119 posts tagged with Atlantic.
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Power of tower

Building human towers in Spain - Every year in Spain, a Catalan tradition of building Castells—human towers reaching up to 10 stories—takes place. [more inside]
posted by a lungful of dragon on Oct 4, 2016 - 22 comments

Some really endless ocean ahead now..,

Crossing the Atlantic in a Beechcraft 76. "In 2013 the flight school I worked at in Sweden decided to sell their two old Beech 76's in favor of a new DA42. The buyer was in San Diego, Cali. So me and three friends had the once-in-a-lifetime chance to fly them across the Atlantic and through the US. These are some of the pictures I took on that trip."
posted by blue_beetle on Aug 6, 2016 - 30 comments

Millennial Reality

What does the life of an average 29 year old American look like? (SLAtl)
posted by R.F.Simpson on Apr 20, 2016 - 53 comments

Inside the Artificial Universe That Creates Itself

A team of programmers has built a self-generating cosmos, and even they don’t know what’s hiding in its vast reaches. Through the use of procedural generation, No Man’s Sky ensures that each planet will be a surprise, even to the programmers. Every creature, AI-guided alien spacecraft, or landscape is a pseudo-random product of the computer program itself. The universe is essentially as unknown to the people who made it as it is to the people who play in it—and ultimately, it is destined to remain that way. As previously mentioned here.
posted by slackdog on Feb 18, 2016 - 106 comments

Your Home Is Filled With Bugs

Census Finds Lots of Bugs in 50 US Homes Aside from pets, family members, or roommates, many of us often go weeks without seeing another living thing in our homes. But appearances can be deceiving. We are, in fact, surrounded by arthropods—insects, spiders, centipedes, and other animals with hard external skeletons and jointed legs. They are the most successful animals on the planet, and the walls that shield our homes to the elements are no barriers to them. In the first systematic census of its kind, a team of entomologists combed through 50 American houses for every arthropod they could find, and discovered a startling amount of diversity. [more inside]
posted by narancia on Jan 19, 2016 - 80 comments


"In an age when the line between childhood and adulthood is blurrier than ever, what is it that makes people grown up?" [more inside]
posted by flex on Jan 6, 2016 - 216 comments

The underlying message of the Neighborhood

"I can still hear him signing off his show similar to the way he concluded his letter to Amy Melder: “You’ve made this day a special day by just your being you. There is no person in the whole world like you, and I like you just the way you are.” Some have suggested that this message sought to instill children with a sense of self-importance, but to believe that is to fundamentally misunderstand Fred Rogers. At the core of Rogers’ mission was the paradoxical Christian belief that the way to gain one’s life is to give it away." (SL Atlantic)
posted by roomthreeseventeen on Nov 23, 2015 - 36 comments

“Lets just get this out of the way: no, it does not taste like chicken.”

The Burning Man of Birding: Inside Iceland's Puffin Festival by Brian Kevin [Audubon.org] For decades Icelanders have celebrated the Atlantic Puffin even while they've served it up on plates. But some traditions can't last forever.
These days, though, the only place to reliably find smoked puffin at Thjodhatid is in the concession tent, where, alongside cheeseburgers and chicken fingers, it’s sold for 1,500 krona, or about $12, per bird. That’s three times what it cost 20 years ago, making one little puffin an expensive snack; it’d take three birds to make a modest meal. So it isn’t a popular menu item—the concession tent has stocked just 600 birds for a three-day fest that regularly draws 16,000 people. Still, the puffin has its devotees.
posted by Fizz on Nov 11, 2015 - 31 comments

How Friendships Change in Adulthood

The voluntary nature of friendship makes it subject to life’s whims in a way more formal relationships aren’t. In adulthood, as people grow up and go away, friendships are the relationships most likely to take a hit. You’re stuck with your family, and you’ll prioritize your spouse. But where once you could run over to Jonny’s house at a moment’s notice and see if he could come out to play, now you have to ask Jonny if he has a couple hours to get a drink in two weeks. [more inside]
posted by ellieBOA on Oct 26, 2015 - 61 comments

Hit Charade

"The biggest pop star in America today is a man named Karl Martin Sandberg. The lead singer of an obscure ’80s glam-metal band, Sandberg grew up in a remote suburb of Stockholm and is now 44. Sandberg is the George Lucas, the LeBron James, the Serena Williams of American pop. He is responsible for more hits than Phil Spector, Michael Jackson, or the Beatles." [more inside]
posted by p3on on Sep 18, 2015 - 154 comments

They're also not the nicest countries in the world to visit

Not the easiest countries in the world to visit.
posted by jacquilynne on Sep 4, 2015 - 32 comments

Coming from bad circumstances will kill you, even if you escape them.

Advantaged people with high levels of self-control and resilience age slower. Disadvantaged people with high levels of self-control and resilience age faster.
posted by You Can't Tip a Buick on Jul 18, 2015 - 35 comments

The Grass Ceiling

The Grass Ceiling: How to Conquer Inequality in Women's Soccer [Atlantic link] An attorney who helped players file a gender-discrimination lawsuit over artificial turf in the World Cup proposes a way forward for the sport. [more inside]
posted by hippybear on Jul 5, 2015 - 30 comments

Letter to My Son

Letter to My Son, by Ta-Nehisi Coates, July 4, 2015: "I came to understand that my country was a galaxy, and this galaxy stretched from the pandemonium of West Baltimore to the happy hunting grounds of Mr. Belvedere. I obsessed over the distance between that other sector of space and my own. I knew that my portion of the American galaxy, where bodies were enslaved by a tenacious gravity, was black and that the other, liberated portion was not... And I felt in this a cosmic injustice, a profound cruelty, which infused an abiding, irrepressible desire to unshackle my body and achieve the velocity of escape."
posted by roomthreeseventeen on Jul 5, 2015 - 31 comments

The Atlantic Slave Trade in Two Minutes

Interactive animation of the Atlantic slave trade. Pause and click on individuals ships for detailed data (not available for all ships).
posted by laptolain on Jul 2, 2015 - 25 comments

Hipster New York Health Advice

Living Simply With A Flip Phone [more inside]
posted by aloiv2 on Jun 18, 2015 - 94 comments

Exploring Colorblindness

More than 15 million people in the U.S. and over 300 million worldwide don’t see normal colors. As one of those 300 million, Atlantic writer Oliver Morrison engages with different perspectives around colorblindness. Some are held by disability-rights activists who advocate for awareness as well as social approaches to mitigate the effects, others are those of scientists who have discovered medical treatments. Morrison also tries out a wearable solution offered by a US company. [more inside]
posted by prewar lemonade on May 15, 2015 - 22 comments

Paging Tom Smothers

The Secret Life of Yo-Yos. In which high-end titanium models cost upwards of $500, and ball-bearing trans-axels allow yo-yos to "sleep" for over 30 minutes. Also, Tom Smothers has still got it.
posted by artsandsci on Apr 10, 2015 - 18 comments

Jumpin' Jehosaphat

Why Frogs Have Taken Over Passover: a comprehensive and captivating survey of frogs in legend and literature, just in time for everybody's plague-ridden holiday remembrance. [via mefi projects]
posted by Johnny Wallflower on Apr 2, 2015 - 8 comments

"Uncertainty itself can lead to a lot of distress for humans"

So says Dan Grupe in this article about Emily 'Dear Prudence' Yoffe, anxiety and the stress of not knowing.
posted by averysmallcat on Mar 23, 2015 - 4 comments

The irrationality of Alcoholics Anonymous

Its faith-based 12-step program dominates treatment in the United States. But researchers have debunked central tenets of AA doctrine and found dozens of other treatments more effective.
Gabrielle Glaser explores alcohol-use disorder treatment of many types in a lengthy (quite lengthy) article for The Atlantic. [more inside]
posted by hippybear on Mar 18, 2015 - 140 comments

We are the world...

It's been a long winter, everyone's a little loopy, and that's probably as good a reason as any for the Internet to have delved into the 30th anniversary of "We Are the World" a bit more (and more entertainingly) than strictly necessary: [more inside]
posted by Stacey on Mar 10, 2015 - 32 comments

From Grad School to The Atlantic: Public Discourse & Comment Sections

Anyone who writes articles on the web knows the maxim: "Don’t read the comments." Fortunately for Yoni Appelbaum, a recent Ph.D. in history from Brandeis University, the well-known writer Ta-Nehisi Coates routinely ignores that rule.
How a history Ph.D. who was on the tenure-track market ended up in with a pretty good gig in journalism, primarily because of the quality of his comments.
posted by Toekneesan on Feb 27, 2015 - 8 comments

Spider-Man in Love

"I knew, from a very early age, that there was love in my house, imperfect love, love that was built, decided upon, as opposed to magicked into existence. That was how Peter loved Mary Jane." In The Atlantic, Ta-Nehisi Coates reflects on love and marriage as portrayed between Peter "Spider-Man" Parker and Mary Jane Watson. [more inside]
posted by nicebookrack on Jan 27, 2015 - 42 comments

Our presence together ... is evidence that we all have screwed up.

In the Basement of the Ivory Tower. A 2008 article about a place where the dream of sending every American to college has an ugly encounter with reality.
posted by kaibutsu on Jan 21, 2015 - 51 comments

A Constant Drizzle of Disappointment

The Real Roots of Midlife Crisis In The Atlantic, Jonathan Rauch writes about why the forties are such a hard age for so many people.
Long ago, when I was 30 and he was 66, the late Donald Richie told me: “Midlife crisis begins sometime in your 40s, when you look at your life and think, Is this all? And it ends about 10 years later, when you look at your life again and think, Actually, this is pretty good.
(Previously on Metafilter: another thoughtful essay by Rauch.)
posted by yankeefog on Jan 5, 2015 - 165 comments

I am getting my information from NASA

Susan Miller writes 40,000 words a month at Astrologyzone.com, perhaps the world's most popular horoscope website. She also writes for Elle, TIME, the Washington Post and various stars and CEOs. Recent delays have led to fan Twitter storms discussed in the Atlantic (Dude, Where's My Horoscope?), Jezebel (Susan Miller's Illness has Astrology Fans Losing Their Goddamn Minds), the NY Post (Groupies of famed astrologer Susan Miller can’t cope without her), the latest episode of the podcastTL;DR , and, of course, there's reddit.
posted by bq on Dec 23, 2014 - 49 comments

The Urban Oil Fields of Los Angeles.

The Urban Oil Fields of Los Angeles.
posted by Combustible Edison Lighthouse on Sep 1, 2014 - 29 comments

Fashion Solutions for Hiding from SkyNet

In Anti-Surveillance Camouflage for Your Face, technology reporter Robinson Meyer details an experiment in which he tried actually going about his day to day life in downtown Washington DC while wearing CV Dazzle, (previously on MeFi) makeup and hairstyles to confuse facial recognition software. The technique is inspired by the old naval technique of dazzle camouflage, which sought not to conceal a ship, but to confuse viewers as to its size and heading. Similarly, CV Dazzle aims to confuse software by making your face look less like a face and more like a confusing collection of shapes. This proves to have unanticipated effects on how Robinson is perceived by humans as well, leading to insights about how our appearance signals our privilege and place in the social hierarchy, and how that can overlap or conflict with the digital wakes we leave.
posted by Naberius on Jul 24, 2014 - 78 comments

How can you do justice to all? You can't.

While interviewing Indra K. Nooyi, the CEO of PepsiCo, at the Aspen Ideas Festival Monday, David Bradley, who owns The Atlantic, asked two questions that elicited as frank a discussion of work-life balance as I've seen from a U.S. CEO. Pepsi CEO's Mother Had A Brutally Honest Reaction To Her Daughter’s New Job. (Previously)
posted by naju on Jul 2, 2014 - 198 comments

How to write 225 words per minute

How to write 225 words per minute. With a pen. Dennis Hollier, in the Atlantic, writes about Gregg shorthand, a piece of analog data-compression technology now largely forgotten and probably forever unequalled.
posted by escabeche on Jun 25, 2014 - 54 comments

The NYPL's Open Maps Project adds 20,000 High Res Maps

The New York Public Library has released more than 20,000 high resolution cartographic works (maps!) for free, to view and download. "We believe these maps have no known US copyright restrictions." All can be viewed through the New York Public Library’s Digital Collections page and downloaded through their Map Warper. (Via) [more inside]
posted by zarq on Mar 31, 2014 - 11 comments

turtle voyage

Sea Turtles' "Lost Years" Transatlantic Journey Mapped for First Time "Researchers' stick-to-it-iveness, along with advice from a manicurist lead to radio tags that tracked baby loggerheads across the Atlantic (full paper) without hindering them"
posted by dhruva on Mar 7, 2014 - 8 comments

What is the genealogy of the AMA?

The Atlantic attempts to explain how Reddit's Ask Me Anything became a "mainstream delight." [Previously]. [Even more previously]. [Even more previously than that]. [more inside]
posted by MoonOrb on Jan 7, 2014 - 36 comments

1 weird old trick that will make you 100s of $millions

Jesse Willms, the Dark Lord of the Internet. How one of the most notorious alleged hustlers in the history of e-commerce made a fortune on the Web.
posted by gottabefunky on Jan 2, 2014 - 54 comments

The Politics Of The Next Dimension: Do Ghosts Have Civil Rights?

The Awl presents the article that would've accompanied that Atlantic Monthly cover from Ghostbusters.
posted by Pope Guilty on Dec 23, 2013 - 21 comments

2013: The Year 'the Stream' Crested

"Information is increasingly being distributed and presented in real-time streams instead of dedicated Web pages. The shift is palpable, even if it is only in its early stages," Erick Schonfeld wrote. "Web companies large and small are embracing this stream. It is not just Twitter. It is Facebook and Friendfeed and AOL and Digg and Tweetdeck and Seesmic Desktop and Techmeme and Tweetmeme and Ustream and Qik and Kyte and blogs and Google Reader. The stream is winding its way throughout the Web and organizing it by nowness."
[more inside] posted by Elementary Penguin on Dec 19, 2013 - 30 comments

At least three disturbing lessons about love.

So take the film on its own titular terms. What does Love Actually tell us about love, actually? Well, I think it tells us a number of things, most of them wrong and a few of them appalling. Now, anyone who goes to the cineplex with any regularity knows that the last decade has seen more than its share of bad romantic comedies. But Love Actually is exceptional in that it is not merely, like so many other entries in the genre, unromantic. Rather, it is emphatically, almost shockingly, anti-romantic. Love Actually Is the Least Romantic Film of All Time
posted by davidjmcgee on Dec 7, 2013 - 105 comments

But do you eat it standing up or sitting down?

Apparently we've been eating apples incorrectly. If each of us eats an apple a day, and we are all wasting 30 percent of our apples at $1.30 per pound, that's about $42 wasted per person per year—which is $13.2 billion annually, thrown in the trash or fed to pigs.
Taking a cue from a video entitled "How to eat an apple like a Boss", the Atlantic encourages us to be less wasteful.
posted by arcticseal on Nov 15, 2013 - 162 comments

What worked well 224 years ago is no longer the best we can do.

According to researchers who analyzed all 729 constitutions adopted between 1946 and 2006, the U.S. Constitution is rarely used as a model. What's more, "the American example is being rejected to an even greater extent by America's allies than by the global community at large"...

"There are about 30 countries, mostly in Latin America, that have adopted American-style systems. All of them, without exception, have succumbed to...constitutional crisis[es]—your full range of political violence, revolution, coup, and worse. But well short of war, you can end up in a state of "crisis governance," he writes. "President and house may merely indulge a taste for endless backbiting, mutual recrimination, and partisan deadlock. Worse yet, the contending powers may use the constitutional tools at their disposal to make life miserable for each other: The house will harass the executive, and the president will engage in unilateral action whenever he can get away with it." [Juan Linz] wrote that almost a decade and a half ago, long before anyone had heard of Barack Obama, let alone the Tea Party.
The Atlantic's Alex Seitz-Wald makes a case against the U.S. Constitution: The U.S. Needs a New Constitution—Here's How to Write It.
posted by zardoz on Nov 5, 2013 - 78 comments

But it is hard for Ben to take the long view.

I Married A Jew. Published January 1, 1939 in the Atlantic.
posted by prefpara on Oct 29, 2013 - 86 comments

This Is the Average Man's Body

This Is the Average Man's Body
posted by anazgnos on Oct 14, 2013 - 138 comments

Making school better for boys.

As the United States moves toward a knowledge-based economy, school achievement has become the cornerstone of lifelong success. Women are adapting; men are not. Yet the education establishment and federal government are, with some notable exceptions, looking the other way.
posted by MoonOrb on Sep 13, 2013 - 128 comments

Google Maps, Now Customized

For years, Google Maps has been the map of our world in a historically unprecedented way. The new Google Maps (announcement) will eschew the uniformity of the old Maps and instead customize the map experience based on a user's behavior. Some are concerned how this artificial narrowing will affect the way we experience places and relate to our urban spaces. Others believe the customization makes the new maps more honest. Most, however, will probably just want to comment on the huge overhaul to the interface.
posted by Defenestrator on May 29, 2013 - 104 comments

Return Of The Nazi Weather Robot

What won the war? The weather helped. For while the Allies had access to all the Atlantic meteorology, the Axis couldn't easily predict what systems were rolling in from the West - and with the Battle of the Atlantic the one thing that Churchill said kept him awake at night, knowing which way the wind blew certainly needed a weatherman. Or Britain would never be starved into submission. The Weather War was complex and engaging, [more inside]
posted by Devonian on May 17, 2013 - 16 comments

Hello, Lanie the organic gardener

The Atlantic reports on the 2008 removal/"archiving" of the original three American Girl dolls, dolls whose arrival on the market in 1986 represented a "sensibility about teaching girls to understand thorny historical controversies and build political consciousness." [more inside]
posted by roomthreeseventeen on Apr 26, 2013 - 34 comments

I have a crazy friend who says we dont need zipcodes...is he CRAZY?

On July 1, 1963, The US Post Office introduced the five-digit ZIP Code with a series of PSAs broadcast on national TV. The Atlantic looks at a new report [PDF] that details the history of the now $9.5 billion a year product and its current state of affairs.
posted by Potomac Avenue on Apr 25, 2013 - 64 comments

Consider The Lobster Claw

Why Claw Machines Filled With Live Lobsters Delight and Disturb Us
posted by Charlemagne In Sweatpants on Mar 25, 2013 - 52 comments

The Moose Cleanse

Remember, it's not about "not eating" human food. It's about eating more pondweed.
posted by Tesseractive on Feb 8, 2013 - 33 comments

Are you awake?

What does it mean to be conscious? The point of view of anesthesiology.
posted by Obscure Reference on Jan 5, 2013 - 42 comments

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