18, 2015 - 11 comments

Nobody is free until everybody is free.

Unsung Heroines provides bite-sized biographies of Black women who changed the world, and is a great way to learn history you were deliberately not taught in school. Women profiled include Fannie Lou Hamer, the civil rights hero who first said "I’m sick and tired of being sick and tired;" Mary Church Terrell, an early advocate for civil rights and the suffrage movement; Melba Roy Mouton, a NASA mathmatician; as well as: [more inside]
posted by Juliet Banana on Apr 9, 2015 - 6 comments

“Every person is a half-opened door leading to a room for everyone.”

Tomas Transtromer, Nobel-Winning Poet, Dies at 83 [New York Times] Previously.
posted by Fizz on Mar 29, 2015 - 13 comments

Our Complicity With Excess

"[In] the face of a culture that would deny them, it becomes necessary for an artist of color in the west to defiantly announce to the world: I am a fact." In April 2014, at the first ever Yale Asian Alumni Reunion, Vijay Iyer delivered a powerful speech "on two intertwined issues: the role of Asian Americans as upwardly mobile minorities and the role of the artist as a potential transgressor within elite institutions."
posted by Errant on Mar 23, 2015 - 3 comments

"Art to me means life" - Wanda Gág

Wanda Gág (1893–1946), best known for her book Millions of Cats - one of the only picture books to ever win a Newbery Honor award and the book that pioneered the two-page spread - wrote and illustrated her stories, the stories of others, and her own diary with what she called a "full-flavored, conversational style, and with a sly peasant humor." [more inside]
posted by sockermom on Mar 17, 2015 - 14 comments

"Lights out!"

Comics artist Brett Ewins, co-creator of Deadline, artist for Skreemer and Johnny Nemo, and frequent 2000AD contributor (cover gallery), has passed away passed away age 59.
posted by Artw on Feb 17, 2015 - 18 comments

The Clock

Artist Gislain Benoit builds an incredible hand soldered clock. Ever curious what encompasses a digital watch? Now you can.
posted by KernalM on Feb 1, 2015 - 18 comments

Mother nature can be great but I prefer to take control of my appearance

If you saw her catwalking like no one was watching, you'd see she was a model. But if you've seen the Channel 4 advert/short, you have seen Viktoria Modesta as a Prototype. [more inside]
posted by filthy light thief on Dec 15, 2014 - 23 comments

A pound of flesh for 50p

Artist Alex Chinneck has constructed a full-sized wax building which is slowly being melted from the top down. For the last twelve months the artist has collaborated with chemists, wax manufacturers and engineers to develop visually convincing wax bricks that transform in the most sculpturally effective way. The installation is part of the 2014 Merge Festival.
posted by showbiz_liz on Nov 15, 2014 - 19 comments

"The straight line belongs to men, the curved one to God."

Antonio Gaudi [YouTube] a 1984 Japanese documentary film by Hiroshi Teshigahara about the works of Antoni Gaudi. In the film the director visits the buildings including houses in Barcelona and the Sagrada Família. [more inside]
posted by Fizz on Oct 22, 2014 - 10 comments

"...the expansion and contraction of this particular timespace..."

The Last Saturday by Chris Ware [The Guardian]
" A brand new graphic novella by the award-winning cartoonist Chris Ware, tracing the lives of six individuals from Sandy Port, Michigan, published in weekly episodes on this page."
The page always shows the latest instalment and a new part appears every Friday. Use the arrows beneath the strip to read previous episodes.
posted by Fizz on Oct 10, 2014 - 11 comments

Water color and computer concept illustrations by Tucker Cullinan

Tucker Cullinan is a concept artist whose styles span vivid organic/sci-fi scenes in water colors and lost worlds from the imaginary past, to colder, sharp-edged futuristic worlds, and computer illustrations of imaginary prototypes. More on his blog and his portfolio site, plus two interviews.
posted by filthy light thief on Oct 3, 2014 - 2 comments

How The Simpsons Co-Creator Sam Simon Is Facing His Own Tragedy

Diagnosed with terminal cancer two years ago, and given only months to live, Sam Simon is still alive and still racing to spend the fortune he made as co-creator of The Simpsons on causes he loves, whether he is rescuing grizzly bears (and chinchillas and elephants) or funding vegan food banks. Sam Simon and philanthropy previously on Metafilter
posted by ellieBOA on Sep 29, 2014 - 7 comments

Madonna as serious Classical Hollywood cinephile

The exhaustively researched Hollywood history podcast You Must Remember This (Previously) presents a two part episode focusing on Madonna's use of classic Hollywood imagery and references as a form of conceptual art and her early attempts to trade pop idol success for movie stardom within the context of two high-profile relationships with Sean Penn and Warren Beatty. Episode One. Episode Two. Meanwhile, Todd In The Shadows creates video reviews for every movie Madonna was ever in. So far he's done Desperately Seeking Susan, Shanghai Surprise, A Certain Sacrifice, and Who's That Girl.
posted by The Whelk on Sep 26, 2014 - 9 comments

"I don’t want to be a 40-year-old rapper."

André 3000 Is Moving On in Film, Music and Life [New York Times]
posted by Fizz on Aug 28, 2014 - 37 comments

i think my photos feel more like paintings to me

Hobbes Ginsberg is a 20-year-old photographer from Los Angeles who takes gorgeous, color saturated, studio composed photographs of herself and others, most often her girlfriend Chloe (NSFW). Buy her photozine, see photos from an exhibition, or read her text blog. [more inside]
posted by Juliet Banana on Jul 31, 2014 - 12 comments

"I draw with paper instead of on it"

Yulia Brodskaya is a Russian artist/illustrator now living in England whose quilled paper pieces are increasingly in demand. Her website is rich with her work - jump right into the illustration or art sectons - or browse the news section to see a roughly reverse chronological listing. Design Taxi has collected a group of images highlighting her quilled typography. [more inside]
posted by julen on Jul 4, 2014 - 7 comments

"the realities of cabbage"

Artist Walks A Cabbage In Public To Question How Society Value Things In a project that started since year 2000, Chinese artist Han Bing has documented a series of photographs that see him walking a cabbage on a leash in public.
posted by Fizz on Jun 24, 2014 - 34 comments

Also Monster Haikus

Childhood - a hand-bound book of Japanese styled illustrations paying homage to nostalgic activities and toys. From artist Chet Phillips.
posted by Lou Stuells on Jun 17, 2014 - 6 comments

"I think the mainstream are the outsiders and I'm the way it should be."

Billy Childish is known as a poet, painter, and musician who is routinely reduced to doing the same thing over and over again. A recent interview in The Guardian demonstrates how much he continues to stay the course, going so far to call him a "monomaniac". [more inside]
posted by kendrak on May 22, 2014 - 12 comments

Burning down the debts: protesting the high cost of education in Chile

Francisco Tapia, aka "Papas Fritas" (French Fries), is an artist and activist whose recent work has drawn international attention. It might not look like much, but it is US$500 million of ashes, the burnt remains of "debt papers" for student of the now defunct Universidad Del Mar, a private institution in Chile that was stripped of its legal standing in 2012. While this might sound like a singular bold move to make people pay attention to the cost of education in Chile, it's just one of many acts in support of efforts to reclaim a very expensive private education options in Chile, with student protests going back to 2006. Chile's president Michelle Bachelet proposed a reform bill on Monday, May 19th, but it doesn't go as far as some protesters would like.
posted by filthy light thief on May 21, 2014 - 8 comments

fiction in the form of art gallery plaques

"Card Tricks by James Hannaham recommended by Jennifer Egan"
"By invoking the existence of artworks involving the gallery space, the people inside it, and the larger world (quite literally), Hannaham performs an ingenious reversal: the subject illuminated by the plaques ends up being us, the reader-viewers. And our experience of reading and viewing them—in what order we choose, in what state we’re in that day or night, in what company, in what mood, in what weather, is the narrative."
posted by davidstandaford on May 5, 2014 - 3 comments

Hold me tight

Valley of Dolls
Eleven years ago, Ayano Tsukimi returned to her home in Nagoro. Confronted with constant departures, she has populated the village with dolls, each representing a former villager. Around 350 of the giant dolls now reside in and around Nagoro, replacing those that died or abandoned the village years ago.

In a recent documentary titled The Valley Of Dolls, Fritz Schumann explores Tsukimi's world, highlighting the time and artistry that goes into making the figures, and explaining her motivations. In it we're shown around a local school, once filled with children and teachers, that now houses dozens of dolls, sitting statically, waiting for class to begin.

posted by infini on May 3, 2014 - 13 comments

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