1002 posts tagged with Blog.
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A Chicago Sojourn

A journey through the architecture and urban landscape of Chicago – from industrial zones to Mid-Century suburbs and all points between. [more inside]
posted by davejh on Oct 12, 2015 - 4 comments

We'll chase them like rats across the tundra

Here's Hunter S. Thompson in the 80s, a post on Rants, Ravings, Gibberish & Jabs. And here's an encode of a rare VHS video of Dr. Thompson at this time in his life, "The Crazy Never Die." (31m, NSFW for a little full nudity.) And here's video of a commercial for Dr. Thompson writing for the San Francisco Examiner.
posted by JHarris on Sep 16, 2015 - 15 comments

It’s disturbia out there.

The First-Person Industrial Complex: The Internet prizes the harrowing personal essay. But sometimes telling your story comes with a price. (Slate)
posted by roomthreeseventeen on Sep 14, 2015 - 17 comments

When did we all become 'curators'?

"how did curating, a highly specialized line of museum work involving the care, accessioning, and exhibition of artworks, come to mean, as cultural policy scholar Amanda Coles puts it, “just picking stuff?”" - Miya Tokumitsu [more inside]
posted by the man of twists and turns on Aug 27, 2015 - 99 comments

ICU Nurse, Blogger

An ICU nurse with a way for words details her shift reports elise the great is a Something Awful poster (in the hidden Goon Doctor section) who has a long history of frank and well-written posts detailing her shifts at work in a busy ICU. After a long period of trying to convince her to write a book, and a subforum experiment involving diary-style entries, she has agreed to a blog. [more inside]
posted by the uncomplicated soups of my childhood on Aug 3, 2015 - 111 comments

United Nations of Food

My mission: to eat (reasonably) authentic cuisine from every country in the world (160 countries), without leaving New York City.
posted by roomthreeseventeen on Aug 3, 2015 - 32 comments

Rosin Cerate

Rosin Cerate is an "intensely researched blog" bringing you all kinds of interesting and odd knowledge about biology and creatures and how certain esoteric metals give you garlic breath. [via mefi projects] [more inside]
posted by moonmilk on Jul 17, 2015 - 5 comments

No Comment

Technology blog The Verge has decided to turn off their comment system "for a bit". [more inside]
posted by fairmettle on Jul 8, 2015 - 89 comments

Unmaking Things

Unmaking Things: A Design History Studio is a creative space for exploring innovative approaches to the study of design and objects. The site is founded, edited, and run by students on the Royal College of Art / Victoria and Albert Museum History of Design MA course and covers a diverse range of topics – from product design to critical theory; from the history of decorative arts to analysis of space. The student editors and site design change annually. New articles are posted every Monday and Thursday.
posted by jedicus on Jun 10, 2015 - 1 comment

#maybe she's born with it #maybe it's bear blood

Historie of Beafts combs through Medieval bestiaries to bring you the finest in olde-tyme animal facts. [more inside]
posted by showbiz_liz on Jun 3, 2015 - 32 comments

the point is that he doesn’t want me to buy towels.

“Hey, I need you to hold the giraffe so I can reach the crystal chandelier.” [more inside]
posted by RolandOfEld on Apr 23, 2015 - 21 comments

Write on.

This is a blog about all things pencil. Sometimes pens. Paper, too.
posted by phunniemee on Apr 22, 2015 - 21 comments

Wine for Normal People

Wine for Normal People is a podcast and blog where wine lover and expert Elizabeth Schneider discusses geeks out about all things wine. Fun highlights include wine scoring systems and why we should revolt against them, the difference between cheap plonk and well made wine, wine reviews and BS, and offensive ways wines are marketed to women, all peppered with industry insider knowledge from her years working for a big, hulking winery.
posted by gueneverey on Mar 20, 2015 - 50 comments

"Once you are Real you can't become unreal again. It lasts for always."

The Velveteen Rabbit read by Meryl Streep (24 min. 39 secs.); a shorter, more official source of the video is at Meryl Streep Info blog, with promotional material. Online edition of the 1922 book by Margery Williams, complete with original illustrations by William Nicholson, at the Digital Library at UPenn. [more inside]
posted by joseph conrad is fully awesome on Mar 4, 2015 - 8 comments

Suck a lemon, ASQ.

One mom's take on the Ages & Stages Questionnaire.
posted by Ruki on Feb 25, 2015 - 23 comments

Steve, Don't Eat it!

The Sneeze column, Steve, Don't Eat It! Although most of this material was written in the early 2000's, I'm surprised when I talk about it and people look at me like I'm crazy. The Sneeze was an ambitious and funny blog full of insights about life, parenting, humor and also had solid reporting on gross food items that are still available in grocery stores. Steve ate weird and gross stuff so we don't have to.
posted by bobdow on Feb 19, 2015 - 44 comments

Not miniature, just small.

Want to make something just for you and your sweetie? Maybe two tiny cheesecakes? One dozen cookies? Four cupcakes? Small-batch baking blog Dessert for Two has you covered.
posted by Adridne on Feb 17, 2015 - 9 comments

How user perception matters - in zippers.

"a highly-automated, vertically-integrated manufacturer" Visit a zipper factory and see how a perceived design flaw translates into a more labor-intensive process. From the blog, bunnie: studios.
posted by joseph conrad is fully awesome on Feb 10, 2015 - 41 comments

When Scottish islands blogged

As part of an emerging online technologies project, the BBC set up Island Blogging in the early 2000s to allow residents of three groups of sparsely populated and often windswept Scottish islands (the Outer Hebrides or Western Isles, Argyll and Clyde Islands and the Northern Isles) to blog for free. As nearly all were on often unreliable dial-up, the service was simple and web-based, allowing comments (by anyone) and posts and pictures (blogging residents only). Moderation and rules were light; controversies were infrequent. [more inside]
posted by Wordshore on Jan 9, 2015 - 26 comments

Nothing new under the sun

So how did medieval readers locate books, especially when they owned a lot of them? The answer lies in a neat trick that resembles our modern GPS : a book was tagged with a unique identifier (a shelfmark) that was entered into a searchable database (a library catalogue), which could subsequently be consulted with a handheld device (a portable version of the catalogue). Here is how to plot the route to a specific book in the medieval library.
[more inside] posted by infini on Dec 13, 2014 - 18 comments

Parable of the Polygons

A playable blog post about triangles, squares, bias, and society from Vi Hart and Nicky Case.
posted by cthuljew on Dec 8, 2014 - 22 comments

\|/ \|/ \|/ \|/ practical (& fun) conservation in coppicing \|/ \|/ \|/

It is easy to think of woodlands as wild places, but in the UK and Europe, most have been carefully managed for centuries. If you visit an ancient woodland in Europe at this time of year, you may well see small areas where the trees are being cut down to the base, but the stumps left behind. This is likely to be part of a traditional woodland practice called coppicing. Until about 150 years ago, most deciduous woodlands in the UK were coppiced to produce wood for use in a variety of industries, but today coppicing is largely only practised for woodland conservation. [more inside]
posted by joseph conrad is fully awesome on Oct 22, 2014 - 22 comments

Can I make this without the ingredients?

All The Comments on Every Recipe Blog is a list of, well, the most common comments on every recipe blog.
posted by GuyZero on Oct 6, 2014 - 191 comments

A confession from mimi smartypants

Online diarist mimi smartypants has been typing about her life for just over fifteen years, and now she's considering quitting the gig. "Next week marks fifteen years of this online diary thing, and I have been toying with the idea that maybe that is quite enough, thank you. In fact, I had not updated in so long that I sat down to type a mic-drop “thanks for the memories”-style entry, but then this crap came out instead. So maybe I’m not quite done yet? I don’t know." [more inside]
posted by danabanana on Sep 26, 2014 - 25 comments


"What a bizarre day. I'm sitting here watching my email fill up with message after message from people from so many different times and places of my life, all congratulating me for the astonishing good fortune of receiving a MacArthur Fellowship. Not to mention a flurry of texts and tweets, and I haven't had the energy to even look at Facebook." Cartoonist and Graphic Memoirist Alison Bechdel (previously on MetaFilter: 1, 2, 3, 4) has won the prestigious MacArthur Genuis grant, giving her the opportunity to dig into her archives for a previous comic she drew in 2004 to conclude her reaction blog post. [more inside]
posted by joseph conrad is fully awesome on Sep 24, 2014 - 32 comments

it was the year my life was saved

I had a stroke at 33—On New Year’s Eve 2007, a clot blocked one half of my brain from the other. My reality would never be the same again. [more inside]
posted by and they trembled before her fury on Sep 22, 2014 - 23 comments

What will time be like in 100 years?

Ten different blog title generators
posted by oceanjesse on Sep 17, 2014 - 22 comments

food IS a theme park

The Disney Food Blog offers in-depth news, reviews, and information about food and restaurants in Disney’s parks, resorts, and cruise ships, along with reviews and photographs of and about anything food-related in Disney parks, resorts, movies, and events. Disney food FAQs. Disney food news.
posted by Room 641-A on Sep 15, 2014 - 50 comments

Sweet Treats for the Kids (SLYT)

“Goddamit, I ain’t got no motherf--n’ name for it yet, motherf--ker!” (language NSFW)
posted by danabanana on Sep 14, 2014 - 43 comments

Americanah's Ifemelu returns to life on her blog

Last year, Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie created Ifemelu, the protagonist and blogger in her novel “Americanah,” one of the smartest and sharpest chronicles of contemporary life on three continents. Now, readers can catch up with Ifemelu through “The Small Redemptions of Lagos,” at AmericanahBlog.com. This new blog focuses on Ifemelu’s life in Nigeria, a kind of younger sibling to the novel’s incendiary and anonymous blog, “Raceteenth or Various Observations about American Blacks (Those Formerly Known as Negros) by a Non-American Black.” The new installment is no less expressive. Ifemelu’s observations are piercing, even on such subjects as a leaky roof at a Lagos airport or a friend who needs to take better care of herself: “Don’t expect water to taste like Coke. It is not Coke. It is water. And it is better for you.” VIA
posted by infini on Sep 8, 2014 - 8 comments

True Music Facts Wednesday

True Music Facts Wednesday is an amazing labor of love from AgentRocket. [via MeFi Projects]
posted by Johnny Wallflower on Sep 5, 2014 - 8 comments

Magical Realism Menu

Tables For One is a collection of restaurant reviews "from another New York City" by A. Ponitus and illustrated by Evan Johnson. The restaurants include Frito-Lay themed places, salt-obsessed aliens, a gelato cult, notable NPR personalities, and a cafe for heartbreak.
posted by The Whelk on Aug 14, 2014 - 21 comments

Go Ahead, read my stuff.

Go Ahead, read my stuff.
I suppose, that if someone had predicted to me, in the directionless, drifting ennui right after my graduation from high school, that within two years, I would be trekking across Thailand by oxcart and having run-ins with groups of armed guerrillas, I’d have scoffed and asked for a bowl of whatever it was they were smoking.
[via mefi projects]
posted by jillithd on Aug 7, 2014 - 6 comments

traditional urbanism

A Traditional City Primer [more inside]
posted by flex on Jul 30, 2014 - 23 comments


DataGenetics is "a technology consultancy specializing in unlocking the value stored in large databases" and which runs an interesting blog. [more inside]
posted by alby on Jul 28, 2014 - 2 comments

Bloggers review the It-bag of the moment: the Michael Kors Selma handbag

Michael Kors has been causing a bit of a sensation in the fashion world recently, as the popularity of the designer's handbags, and in particular, one handbag—called "the Selma"—threatens to dethrone Coach as the luxury brand to buy (some say it already has). The Guardian notes that in the Kors line of handbags, "The details are right: the gold studs on the base, a practical touch so that you can rest the bag on the floor; a printed silk lining; a phone pocket. But the most important detail is very, very simple: the magic £300 price tag." Obsessions and the internet go hand in hand, so here are some of the best reviews of Selma handbags from bloggers who want to share their knowledge with other handbag enthusiasts. [more inside]
posted by joseph conrad is fully awesome on Jul 21, 2014 - 451 comments

useful websites

101 Useful Websites is "a frequently updated list of lesser-known but wonderful websites and cool web apps. Here are some of the most useful websites on the internet that you may not know about. These web sites, well most of them, solve at least one problem really well and they all have simple web addresses (URLs) that you can memorize thus saving you a trip to Google." [more inside]
posted by flex on Jul 20, 2014 - 16 comments

An honest open discourse concerning this silly love of Disney

"I mean, seriously we're adorable. How could we have a blog that didn't feature us up front and center? ;)" Meet Adam and Andrew. They blog about the aesthetics of Disney. Those little details that are found in all aspects of Disney parks (and related materials): bathroom signs, murals (bathrooms again), vintage Dumbo book illustrations, Epcot's UK (part of their Shake to Randomize series), Theming At Animal Kingdom's Serka Zong Bazaar, and Six Things I DON'T Hate About The Italy Pavilion At Epcot. (In fact The whole month of June 2012 is a treasure.) There's also a podcast.
posted by joseph conrad is fully awesome on Jul 16, 2014 - 21 comments

They all have optimal strategies but pursue different victory conditions

Big Game Theory! Board games that tell stories. The Bored Gaymer. A girl likes games. HiveGod's Yell Matrix. QWERTYUIOP. 365 Days of Gaming. Those are a few of the most favorited current blogs on BoardGameGeek, and these are a few of their most favorited posts. [more inside]
posted by Monsieur Caution on Jul 15, 2014 - 17 comments

"The most endlessly fascinating specialty in all of medicine."

Dr. Mark Crislip is a Infectious Disease specialist—an ID doc. He's also the master of a vast* multimedia empire, all parts of which are inflected with his insistence upon scientific evidence and many with a dry, sarcastic sense of humor: the president of the Society for Science-Based Medicine, he also writes articles for the affiliated website Science-Based Medicine; he runs the Quackcast, a podcast that reviews Supplements, Complementary and Alternative Medicines (SCAMs) from an evidence-based perspective; the Persiflagers Infectious Disease Puscast, which reviews the infectious disease literature; and his blog on Medscape, Rubor, Dolor, Calor, Tumor, is the basis for the third of his podcasts (and my favorite): A Gobbet O' Pus. As Crislip puts it: "A cool ID case, a stupid joke and a factoid you can use. What more do you need?" *For certain quantities of vast. [more inside]
posted by ocherdraco on Jul 9, 2014 - 14 comments

Blog of the Centre for Imperial and Global History-University of Exeter

This blog will keep you up half the night when you should be trying to sleep for an early morning meeting. The post The Secret History Behind Today’s Algeria-Germany #WorldCup Match being timely and tweeted is what brought it to my attention. But what to share? There is so much good stuff, that the rabbit hole beckons...
posted by infini on Jun 30, 2014 - 581 comments

The Hairpin on YouTube Beauty Vloggers

My Imaginary Friends: The Beauty YouTuber Economy [more inside]
posted by danabanana on Jun 29, 2014 - 32 comments

Rob the Bouncer has left the club

Bob Ihlenfeldt, aka Rob Fitzgerald, aka Rob the Bouncer, died recently. I started reading about his exploits as a bouncer years ago. I bought his book. I didn't know that he was also the Angry Coach at EliteFTS. Here is the last post on his later blog. He was always an excellent writer.
posted by philquadra on Jun 28, 2014 - 21 comments

The best 143 songs of all time

Andrew Collins started a blog in July 2013 - Circles of Life: The 143 - he's about half way through now. [more inside]
posted by unliteral on May 21, 2014 - 32 comments

I hope they all get ripped apart by wild animals.

This is a collection of Francisco "Puree Tomatoes" Taccir's blog posts from Myspace and Friendster from 2005 – 2010. Tomatoes was a writer, artist, and addict who was born on February 26. 1977. He died on October 10, 2010 from a heroin overdose. [more inside]
posted by item on May 20, 2014 - 7 comments

Two Muddy Pills

On the 10th anniversary of his wildly popular blog, Joe.My.God published Two Muddy Pills, a previously unpublished true story.
posted by roomthreeseventeen on Apr 29, 2014 - 17 comments

Dying Of The Light

"These people want to believe in a false reality, they want to believe in conspiracy theories, they want to believe that their government is evil, they want to believe that the biblical Anti-Christ sits in the White House and that the so-called End Times are upon us, they want to believe that the President is plotting their demise because that justifies their hatred and bigotry and their miserable unhappiness." Jim Wright, retired naval officer, occasional military intelligence consultant, craftsman and blogger, illustrates the process by which the media exploits lazy critical thinking to create a false narrative that alienates us from one another.
posted by Lou Stuells on Apr 23, 2014 - 53 comments


Future 52. Fifty-two weeks, fifty-two creators, fifty-two creations of Hoverboards, Robots, Starships, Wearables, and Energy Weapons.
posted by cashman on Apr 8, 2014 - 4 comments

Keepin' the Sea Free of Debris!

Interested in items that have washed ashore years after a tsunami? Crab trap rodeos? Art from floating trash? The NOAA Marine Debris Program has a blog for you. [more inside]
posted by MonkeyToes on Mar 17, 2014 - 11 comments

Data journalism

Nate Silver's FiveThirtyEight re-launched this morning. Opening manifesto. Building an NCAA bracket. An article about a computer program to count how many lines each pair of characters in “Romeo and Juliet” spoke to each other. Toilet seat covers. 2014 midterms. And why this winter is so miserable. Among other gems.
posted by roomthreeseventeen on Mar 17, 2014 - 79 comments

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