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Remembering Beckett

'You really liked it, huh? You really thought it was good?'
He regaled one friend with memories of being in the womb, took another shopping for jerseys in Paris, and said he regretted calling his play Godot. As the centenary of his birth approaches, 'Beckett Remembering Remembering Beckett'. More inside.
posted by matteo on Feb 26, 2006 - 16 comments

By the book

HarperCollins is the first major publisher to give away an entire version of a new book online, revenue being raised through Yahoo! ads. But they don't seem to be 100% committed - if you go to their website you can pay $18.26 for the e-book and no mention is made of it being available free at the author's own website. [Appropriately the book, "Go it Alone" by Bruce Judson is about entrepreneurial ideas]
posted by meech on Feb 15, 2006 - 6 comments

oh, schader

Bloggers make terrible novelists. Ana Marie Cox's "Dog Days" meets a reader.
posted by The Jesse Helms on Jan 3, 2006 - 42 comments

Barley for Harley

Mr. Gonopolis and his 12 Holsteins. It’s December 24th and Santa gets the measles. Mr. Gonopolis, a bumbling dairy farmer from Minnesota and member of the Emergency Substitute Santa Claus Corps, gets the call and hitches up his 12 Holstein cows. Following a custom of naming cows after people he admires, for the 20th anniversary edition of his children’s book Uncle Hyggly renamed one of the cows “Oprah” and got into some hot water. Even so, this book is a welcome alternative to other cow temptation (NSF Farmers).
posted by luckypozzo on Dec 28, 2005 - 15 comments

An analysis of the covert action teams in Munich

The Israeli Response to the 1972 Munich Olympic Massacre and the Development of Independent Covert Action Teams is a very interesting 1995 military paper for background and analysis of the Israeli response to the slaughter of Jewish Olympians in 1972. This hot topic is at issue in Spielberg's controversial new film Munich. The film is based on a book by journalist George Jonas and a self-proclaimed Mossad agent, Yuval Aviv. The book also served as the basis for the 1986 movie Sword of Gideon.
posted by dios on Dec 27, 2005 - 58 comments

The Art Of War

At least one commander told him, "Follow the soldiers' instructions, because they'll put their lives at risk to save you." But no one tried to censor his drawings or discourage him from going out on missions. -- Steve Mumford is a New York painter who was embedded as a "combat artist" in Iraq. The archives of his Baghdad Journal make for fascinating reading. He has recently published a large book of the art he created on this voyage.
posted by Gator on Dec 18, 2005 - 9 comments

Listening Book - let there be sound

...lights, sounds, rhythms, pulsating your bones, moving your body, we all know this language, we can all sing and dance...
posted by loquacious on Nov 29, 2005 - 5 comments

God's Debris by Scott Adams for free

God's Debris by Scott Adams (of Dilbert fame) is now available for free in PDF form. It's a controversial book that presents a philosophically strange view of the universe. According to Adams, it splits readers between "the best book they've ever read" and "an insult to literature and a disservice to humanity".
posted by Plutor on Nov 18, 2005 - 44 comments

Fisk Interview

Staggering reading by Robert Fisk then an interview with Fisk by Amy Goodman - from a 9/2005 program at the ever-wonderful Lannan Foundation.
posted by nromanek on Nov 8, 2005 - 18 comments

John James Audubon: The Birds of America

Harmonie/Harmony: a beautiful flash of birds,poetry imbedded 435 clicks
posted by hortense on Oct 29, 2005 - 8 comments

I just love how the baby peers out.

How Babies are Made in Germany. A book for children. (Possibly NSFW.)
posted by thebabelfish on Oct 23, 2005 - 56 comments

Party like a rock star...on the cheap.

Party like a rock star...on the cheap. For only $12,95, a book by freelance writer Camper English reveals low-budget secrets like: * pick up money from the floor on clubs * don't pay for drinks, use a flask * take your girlfriend out to "first one free" (link may be NSFW) salsa classes * get a student ID for discounts, even if you're not a student. (Via Lifehacker)
posted by iviken on Oct 2, 2005 - 28 comments

WANT.

Custom Flickr photo books & posters.
posted by Vidiot on Sep 7, 2005 - 23 comments

Help! Mom! Liberals! Bed!

Help! Mom! There are Liberals Under My Bed! (54 pp., illustrated, "The story of two boys who dream about opening a lemonade stand when a strange thing happens...") Don't miss the excerpt [pdf] and the "cast of 'characters'" links on the left. Feel free to skip the author's note. (via.)
posted by nobody on Aug 25, 2005 - 74 comments

Winnetou und Shatterhand

Unless you are German you may not have heard of Winnetou and Old Shatterhand, characters created by Karl May. A possible D.I.D. sufferer, he had never set foot in America and began to write his Wild West stories whilst in jail. Popular with readers across Europe, his books have been translated into over thirty different languages. Spaghetti Westerns partly came about because early 60s films [test your knowledge] based on his books, inspired Italian producers to invest in Westerns. His life story was made part of Syberberg's trilogy in 1974.
posted by tellurian on Aug 9, 2005 - 26 comments

Neil Gaiman

Neil Gaiman 1997 essay on the myth of artistic inspiration
posted by Pretty_Generic on Jul 19, 2005 - 26 comments

Congo Expedition 1909-1915

The Congo Expedition from 1909 to 1915. A decade after Joseph Conrad's Heart of Darkness first depicted the mysteries and agonies of the area, Herbert Lang and James Chapin set sail for the northeastern Belgian Congo. One of the many visual and auditory treats of this site is the delightful children's book, Where are you going, Manyoni? by Catherine Stock.
posted by nickyskye on Jun 25, 2005 - 9 comments

Neverwhere Comic Adaptation

The first issue of the comic book adaptation of Neil Gaiman's Neverwhere was released yesterday. Mr. Gaiman is credited as a "consultant." So far, the story is fairly intact, but it's the visual element that deviates from the novel--characters look nothing like they were described, and don't even resemble the old BBC miniseries. And for someone accustomed to the phenomenal artwork seen in most of Gaiman's previous graphic novels (which included several adaptations of his short stories), Neverwhere seems downright bland. If a feature film follows in the same vein as this adaptation, will Gaiman pull an Alan Moore and refuse all royalties? (Go easy on me; it's my first post.)
posted by Saellys on Jun 23, 2005 - 32 comments

Harry and the Potters

We play songs about books! Excited about the new Harry Potter book coming out? How about some quirky pop songs about our favorite wizard-in-training? Get some background on the band and then go check out one of their free shows.
posted by handshake on Jun 8, 2005 - 10 comments

A riddle wrapped in a maze wrapped in a book wrapped in a website

The Maze. From the annals of the Internet: Before there was The Riddle, there was this "virtual space in the shape of a book" based on the quaintly illustrated Maze by Christopher Manson. Find the shortest path in and out of the maze, from Room 1 to Room 45 (the center) and back. At Room 45 is another riddle, whose answer is concealed somewhere in that shortest path, which, if you are clever, you can make in only 16 steps. "Anything in this space might be a clue. Not all clues are necessarily trustworthy."
posted by Lush on Jun 8, 2005 - 25 comments

Scattered Leaves

Scattered Leaves In the early decades of the 20th century, a Cleveland book collector named Otto Ege removed the pages from 50 medieval manuscript books, divided the pages among 40 boxes, and sold the boxes around the world. Now the University of Saskatchewan plans to digitally remake the book.
posted by dhruva on May 28, 2005 - 32 comments

"All I wanted to do was record how all those poor people adapted to lies and suffering"

"Maybe this world is another planet's hell". Photographer Antonin Kratochvil's new book, "Vanishing" is a collection of 16 photo essays taken over 16 years by one of the world's most acclaimed photojournalists. It is a tour through endangered life forms and ruined environments, human catastrophes and destruction -- resulting in vanishing cultures. "Vanishing speaks on behalf of life, despite man's ever-threatening presence. This body of work offers nothing in the way of answers, neither is it a sermon in hopes of brighter days
posted by matteo on May 18, 2005 - 13 comments

Get Back in the Box

Get Back in the Box says Douglas Rushkoff in his upcoming book of the same name. Kris Krug interviewed Rushkoff last week just after he wrapped up writing. Apparently the author is going to explore how we're undergoing a renaissance of collaboration where identity is defined by connection to others. Douglas seems to be pulling together a lot of ideas that have been bubbling up in the blogosphere (a connected creative/technology class, social networks) but is business ready to hear his message? Sounds like he'll be well received by many webby people, but it remains to be seen how long the traditional definitions he challenges will remain - one generation, two maybe?

You may remember Rushkoff from the PBS Frontline series' Merchants of Cool and Persuaders. He's been discussed quite a bit before here on MeFi, 9 times in fact.
posted by will on Apr 22, 2005 - 19 comments

H.P. Lovecraft

"It is here, however -- perhaps 50 pages into this 800-plus page anthology -- that something begins to shift, and what was supposed to be sublime (but is actually ridiculous) becomes something that was supposed to be ridiculous, but is actually sublime."
Why H.P. Lovecraft is scary after all.
posted by Tlogmer on Apr 19, 2005 - 40 comments

Wall Street

Wall Street - How it Works, and for Whom, by Doug Henwood. Sold over 20,000 copies as paperback. Acclaimed by Crooked Timber. Available for free under a Creative Commons license (Amazon).
posted by andrew cooke on Apr 8, 2005 - 8 comments

The most addicting website since The Blue

[TheFaceBook]: It comes in the genre of LiveJournal, MySpace, and Friendster - except with a focus on digitally connecting pre-existing friendships on college campuses rather than finding new friends worldwide. Subsequently, it has thus far avoided the stigmas I’ve seen attached to its predecessors by non-users. Its use has skyrocketed: about 15% of my campus has signed up since this past winter. All of it through word-of-mouth. One of the neat tricks it does is show a visualization of your friends on the network in a spider webbed vectored graphic connecting them based on their mutual friendships. It’s also proven very useful in tracking down those “where do I know him/her?” names through a prominently displayed list showing up to two-degrees of separation to the mystery person. Oh, and you can send text messages to cell phones through it. Did I mention it also reminds you of birthdays?
posted by trinarian on Mar 19, 2005 - 29 comments

UK Shop Names

Because "Tanning Salon" just won't bring in the punters. Where its worth spending some money just to see the names show up on your credit card statement.
posted by bunglin jones on Mar 10, 2005 - 48 comments

A Butler...For You Head!

Hey, let's ask the Head Butler! A newish site devoted to giving you book, music, and film recommendations, and more. (more inside)
posted by braun_richard on Mar 7, 2005 - 12 comments

I believe 451 is the correct temperature...

Alabama lawmaker to introduce a novel new way to keep people from catching "the gay". I can hear the ACLU drooling from here. Does the state have any power to limit the books available in a public library?
posted by ozomatli on Feb 9, 2005 - 53 comments

They read books so you don't have to

The Digested Read at The Guardian reduces popular books to 400 words and a conclusion. Recent notables include Belle du Jour ("Sometimes I lie about my age to clients. Sometimes I even lie to my friends. I guess you must be wondering whether I'm lying now.") Crichton's State of Fear ("Author's note: I'm very, very clever and have read a lot and you're all stupid wishy-washy liberals.") and Tom Wolfe's I am Charlotte Simmons ("At least it covered her breasts, whatever they were. Charlotte knew men might want to touch them, but she didn't know why as she had never read Cosmopolitan.") Possibly NSFW if you have an employer with no sense of humor. On preview: Individual Digested Reads have been linked in previous discussions on Henry James and Camille Paglia.
posted by KirkJobSluder on Jan 17, 2005 - 9 comments

The DNA of Literature

The DNA of Literature. The Paris Review, with a grant from the National Endowment for the Arts, makes available free .pdfs of fifty years of interviews with leading writers.
posted by rushmc on Jan 12, 2005 - 7 comments

Place Project

Place Project. A suitcase with a camera and a blank book travelled the world. 35 designers have translated the world around them into their pages. After 18 months and 170.000 km it will be presented in Barcelona. November 23 - December 12, 2004.
posted by yoga on Dec 26, 2004 - 5 comments

IEDs vs. Wookiees

Rumsfeld, shmumsfeld. Indiana Jones to the rescue in The Battle for Falluja. "Militarily, the battle of Falluja was an unqualified success," says Bing West, the former assistant defense secretary whose not-yet-published book will be turned into the fast-paced actioner.
posted by digaman on Dec 18, 2004 - 38 comments

'Runaway': Alice's Wonderland

'Runaway': Alice's Wonderland Knockout of a book review by wonderful writer about a marvelous author: "JONATHAN FRANZEN I want to circle around Alice Munro's latest marvel, "Runaway," by taking some guesses at why her excellence so dismayingly exceeds her fame."
posted by Postroad on Nov 13, 2004 - 11 comments

How to Teach Kids About Drugs

It's Just A Plant: a children's story of marijuana "One night Jackie woke up past her bedtime. She smelled something funny in the air, so she walked down the hall to her parents' bedroom." Here's a new way for parents to teach their kids about drugs--through a brightly-illustrated children's book, not second-hand misinformation or Drug Warrior scare tactics. Parents, librarians, and booksellers, please take note. [via D'Alliance, the blog of the Drug Policy Alliance]
posted by Asparagirl on Nov 12, 2004 - 59 comments

The Interesting Yezidis

Devil Worship: The Sacred Books and Traditions of the Yezidiz, by Isya Joseph, 1919. 'This is one of the only public domain sources of information on the religious beliefs of the Yezidi, a small group originally from the northern region of Iraq. Although they speak Kurdish, they are a distinct population from the Kurds. The Yezidi are notable because they have been described as devil-worshippers, which has naturally led to constant persecution by the dominant Islamic culture of the region ... They have many unique beliefs, such as that the first Yezidi were created by Adam by parthenogenesis separately from Eve ... ' New on sacred-texts.com.
posted by plep on Sep 17, 2004 - 4 comments

biographical database on great ideas

Malaspina Great Books. A biographical database on culture, in categories.
posted by plexi on Sep 2, 2004 - 2 comments

Call me Ishmael...

Opening Hooks. You're in the bookstore, browsing the shelves for... something. You don't know what, exactly, you're looking for but you'll recognize it when you see it. Picking a book at random you open to the first page and begin to read. Two hours later you're home in bed with a mug of sweet tea, still reading.
posted by thebabelfish on Aug 29, 2004 - 65 comments

Remember that Retro Versus Metro Thing?

Remember this, from a few days back? Retro vs Metro? Well, the book is out, and the publishers have made it available for free download in pdf format. I've read the first chapter and so far it's pretty good.[more inside]
posted by condour75 on Aug 19, 2004 - 21 comments

Fop? moi?

Lord Whimsy--Mammal of Paradise --Essays, Charts, Trifles, and News. A COMPENDIUM of DEEDS and THOUGHTS never before seen in this, our Benighted Age; the BRILLIANCE of which cannot last long in our WORLD of MUD and TEARS.
posted by amberglow on Aug 18, 2004 - 7 comments

A film for those who read

"Stone Reader makes you want to pick up a great novel and consume it in one long gulp. It’s a love letter to literature and literacy, a bibliophile’s dream film, dedicated to the joys of fiction and the passions of those who need books like they need food, water and air." (The Dallas Morning News)
posted by rushmc on Aug 13, 2004 - 17 comments

G.O.P. D.O.A.

G.O.P. D.O.A., the new novel by Brooklyn-based Contemporary Press, just got denied a reprinting by St. Louis-based Plus Communications. Although they printed the first edition less than one month ago, the publisher says that their religious clients would be upset by the book's 'language' and have refused to reprint it.

I guess that is in the same spirit as Rev. Breedlove's attempt to rekindle the tradition of book burning earlier this month.
posted by Miyagi on Jul 28, 2004 - 12 comments

GeneModPuns

Genie Corp: The Splice Of Life. Creature Comforts [via BoingBoing]
posted by srboisvert on Jul 24, 2004 - 1 comment

Nous sommes toutes ...quoi?

America... through Europe's eyes Yes, there have been countless books and articles on this, but this is by far the best I've ever read. Part a review of the literature, part historical research, part personal reflection. it's a bit long though, so set some time aside. Hudson Review, via A&L Daily
posted by leotrotsky on Jul 23, 2004 - 39 comments

It turns out it wasn't Joe Klein

The anonymous author of Imperial Hubris has been revealed.
posted by sixpack on Jul 2, 2004 - 12 comments

Inside Lion's mind...

Lion Kimbo spent three months writing down every thought he had. And has written a free to download book telling you how you can do the same.... Though quite why you would want to is beyond me....
posted by brettski on Jul 2, 2004 - 15 comments

Anonymous

Everyone's favorite unidentified 22-year CIA veteran who used to hunt Osama bin Laden, Anonymous, is back with a new book, "Imperial Hubris: Why the West Is Losing the War on Terror," and suggests that al-Qaida may try to reward Bush before the election. Last year, Anonymous created a stir with another book and was interviewed on Nightline. If only he had a scramble suit, he could do a book tour.
posted by homunculus on Jun 23, 2004 - 19 comments

Mefite pens book, is better than the rest of us (save Miguel).

Remember dong_resin? Of course you do. He's a lovable rapscallion--an affable sort (I don't actually know him but play along). Well, some months back, Mr. Resin penned (in the virtual sense) a blog entry entitled Tink Hilton : One Dog Screaming, a piece about Paris Hilton told from the perspective of her dog. You may, if you're a fan of "the resin" (as I've never called him), have noticed he hasn't been around Metafilter (or his blog) all that often lately. Apparently, he has an explanation: it seems that someone from Warner Books saw the entry and asked him to write a short novel. The result? A short novel with a long name, The Tinkerbell Hilton Diaries : My Life Tailing Paris Hilton, which goes on sale in September.
disclaimer: I do not know the donger in any way, shape, or form, and my shilling (if it is perceived that way) is born out of unadulterated, likely unreciprocated, and clearly unnatural love (or maybe I just thought it was interesting: you decide).
posted by The God Complex on May 12, 2004 - 35 comments

The Coolest Book You Didn't Know You Needed.

The Coolest Book You Didn't Know You Needed. Do you have one?
posted by ZenMasterThis on Mar 26, 2004 - 19 comments

Rising Up and Rising Down

When is violence justified? I am now the proud owner of one of 3,500 copies of William T. Vollmann's 3,299-page study of violence, Rising Up and Rising Down, published by McSweeney's. The book (if you can call something that's seven volumes a "book") has gotten mixed reviews that lean toward positive: Scott McLemee, writing in the New York Times Book Review (reg. req.), called it a "flood of logorrhea," while Steven Moore (a literary critic notable for his work on another long-winded writer, William Gaddis) wrote in the Washington Post that it is an "achievement beyond the realm of mere mortals," comparing it to Sir James Frazer's The Golden Bough. This oral history tells the story behind how the book came to be published at McSweeney's, and is an interesting look at what needs to happen for a difficult-to-market work to make its way from its author to the general reading public, in a publishing industry that's unfriendly to this kind of thing, to say the least.
posted by Prospero on Mar 12, 2004 - 16 comments

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