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"Can you deal with the fact that I'm not in love with you?"

Without You I'm Nothing: The Believer looks at the memoirs of the wives and girlfriends of rock stars.
posted by The Whelk on Jul 4, 2014 - 20 comments

Tell me behind what door your treasure lies

149 previously-unknown Bob Dylan acetate recordings were recently discovered in two boxes labelled "Old Records" in the back of a closet on W. Houston Street in New York City. [more inside]
posted by sockermom on Jul 2, 2014 - 41 comments

The best 143 songs of all time

Andrew Collins started a blog in July 2013 - Circles of Life: The 143 - he's about half way through now. [more inside]
posted by unliteral on May 21, 2014 - 32 comments

JB and Bobby D, together at last

My head just exploded because the the two epic spiraling vortexes of iconic American pop have met and merged and made my head explode and it's exploded. Like a Rolling Sex Machine.
posted by flapjax at midnite on Apr 9, 2014 - 17 comments

So it's come to this: The canonization of Bob Dylan's 1980s albums.

"Dylan was bad in the '80s because to be anything else would've been dishonest." Steven Hyden (who else?) has found a way to appreciate '80s Dylan: "It's about appreciating the subtext of records that are more fun to think about than to listen to."
posted by paleyellowwithorange on Apr 1, 2014 - 60 comments

WHERE'S ITS SCROTUM?!

Though Llewyn appears stuck, he’s the nomad always ecstatic in his circumlocutions. He’s on a road to nowhere but at least trudging on a path to somewhere. The rest of the world marks time, gliding smoothly along the straight line of the future, arrested comfortably in the steady flow of the ever-present, and being naively present relieves one from the nightmare of history. Maybe the materialization of Dylan’s music in the final minutes, when it wasn’t there in the beginning, is another sign that Llewyn’s time has passed, and it’s time to, um, face the music. Like clockwork he goes into the alley to confront the shadowy figure, and takes his punch (this time not saying “I’m sorry?” before the fist collides with his face, however). Consigned again to this cesspool, he doesn't stay down but ascends through iron bar shadows and follows his bellicose aggressor, who gets into a cab and drives off. Llewyn looks on somewhat wistfully, not saying “farewell” in accord with Dylan but rather says “Au revoir”—indicating they’ll see each other again. At that quiet utterance the cab’s wheels screech and turn a sharp corner. The linear trajectory forward is thwarted and Fate's Emissary will inevitably come around again. The Orbital Noose: Inside Llewyn Davis
posted by timshel on Mar 26, 2014 - 25 comments

The Greatest Music Producer You’ve Never Heard of

Texas Monthly profiles Tom Wilson, a Harvard-educated Republican from Waco who helped launch the careers of Bob Dylan, Simon and Garfunkel, Lou Reed, and a few other musicians you might have heard of. Previously.
posted by aka burlap on Jan 10, 2014 - 5 comments

TV Talkin' Song

"Martha, call the cable company--it's playing 'Like a Rolling Stone' on every channel again!"
posted by Horace Rumpole on Nov 19, 2013 - 45 comments

Every one of them words rang true, and glowed like burning coal

Shelter From The Storm – the inside story of Bob Dylan’s Blood On The Tracks [more inside]
posted by KokuRyu on Nov 15, 2013 - 28 comments

I refuse to make a single "gates" or "Flashdance" pun in this title

Bob Dylan is a welder and he makes big iron gates out of scrap metal. You can see for yourself at Castle Gallery in London for the next couple of months. Says Bob: "Gates appeal to me because of the negative space they allow. They can be closed but at the same time they allow the seasons and breezes to enter and flow. They can shut you out or shut you in. And in some ways there is no difference."
posted by maudlin on Nov 14, 2013 - 48 comments

Another place I Will Never Live - The Chelsea Hotel

Interiors of the Chelsea Hotel
posted by y2karl on Oct 16, 2013 - 30 comments

Producer Tom Wilson

WMFU DJ Irwin Chusid has put together a tribute website to music producer Tom Wilson. Wilson was born in 1931 and died young at 47 in 1978. Among the musicians he worked with: Sun Ra, Cecil Taylor, Bob Dylan, Simon & Garfunkel, Pete Seeger, The Mothers of Invention, The Velvet Underground, Nico, Gil-Scott Heron, and Professor Longhair. Some of his notable and more far-out productions, include the Bob Dylan "Like a Rolling Stone" session which was the subject of the much repeated Al Kooper organ riff anecdote. He had been president of Harvard's Young Republican club, graduated Harvard cum laude, and was African-American. He was also friends with Wally "Famous" Amos, and it was through Wilson, that Amos, at the time an agent at William Morris, came to represent Simon & Garfunkel.
posted by larrybob on Sep 9, 2013 - 5 comments

People got their money's worth that night!

Here's the entire show (audio only) from Landover, Maryland, January 15, 1974, by Bob Dylan and The Band.
posted by flapjax at midnite on Aug 16, 2013 - 11 comments

but I'll dream of pretty Saro wherever I go...

Bob Dylan ran through the 18th century English folk song "Pretty Saro" six consecutive times during the Self Portrait sessions in March 1970, but none of those versions made the final cut for the album and the song remained in Columbia's vault for the past 43 years, until now. Bob Dylan's Lost 1970 Gem 'Pretty Saro' - Premiere
posted by flapjax at midnite on Aug 7, 2013 - 14 comments

Scenes from Renaldo and Somebody or Other

Nearly one hundred and ten out of at least two hundred and ninety two minutes of Renaldo and Somebody or Other... [more inside]
posted by y2karl on Mar 29, 2013 - 11 comments

A Folk Singer with a Cat

Trailer for Inside Llewyn Davis - the new film by the Coen brothers possibly inspired by the album cover for The Freewheeling' Bob Dylan.
posted by Artw on Jan 25, 2013 - 49 comments

Songs for the Apocalypse

Rock Cellar Magazine has come up with a list of eleven songs to listen to in case the world comes to an end on December 21 2010. [more inside]
posted by Sailormom on Dec 19, 2012 - 44 comments

His Zombie Bullfrog Holler

What does Bob Dylan's voice sound like? Opinions differ (possible understatement alert) . But that hasn't stopped people from trying to explain how to listen to Bob Dylan (previously on Metafilter). But what happens when Dylan's voice is held up to an academic's magnifying glass? Or amplifier, as the metaphorical case may be? University of Chicago professor of music Steven Rings, a proponent of a branch of music theory known as transformational theory and author of Tonality And Transformation (in-depth review), offers one such perspective in his lecture Here's Your Throat Back, Thanks for the Loan: On Dylan's Voices (runtime 41:50)
posted by Perko on Dec 16, 2012 - 96 comments

Farewell Angelina by Joan Baez, Bob Dylan and Nana Mouskouri, among others

Audio only, Newport 1966: Joan Baez - Farewell Angelina
Recorded Jan. 13, 1965, released 1991: Bob Dylan - Farewell Angelina
B/W Video 1966 Joan Baez - Farewell Angelina
Tablature and lyrics following those of the Dylan recording: dylanchords: Farewell Angelina
French TV 1967: Nana Mouskouri - Adieu Angélina
Bratislava 1989, avant de la Révolution de velours: Joan Baez - Farewell Angelina
From the 90s, or so I believe: Nickle Creek - Farewell Angelina
June 19, 2010 at Kidzstock: Joan Baez and Jasmine Harris - Farewell Angelina [more inside]
posted by y2karl on Dec 7, 2012 - 33 comments

Photographer Ken Regan Passes from The Scene

On Nov. 25th, Ken Regan, iconic photographer of rock icons such as Bob Dylan, the Rolling Stones (among many others) died of cancer. A spokesperson for his studio declined to give Regan's age, calling him "ageless." A GQ interview from late last year. A gallery of 16 of his images, and another gallery of 25 images. His (Flash required) web site's biography and portfolio. A one hour phone interview (warning: insufferable 3-1/2 minute pre-interview ad).
posted by spock on Nov 28, 2012 - 2 comments

Monty Python's "Go Hang a Salami, I'm a Lasagna Hog"

38 Fake Film Titles to the Tune of "Bob" by 'Weird Al' Yankovic made by Oliver Smith in which an aspiring animator has created a tour-de-force (and tour-de-farce) showreel of kinetic typography and film homages using the palindromic lyrics of The Weird One's Bob Dylan riff (with a few actor and director credits tossed in to remind you what he's referencing). If Oliver Smith doesn't get a ton of job offers from this, the animation biz is broken.
posted by oneswellfoop on Nov 19, 2012 - 16 comments

What's Dylan Grillin'?

Bob Dylan says, "Betcha can't guess what I'm grillin'!" [more inside]
posted by Rory Marinich on Nov 15, 2012 - 25 comments

Zeugma, syllepsis, ellipsis

In Praise of the Rolling Stones and Their Zeugmoids [more inside]
posted by the man of twists and turns on Nov 11, 2012 - 13 comments

Great White Wonder: Bob Dylan and the birth of Rock Bootlegs and Album Leaks

In the summer of 1969, two guys pressed a few thousand records with white label stickers, and packaged them in nondescript white sleeves. They didn't have their own cars to deliver the records so they borrowed friends' cars, and the record ended up throughout California, with copies getting airplay at 5 southern California radio stations. The music wasn't their own recordings, but unreleased material from Bob Dylan. The recording became known as the Great White Wonder, "the entertainment industry's first truly hip situation comedy" (in other words, the first bootleg ever to be produced in the rock-and-roll era). [more inside]
posted by filthy light thief on Oct 3, 2012 - 24 comments

"Why was I not alive and making music when there was a Black catagory?"

Every so often, the editorial staff at Grantland e-mail 25-year-old Rembert Browne a video from the 1980s that he hasn't seen before. Ladies and gentlement: Rembert Explains the 80s. My personal faves:
The 1985 American Music Awards: "LOOK. AT. LIONEL'S JACKET."
Bob Dylan Rehearses 'We Are the World': "I have to remind myself not to lose sight of the fact that Stevie Wonder, Bob Dylan, Quincy Jones, and Lionel Richie are in the same room making music together. Oh, and Diana Ross and Dionne Warwick are shooting dice and smoking Virginia Slims in the corner." [more inside]
posted by Diablevert on Sep 9, 2012 - 110 comments

Bob Dylan’s “Titanic” anticipated by Tim Heidecker

Rumor has it that Bob Dylan's upcoming album Tempest will feature a 14-minute song about the sinking of the Titanic, which seems pretty plausible, right? The guy has written about the Titanic before, and he likes to tell long, repetitive stories, not unlike your very talented Grandpa. Well, Tim Heidecker (of Tim & Eric Awesome Show, Great Job!) has decided to try and anticipate Mr. Dylan's song, creating his own epic that encompasses not only the amazing, historically accurate tale of the ill-fated ship, but also the adventures of a movie pirate named James Cameron.
posted by porn in the woods on Jul 24, 2012 - 37 comments

He Said, She Said, Starring Bob Dylan and a $1 Million Guitar.

Bob Dylan famously "went electric" at the Newport Folk Festival in 1965. 47 years later, experts believe a woman in New Jersey has the guitar the Dylan played on stage that day. [more inside]
posted by COD on Jul 13, 2012 - 46 comments

Take Me Back to Tulsa

A remarkably diverse group of legendary musicians have graced the stage of Tulsa's Cain's Ballroom over the years: Jerry Lee Lewis, Little Richard, the Sex Pistols (one of seven stops on their one and only 1978 U.S. tour…the hole in the drywall left by Sid Vicious’ fist is still backstage), the Ramones, Bob Dylan, Willie Nelson, Blondie, The Talking Heads, U2, Ani DiFranco, Elvis Costello, Snoop Dogg, Morrissey, Beck, Wilco, to name a few. A documentary featuring Costello and several other artists who’ve played there is in the works, with proceeds supporting music education in Oklahoma and the upcoming Cain’s Ballroom Museum. Cain’s was recently named one of the top 10 live music venues in the U.S. From 1935 to 1942, Cain’s was home to Bob Wills and The Texas Playboys, who popularized western swing music with weekly dances and a national radio show.
posted by Kelly Tulsa on May 9, 2012 - 12 comments

Aha! The anatomy of insight, like a rolling stone.

How do we have insights, and where does inspiration come from? Jonah Lehrer goes inside Bob Dylan's brain to find out...the "neural correlate of insight": the anterior superior temporal gyrus (aSTG). This small fold of tissue, located on the surface of the right hemisphere just above the ear, became unusually active in the seconds before the epiphany. [more inside]
posted by nickyskye on Apr 7, 2012 - 22 comments

I'll let you be in my dreams if I can be in yours

During Bob Dylan’s tour for his third LP, The Times They Are a-Changin’, released in January 1964, the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation offered him a half-hour special in which to promote the album. More info.
posted by timshel on Feb 24, 2012 - 20 comments

You shall Hear things, Wonderful to tell

A decade on, the Coen brothers' woefully underrated O Brother, Where Art Thou? [alt] is remembered for a lot of things: its sun-drenched, sepia-rich cinematography (a pioneer of digital color grading), its whimsical humor, fluid vernacular, and many subtle references to Homer's Odyssey. But one part of its legacy truly stands out: the music. Assembled by T-Bone Burnett, the soundtrack is a cornucopia of American folk music, exhibiting everything from cheery ballads and angelic hymns to wistful blues and chain-gang anthems. Woven into the plot of the film through radio and live performances, the songs lent the story a heartfelt, homespun feel that echoed its cultural heritage, a paean and uchronia of the Old South. Though the multiplatinum album was recently reissued, the movie's medley is best heard via famed documentarian D. A. Pennebaker's Down from the Mountain, an extraordinary yet intimate concert film focused on a night of live music by the soundtrack's stars (among them Gillian Welch, Emmylou Harris, Chris Thomas King, bluegrass legend Dr. Ralph Stanley) and wryly hosted by John Hartford, an accomplished fiddler, riverboat captain, and raconteur whose struggle with terminal cancer made this his last major performance. The film is free in its entirety on Hulu and YouTube -- click inside for individual clips, song links, and breakdowns of the set list's fascinating history. [more inside]
posted by Rhaomi on Dec 22, 2011 - 107 comments

Anything You Can do I Can do Better

In honor of William Shatner's latest album (Previously here and here): here are a few surprising and cross genre covers. Some work well, others are Tiny Tim. Track info and links to the originals inside. [more inside]
posted by Gygesringtone on Oct 21, 2011 - 10 comments

mama put my guns in the ground -- I can't use them anymore

...after enrolling in public school and moving to Montana — a predominantly white state, albeit one with a decidedly hippie-ish vibe — Lamb and Lynx decided they simply no longer believed what they’d been taught. Prussian Blue, five years later. Previously, previously.
posted by gerryblog on Jul 17, 2011 - 105 comments

He's Got Everything He Needs, He's An Artist He Don't Look back

Bob Dylan is 70 today.
posted by Xurando on May 24, 2011 - 210 comments

I was so much older then. I’m younger than that now

Bob Dylan turns 70 next Tuesday. Why not start the party early by listening to 2ser's annual Bob Dylan Birthday Marathon on Saturday? It's streaming online from 7pm, Sydney time. Dylan has recently denied that China censored his shows, an allegation levelled against him by Maureen Dowd but opposed by Sean Wilentz.
posted by Lovecraft In Brooklyn on May 19, 2011 - 28 comments

One Glance Back

Horace Freeland Judson died last Friday at the age of 80. Though his greatest achievement was The Eighth Day of Creation, a detailed account of modern breakthroughs in molecular biology, he was more famously the haplass TIME reporter harranged at length by Bob Dylan in Don't Look Back.
posted by joannemullen on May 12, 2011 - 25 comments

Mr. Leonard Bernstein Explains It All For You

Inside Pop - The Rock Revolution is a CBS News special, broadcast in April 1967. The show was hosted by Leonard Bernstein and is probably one of the first examples of pop music being examined as a 'serious' art form. The film features many scenes shot in Los Angeles in late 1966, including interviews with Frank Zappa and Graham Nash, as well as the now legendary Brian Wilson solo performance of "Surf's Up." (MLYT) [more inside]
posted by overeducated_alligator on Apr 29, 2011 - 15 comments

I gave her my heart, but she wanted my soul

Suze Rotolo, artist, muse and covergirl has died, aged 67. She was Bob Dylan's lover and muse meeting him soon after he moved from Minnesota to New York in 1961. An artist in her own right, Suze explored the idea of books as artefacts, focusing on their appearance rather than their contents. She also published a memoir of early 1960's Greenwich Village. Ironically for an artist concerned with paratext she will most likely be remembered as the girl from the cover of Freewheelin', Dylan's early masterpiece. The image of Rotolo and Dylan strolling along a frosty Jones Street has fixed itself in the popular consciousness and is one that Tom Cruise will take to his death.
posted by tigrefacile on Feb 27, 2011 - 17 comments

A Soundtrack of Love and Heartbreak, curated by 50+ artists

eMusic has a collection of more than 50 artists reflecting on love songs, from Andreya Triana (Coldplay's "Yellow" reminds of her first love and heartbreak), to Yuki Chikudate (from Asobi Seksu) (Debbie Gibson's "Lost in Your Eyes" brings back the innocent early-elementary school crushes), and Dan Deacon (who heard Yo La Tengo's "Shadows" after a sucky breakup). All songs mentioned are linked below the break. [more inside]
posted by filthy light thief on Feb 14, 2011 - 5 comments

Bringing It All Back Home

50 Years Ago This Week, Bob Dylan Arrived in New York City
posted by Xurando on Feb 3, 2011 - 27 comments

"I just don't know what the limit is!" - Earl Scruggs

In 1969 banjo virtuoso and bluegrass innovator Earl Scruggs parted ways with his longtime musical partner Lester Flatt and the band they led to great popularity and acclaim, The Foggy Mountain Boys. Scruggs wanted to push his musical gifts as far as they could go. In 1970 he was the subject of a PBS documentary where he played with artists such as Bob Dylan, Doc Watson, The Morris Brothers, The Byrds, Charlie Daniels, Bill Monroe, Joan Baez, various friends and family members, and even records a track accompanying a Moog. You can watch the whole thing online: Earl Scruggs, His Family and Friends.
posted by Kattullus on Jan 28, 2011 - 17 comments

Theme Time Radio Hour

Bob Dylan had a radio show, the Theme Time Radio Hour, from May 2006 to April 2009. The archive contains shows on themes such as Thanksgiving Leftovers, The Bible, and Women's Names (click on the arrows to download the full radio show).
posted by Copronymus on Dec 31, 2010 - 20 comments

Ry Cooder – Talking Country Blues and Gospel & The Jas Obrecht Music Archive

Originally published in Guitar Player magazine in 1990, here is Jas Obrect's interview: Ry Cooder – Talking Country Blues and Gospel -- I only wish it was online when I made my Dark was the Night post. Now is it is part of the Jas Obrect Music Archive, where you can also find ''Rollin’ and Tumblin' '': The Story of a Song (See also Hambone Wille Newbern - Roll and Tumble Blues for the first recording of those lyrics) -- not to mention Jerry Garcia: The Complete 1985 Interview and Bob Dylan’s ''Highway 61 Revisited'': Mike Bloomfield v. Johnny Winter and Blues Origins: Spanish Fandango and Sebastopol among many, many others. There is quite the cornucopia of interesting, informative music articles there. Check it out--you will dig it.
posted by y2karl on Dec 24, 2010 - 8 comments

Must Be Santa, over the years (now with more Dylan)

Must Be Santa was originally recorded (song on YT) in 1969 by Mitch Miller, with simple call-and-response lyrics that were a hit (song on YT) for Lorne Greene in 1966. The catchy song is amusing for small children, and cute when sung by groups of kids. With minor lyrical tweaks and a rowdy polka style (live clip), Brave Combo liven up the Christmas classic. Leave it to Bob Dylan to take it further. [more inside]
posted by filthy light thief on Dec 20, 2010 - 15 comments

Oonce Oonce

Oonce Oonce.
posted by Fiasco da Gama on Sep 27, 2010 - 59 comments

Dylanology

How to listen to Bob Dylan, a guide. [more inside]
posted by gman on Jul 14, 2010 - 171 comments

But no green bacon, man, that's where I draw the line.

Green Eggs and Ham: music by Dylan Hears a Who [previously previouslier], animation from Dr. Seuss on the Loose (1973). [more inside]
posted by not_on_display on Jun 15, 2010 - 5 comments

Preferred activity: blowin’ or a-changin’?

The Answer, My Friend. Your own personal Best Bob Dylan Album calculator.
posted by shakespeherian on Apr 20, 2010 - 59 comments

Screen Tests. Good, now 3/4 to the right. Full profile. Thank you.

The screen test offers a disorienting angle on 'behind the scenes' footage—straight through the camera. [more inside]
posted by carsonb on Feb 8, 2010 - 21 comments

Hey, Mr. Tambourine Man!... Say "Cheese!"

Dr. John Rudoff is a cardiologist in Oregon, but before he entered medical school, he was the staff photographer at The Main Point, a coffeehouse in Bryn Mawr, PA associated with the early 1960s folk revival in the Philadelphia area. His photographs of the Philadelphia folk scene include unidentified local folkies, but also touring folk singers such as Dave van Ronk and John Hammond. Eventually, Rudoff got a press pass to the 1965 Newport Folk Festival, where he took photos of Mary Travers sharing a moment with Mimi and Dick Fariña and Joan Baez with a pre-psychedelicized Chambers Brothers, but the most amazing discovery of all are the photos of when Bob Dylan "went electric." And now you can see Rudoff's whole collection, thanks to the magic of Flickr.
posted by jonp72 on May 7, 2009 - 13 comments

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