Join 3,514 readers in helping fund MetaFilter (Hide)

46 posts tagged with Books by stbalbach.
Displaying 1 through 46 of 46.

Related tags:
+ (294)
+ (169)
+ (127)
+ (125)
+ (115)
+ (100)
+ (92)
+ (89)
+ (79)
+ (72)
+ (67)
+ (63)
+ (59)
+ (51)
+ (49)
+ (47)
+ (45)
+ (44)
+ (43)
+ (42)
+ (42)
+ (42)
+ (41)
+ (37)
+ (36)
+ (35)
+ (34)
+ (33)
+ (32)
+ (30)
+ (29)
+ (27)
+ (27)
+ (25)
+ (23)
+ (23)
+ (23)
+ (21)
+ (21)
+ (21)
+ (19)
+ (19)
+ (19)
+ (19)
+ (18)
+ (18)
+ (18)
+ (17)
+ (17)
+ (17)
+ (17)
+ (17)
+ (16)
+ (16)
+ (16)
+ (16)
+ (16)
+ (16)
+ (15)
+ (15)


Users that often use this tag:
stbalbach (46)
matteo (46)
Artw (46)
Fizz (39)
fearfulsymmetry (34)
mediareport (22)
Kattullus (20)
mattbucher (15)
Toekneesan (14)
Rustic Etruscan (14)
ocherdraco (13)
shivohum (12)
Horace Rumpole (12)
mathowie (11)
Rumple (11)
carsonb (10)
MiguelCardoso (10)
nickyskye (10)
Joe Beese (10)
kliuless (9)
the man of twists ... (9)
netbros (8)
dobbs (8)
madamjujujive (8)
taz (7)
The Whelk (7)
homunculus (6)
marxchivist (6)
brundlefly (6)
zarq (6)
Xurando (6)
shakespeherian (6)
Iridic (6)
reenum (6)
baylink (5)
drezdn (5)
Blake (5)
amberglow (5)
plep (5)
four panels (5)
kenko (5)
NotMyselfRightNow (5)
blahblahblah (5)
Miko (5)
Gator (5)
dng (5)
mrgrimm (4)
y2karl (4)
Chrysostom (4)
monju_bosatsu (4)
semmi (4)
silusGROK (4)
anastasiav (4)
feelinglistless (4)
johnny novak (4)
crunchland (4)
ed (4)
joeclark (4)
wendell (4)
interrobang (4)

MTV of books

Publishers Weekly: "What MTV did for music videos and record sales, BookReels wants to do for book trailers and book sales." No, but they have collected about 3000 book trailers and interviews. New Yorker: The Awkward Art of Book Trailers: "Then there is the leading book-trailer auteur of our time, Gary Shteyngart." TheRumpus: Fantastic Book Trailers and the Reasons They’re So Good: "There tends to exist a general skepticism toward book trailers."
posted by stbalbach on Jun 11, 2014 - 8 comments

Cats vs dogs

The Internet is cat; books are dog. "We're reading dogs and clicking cats."
posted by stbalbach on Apr 12, 2013 - 7 comments

For eccentric book-lovers with beards and cats

"..it is refreshing to see Jason Merkoski, a leader of the team that built Amazon's first Kindle, dispense with the usual techo-utopianism and say, “I think we’ve made a proverbial pact with the devil in digitizing our words.” [more inside]
posted by stbalbach on Apr 9, 2013 - 90 comments

Random Harper Penguin

The book publishing world is merging into behemoths in order to better negotiate with Amazon. Rupert Murdoch (HarperCollins) has made an offer to buy Penguin for $1.6 billion. This just hours after Penguin said it was in talks to merge with Random House to create a 'Random Penguin' with nearly 25% of all English-language book sales. Either way the reputation of Penguin could soon be in tatters. As one agent said, "Authors have told me they are frightened by a Random House takeover, but terrified by a HarperCollins one."
posted by stbalbach on Oct 29, 2012 - 77 comments

Amazon Election Heat Map 2012

Amazon Election Heat Map 2012. Republican landslide in Amazon book vote.
posted by stbalbach on Aug 22, 2012 - 77 comments

rip lnu

"rip lnu". So ends 13 months of the greatest pirate ebook site the world has ever known. [more inside]
posted by stbalbach on Feb 16, 2012 - 102 comments

The Library of Congress documentary

The Library of Congress (1:30m), a tour documentary by C-SPAN.
posted by stbalbach on Jul 20, 2011 - 8 comments

Borders liquidating remaning stores

Borders is liquidating as soon as this Friday, closing all 399 stores, ending 40 years of business, and 11,000 jobs. Brought down by e-books and Amazon. Scenes From A Borders Liquidation Sale. Map of (soon to be vacant) Borders stores.
posted by stbalbach on Jul 18, 2011 - 311 comments

The Secret Bookstore

The Secret Bookstore [more inside]
posted by stbalbach on Jul 15, 2011 - 25 comments

Internet Archive: One copy of every book ever published, in shipping containers

A common refrain is "a library is not (just) a warehouse of books." Except, when it is. Internet Archive, best known as the worlds largest collection of digital books in the public domain, has started collecting "one [physical] copy of every book ever published" for long-term warehousing in shipping containers.
posted by stbalbach on Jun 6, 2011 - 58 comments

The "flipback", a new kind of book

A new kind of book has been created in Holland, where its sold over 1m copies since it came out in 2009. Now finding its way to England, called the "flipback", the pages are super thin Bible paper with a special lay-flat spine and small format, making it suitable for reading with one hand, thumb page-flips, and shirt pocket storage.
posted by stbalbach on Mar 21, 2011 - 63 comments

Borders bankrupt

Borders filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection this morning, announcing it would close about 200 of its 650 or so remaining stores.
posted by stbalbach on Feb 16, 2011 - 212 comments

Take a stand for permanent paper in books

Take a stand for permanent paper. "Eight years ago we started to notice the shift in buying patterns from free-sheet Permanent Paper to groundwood paper for hardcover books. Groundwood is the type of paper used in newspapers and mass market paperbacks, and its production is such that it is much lower-quality and degrades more quickly than traditional book publishing paper." What makes a book permanent? [more inside]
posted by stbalbach on Jun 1, 2010 - 56 comments

1934: “Good Books That Almost Nobody Has Read”

In early 1934, about a dozen of America's leading writers and critics - William Faulkner, John Dos Passos, Sinclair Lewis, Edmund Wilson, Thorton Wilder, etc. - answered the question: What are some “Good Books That Almost Nobody Has Read”? [Via the always interesting Neglected Books Page]
posted by stbalbach on May 13, 2010 - 24 comments

The Harvard Depository

Harvard University finished in 1986 construction of the Harvard Depository, a mysterious storage facility in a publicly undisclosed location 30 miles from campus where large tracts of land are less expensive than in Cambridge. While the facility was originally intended to store Harvard's least-used volumes, it is now home to 45 percent of Harvard's collections. David Lamberth, chair of the Library Implementation Work Group, calls it a "precise warehouse" for which the term "library" would prove inaccurate.
posted by stbalbach on Apr 2, 2010 - 45 comments

Open Library has a new site

Open Library has a new collaborative open source website that aims to catalog every book ever published. About the project. The vision is one Wiki page for every edition of every work with description details.
posted by stbalbach on Mar 17, 2010 - 14 comments

Steal This Book

"Steal These Books" is a NYT essay about the most commonly shoplifted books from bookstores. tl;dr? #1=The Virgin Suicides. [more inside]
posted by stbalbach on Dec 23, 2009 - 53 comments

Best Books

The Worlds Best Books (1909), One Hundred Best Books (1916), One Thousand Books for a Village Library (1895), The Book Lover, a Guide to the Best Reading (1889), The Choice of Books (1905), A Thousand of the Best Novels (1919), Comfort Found in Good Old Books (1911), A Guide to the Best Historical Novels (1911), A Guide to Historical Fiction (1914), and lots more..
posted by stbalbach on Jul 13, 2008 - 15 comments

Salman Rushdie wins all-time best of Booker Prize

Salman Rushdie is now officially the Booker Prize's best-author. Rushdie's 1981 novel Midnight's Children was named Thursday as the greatest-ever winner of Britain's most prestigious literary award, in celebration of the prizes 40th anniversary. The only other time this award was given, on the 25th anniversary in 1993, Midnight's Children also won.
posted by stbalbach on Jul 10, 2008 - 33 comments

Most books published 1923-63 in public domain

"For U.S. books published between 1923 and 1963, the rights holder needed to submit a form to the U.S. Copyright Office renewing the copyright 28 years after publication. In most cases, books that were never renewed are now in the public domain. Estimates of how many books were renewed vary, but everyone agrees that most books weren't renewed. If true, that means that the majority of U.S. books published between 1923 and 1963 are freely usable." How do you know? The renewal copyright records have traditionally been scattered and hard to access, but Google - with the help of Project Gutenberg and the Distributed Proofreaders painstakingly typed in every word - has just released a single database as a freely downloadable XML file.
posted by stbalbach on Jun 25, 2008 - 54 comments

Books: increasing authorship and decreasing readership

You're an Author? Me too! The trend of increasing authorship and decreasing readership.
posted by stbalbach on Apr 26, 2008 - 61 comments

Bookmarks Magazine: book reviews periodical

Bookmarks Magazine has long been one of my favorite book review periodicals because it aggregates and summarizes reviews from many sources, for example: The Children of Húrin. Recently they have opened up the back-issue archive to non-subscribers. [more inside]
posted by stbalbach on Apr 20, 2008 - 6 comments

I See Dead People's Books

I See Dead People's Books (wiki) is an impromptu project by LibraryThing members to catalog the libraries of famous dead people, from Tupac Shakur to Ernest Hemingway to John Adams. Many more in the works, anyone is able to create a dead library with all the attendant features of LT.
posted by stbalbach on Mar 14, 2008 - 22 comments

Brief books in style

Brief books are in style. "Fine, old-fashioned self-improving middlebrow literature." [more inside]
posted by stbalbach on Mar 1, 2008 - 14 comments

Borders self-publishing and in-store distribution service

Borders and Lulu.com have teamed up to create Border's Lifestyle, a new service allowing anyone to design and publish their own book and have it distributed through Borders stores, even including your own book tour and in-store readings. Is it, according to Ben Vershbow of if:book, "bringing vanity publishing to a whole new level of fantasy role-playing,"1 or a real innovation in book distribution, bypassing the professional gatekeepers? [more inside]
posted by stbalbach on Feb 21, 2008 - 35 comments

Philip M. Parker writes and publishes over 85,000 books on Amazon

Philip M. Parker[1][2] has written and published over 85,000 books on Amazon in the past few years, although by his own count the total published is over 200,000. He is like a writing machine - in fact, he has created a machine that churns out an original book about every 20 minutes. A few sample titles: [more inside]
posted by stbalbach on Feb 8, 2008 - 46 comments

Book Scavenging in Manhatten

Book Scavenging. Hundreds of homeless people eke out a living scavenging books from dumpsters and sidewalk trash in Manhattan. Sidewalk is a book about the subculture of sidewalk book scavengers and vendors.
posted by stbalbach on Jan 20, 2008 - 52 comments

Chicago Center for Literature and Photography

Chicago Center for Literature and Photography has some excellent book and film reviews, written by author and artist Jason Pettus. He mostly reviews contemporary fiction but has a few classics like The House of the Seven Gables, which is part of a two-year project to read 100 "classics" to see if they are really classic or not.
posted by stbalbach on Jan 18, 2008 - 15 comments

Publishing Industry Trends to Watch in 2008

15 Publishing Industry Trends to Watch in 2008
posted by stbalbach on Jan 9, 2008 - 54 comments

Tomb of tomes

An obscure 1911 British law requires a copy of every published book, journal, newspaper, patent, sound recording, magazine etc.. to be permanently archived in at least one of five libraries around the country. The British Library has the most complete collection and is currently adding about 12.5km of new shelf space a year of mostly unheard of and unwanted stuff. A new state-of-the-art warehouse is being constructed with 262 linear kilometers of high-density, fully automated storage in a low-oxygen temperature controlled environment. It is not a library, it is a warehouse for "things that no one wants." BLDG Blog ponders on what it all means.
posted by stbalbach on Dec 4, 2007 - 60 comments

Google Books new features

Google Books has an interesting new feature called "Popular Passages" which shows how many future books have quoted passages from the present book - it's billed as a way to follow literary memes but would be equally helpful in sleuthing for old literary crimes. They've also added "Share and Enjoy" for clipping quotes from public domain books into a blog or notebook.
posted by stbalbach on Sep 6, 2007 - 17 comments

BookTV

BookTV.org is one the smartest shows on television. Scraping free content from author interviews at local bookstores and book fairs, its new re-designed website is long overdue, and now all content stays available in a permanent archive in case you miss the 48hr C-SPAN2 weekend marathons. Sample programs: The Canon: A Whirligig Tour of the Beautiful Basics of Science, In Depth: Ray Kurzweil,"Blackwater: The Rise Of The World's Most Powerful Mercenary Army"
posted by stbalbach on Jul 9, 2007 - 16 comments

Bookstore burns books

It's a sad old story but the reading of literature continues to decline. Prospero's Books - a Kansas-city used bookstore - is so desperate to thin out its collection it has started to burn books. Co-owner Tom Wayne says he is unable to sell many of his thousands of books, or even to give them away to libraries and thrift stores, so he started a pyre in protest.
posted by stbalbach on May 29, 2007 - 66 comments

Public domain books published 1923-1963

Stanford's new Copyright Renewal Database makes searchable the copyright renewal records of books published from 1923-1963, previously very difficult to do. Between those dates, a renewal registration was required to prevent the expiration of copyright, so books not renewed are now in the public domain. Publishing scanned books on Internet Archive.
posted by stbalbach on Apr 6, 2007 - 3 comments

Google Books uncovers old literary crimes

Dead Plagiarists Society. Using Google Books to uncover old (and recent) literary crimes. "Given the popularity of plagiarism-seeking software services for academics, it may be only a matter of time before some enterprising scholar yokes Google Book Search and plagiarism-detection software together into a massive literary dragnet, scooping out hundreds of years' worth of plagiarists—giants and forgotten hacks alike—who have all escaped detection until now."
posted by stbalbach on Dec 24, 2006 - 43 comments

The Iraq Study Group Report experimental annotation project

The Iraq Study Group Report, annotated, an experimental project by The Institute for the Future of the Book.
posted by stbalbach on Dec 21, 2006 - 9 comments

Microsoft Live Book Search

Microsoft releases Microsoft Live Search Books (beta), a third major project to scan public domain books behind Google books and the pioneering Archive.org. Content is pre-1927 editions of public domain works. Live Search blog has (slightly) more info and lots of general reactions pro and con.
posted by stbalbach on Dec 14, 2006 - 9 comments

personal book publishing

Kevin Kelly on the latest in personal book publishing advice.
posted by stbalbach on Dec 8, 2006 - 63 comments

The rise and decline of the book

Conventional wisdom says that new media -- Internet, cable television, satellite radio, videogames -- is competing with books, putting them at long-term risk if not decline. "The conventional wisdom is wrong". Special report from Forbes.
posted by stbalbach on Dec 1, 2006 - 38 comments

The Espresso Book Machine

The Espresso Book Machine. A photocopier-size machine that can print and bind a paperback in a few minutes. This is the first fully-automatic book printer designed for retail locations, it is envisioned to be a kiosk. Current beta tests in DC and New York Public Library, also in talks with the Internet Archive and others to support the growing world of online scanned books. Further out, Kinkos, Starbucks, etc.. could become major book sellers and the practice of overstocking (and discounted books) could be reduced. Machine will probably be about $100,000.
posted by stbalbach on Sep 30, 2006 - 36 comments

The Best Sea Books

101 "Crackerjacks". The best sea books.
posted by stbalbach on Jul 1, 2006 - 17 comments

What is the world reading?

What is the world reading? The UNESCO Index Translationum database has over 1.6 million bibliographical entries of translated works. Interesting stats such as: The worlds Top 50 translated authors. The Top 10 translated Norwegian authors (or other languages). Number of translations for any given book. Some surprising results, lots to explore, and an interesting lesson on what sells.
posted by stbalbach on Jun 21, 2006 - 13 comments

What to read

What to read. A list of lists for book recommendations, includes a compiled "Great Books" Lists with a World Literature list and lots more.
posted by stbalbach on Mar 20, 2006 - 50 comments

"Bush should read this book"

Have you ever thought "Bush should read this book". Anatomy of a meme.
posted by stbalbach on Feb 24, 2006 - 32 comments

50 books that are RAND

50 Books for Thinking About the Future Human Condition, a list by the RAND corporation.
posted by stbalbach on Jan 26, 2006 - 25 comments

How to Read and Digest a Book.

How to Read and Digest a Book.
posted by stbalbach on Feb 25, 2005 - 24 comments

Page: 1