1834 posts tagged with Books.
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You're going to hear some serious @#$%...

Audiobooks for the Damned (main site, previously) have been forging ahead in their quest to audiobook-ify film novelizations, and have finally released one of their holy grails - a seven-hour audiobook of George Gipe's legendarily insane novelization of Back to the Future Part I, as chronicled in Ryan North's B to the F (read it chronologically here, also previously). [more inside]
posted by BiggerJ on Sep 20, 2016 - 23 comments

A tiny vestibule of literary happiness

Build your very own house for books to plant in your front yard, and become your neighbourhood’s Street Librarian.
posted by adept256 on Sep 18, 2016 - 31 comments

Oy with the poodles already!

In anticipation of the November Gilmore Girls revival, and assuming you've completed your preparatory rewatch (FanFare), here's a list of all 339 books referenced by the show so you can find a few to add to your reading list and keep you busy until November, or check it out it in check-off list form to see how you stack up.
posted by Eyebrows McGee on Sep 18, 2016 - 58 comments

“I dream of things that never were,”

W.P. Kinsella, author of ‘Shoeless Joe,’ dead at 81 [Maclean's Magazine] W.P. Kinsella, the B.C.-based author of “Shoeless Joe,” the award-winning novel that became the film “Field of Dreams,” has died at 81. His literary agency confirms the writer had a doctor-assisted death on Friday in Hope, B.C. The agency did not provide details about Kinsella’s health. [more inside]
posted by Fizz on Sep 17, 2016 - 30 comments

“Where is human nature so weak as in the bookstore?”

2016 National Book Awards Longlists: The National Book Award Finalists will be revealed on 10/13 and the Winners announced on 11/16. [more inside]
posted by Fizz on Sep 16, 2016 - 11 comments

First, be smart from the very beginning

The most helpful career advice article ever posted on LinkedIn: "So you think you can fake your own death?" by Elizabeth Greenwood, author of the new book Playing Dead.
posted by Potomac Avenue on Sep 15, 2016 - 36 comments

The attention of readers is not, she says "a boiled egg" but "an omelet.

On Not Reading by Amy Hungerford [The Chronicle Review] “The activity of nonreading is something that scholars rarely discuss. When they — or others whose identities are bound up with books — do so, the discussions tend to have a shamefaced quality. Blame "cultural capital" — the sense of superiority associated with laying claim to books that mark one’s high social status. More entertainingly, blame Humiliation, the delicious game that a diabolical English professor invents in David Lodge’s 1975 academic satire, Changing Places. ”
posted by Fizz on Sep 13, 2016 - 42 comments

they should have sent a poet (of chickens)

Fancy chickens were all the rage in the late 19th century, so Lewis Wright's Illustrated Book of Poultry was a big hit. With hundreds of pages of high density chicken information and dozens of beautiful chromolithographs by ornithological artist J.W. Ludlow, the book stayed in print for more than 40 years. Harvard University just digitized the book for public viewing. Here's their blog post about it. [more inside]
posted by moonmilk on Sep 10, 2016 - 29 comments

“Very often I am writing about writing,” he says.

No, Alan Moore Isn't a Recluse [Publishers Weekly] “Speaking in intimidatingly long and thoughtful sentences, Moore is affable, relaxed, and eager to talk about his new novel, Jerusalem [Amazon], to be published in September by Norton’s Liveright imprint in the U.S. and Knockabout in the U.K. It’s a 600,000-word opus that has been lurking, Cthulhu-like, behind his last decade of work. Remixing the most-reader-challenging tricks of writers such as James Joyce, Roland Barthes, and Mark Z. Danielewski, Jerusalem is an astonishing collection of words and ideas that weaves a hypnotic spell.” [Previously] [Previously] [more inside]
posted by Fizz on Sep 8, 2016 - 33 comments

A serious, well-behaved, young black cat

73 years after her death a new Beatrix Potter story was published [more inside]
posted by Bulgaroktonos on Sep 8, 2016 - 14 comments

Inspired By Baby Island

Ann M. Martin on the Enduring Appeal of The Baby-Sitters Club and Rebooting Another Children’s Series. "It’s hard to overstate the ravenousness with which young girls would devour these $3.99 tomes. At the time, a Baby-sitters Club book was about as close as we could get to a Snapchat-style look into the life of an early-’90s 13-year-old. The books were where a lot of young women first learned what it was like to experience divorce, the death of a grandparent, a first boyfriend, or a lost kitten." [more inside]
posted by ChuraChura on Sep 7, 2016 - 40 comments

“I love writing on the hoof, in notebooks on walks, in trains and cafés”

le Carré on le Carré [The Guardian] The many lives of John le Carré, in his own words. An exclusive extract from his new memoir, The Pigeon Tunnel. Portraits by Nadav Kander. [Previously.] [more inside]
posted by Fizz on Sep 4, 2016 - 24 comments

“You can tell by their finger movements,”

Subway Reads: Free E-Books, Timed for Your Commute [The New York Times] “On Sunday, Subway Reads started delivering novellas, short stories or excerpts from full-length books to passengers’ cellphones or tablets. The idea is for riders to download a short story or a chapter and read it on the train. Subway Reads will even let riders choose what to read based on how long they will be on the subway — a 10-page selection for a 10-minute ride, a 20-page selection for a 20-minute excursion, a 30-page selection for a 30-minute trip. Delays not included.”
posted by Fizz on Aug 31, 2016 - 6 comments

only the lifelong challenge of acknowledging the reality of other people

Nakul Krishna on the ethics & morality of Malory Towers. [more inside]
posted by terretu on Aug 29, 2016 - 22 comments

Una donna americana sta leggendo tutto il catalogo...

New York City's Karen Barbarossa is reading the Biblioteca Adelphi catalogue, in order, from 1965 through now. All of it. That's 653 titles, to date.
posted by adamgreenfield on Aug 25, 2016 - 7 comments

“Fear is a natural response,”

One Third of Parents Avoid Reading Children Scary Stories, Study Finds [The Guardian] “A survey of 1,003 UK parents by online bookseller The Book People found that 33% would steer clear of books for their children containing frightening characters. Asked about the fictional creations they found scariest as children, a fifth of parents cited the Wicked Witch of the West from L Frank Baum’s The Wonderful Wizard of Oz, with the Child Catcher from Ian Fleming’s Chitty-Chitty-Bang-Bang in second place. Third was the Big Bad Wolf, in his grandmother-swallowing Little Red Riding Hood incarnation, fourth the Grand High Witch from Roald Dahl’s The Witches, and fifth Cruella de Vil, from Dodie Smith’s The Hundred and One Dalmatians.”
posted by Fizz on Aug 25, 2016 - 57 comments

Fictitious Feasts

A series of pictures of food as eaten in world famous scenes in literature. Charles Roux creates these fictitious meals, photographs them and then eats them. His goal is to collect the photographs in a book, putting the meals back on paper, where they belong.
posted by Too-Ticky on Aug 20, 2016 - 48 comments

“We said we wouldn’t do that!”

Harry Potter and the Possible Queerbaiting: [The Guardian] JK Rowling’s Cursed Child has drawn fire over its story of male friendship, which some readers feel flirts coyly with gay romance – but it is a change from the usual stereotypes. [more inside]
posted by Fizz on Aug 16, 2016 - 28 comments

“Have you noticed,” she asked, “the clothes thing?”

Clothes aren’t just something one puts on a character to stop her from being naked. Done right, clothes are everything.
posted by betweenthebars on Aug 16, 2016 - 41 comments

The hawk was everything I wanted to be: solitary, self-possessed, free..

President Obama's Summer Reading List [The Guardian] The White House released [whitehouse.gov] Barack Obama’s summer reading list on Friday as the first family vacationed in Martha’s Vineyard. It’s a mix of prize-winning novels and the memoir of a surfer who spent much of his childhood in Hawaii, something the president can appreciate. [Previously.] [more inside]
posted by Fizz on Aug 14, 2016 - 59 comments

“God created war so that Americans would learn geography.”

Of Thee I Read: The United States in Literature [The New York Times] Reporters and editors on the National Desk of The New York Times were asked to suggest books that a visitor ought to read to truly understand the American cities and regions where they live, work and travel. There were no restrictions — novels, memoirs, histories and children’s books were fair game. Here are some selections. Recommend a book that captures something special about where you live in the comments, or on Twitter with the hashtag #natbooks. [more inside]
posted by Fizz on Aug 9, 2016 - 54 comments

As religious missions go, it was a pretty sweet deal

Evliya Çelebi’s Seyahatname is one of history’s greatest travelogues - Edward White, The Paris Review. [via]
posted by Think_Long on Aug 9, 2016 - 4 comments

“Behold the mystery, the mysterious, undeserved beauty of the world.’’

The Misanthropic Genius of Joy Williams [The New York Times] The writer’s new story collection establishes her as one of the greatest chroniclers of humanity’s insignificance. [more inside]
posted by Fizz on Aug 8, 2016 - 10 comments

Ink4ink -- Portland librarians matching tattoos and books

"Steve Roskoski, a library assistant, said he and his fellow librarians (some with their own tattoos) came up with the idea to match readers with books based on their tats. It’s Portland after all. “Book recommending and finding people good reads is something we do every day here at the Multnomah County Library,” Roskoski said. “Social media is a great way to interact with those people - and we’ve seen a great response. We had over 150 awesome tattoos sent in.” That number will continue to grow, Roskoski suspects, as the word gets out." [more inside]
posted by gingerbeer on Aug 1, 2016 - 28 comments

#ManBooker2016

Man Booker Prize Announces 2016 Longlist: The longlist, or ‘Man Booker Dozen’, for the £50,000 Man Booker Prize is announced today. This year’s longlist of 13 books was selected by a panel of five judges: Amanda Foreman (Chair); Jon Day; Abdulrazak Gurnah; David Harsent and Olivia Williams. It was chosen from 155 submissions published in the UK between 1 October 2015 and 30 September 2016. The Man Booker Prize for Fiction, first awarded in 1969, is open to writers of any nationality, writing originally in English and published in the UK. [more inside]
posted by Fizz on Jul 27, 2016 - 11 comments

"Hidden literary gems"

Writing for the BBC, Lucy Scholes lists "Ten 'Lost' Books You Should Read Now," starting with Teffi's Memories: From Moscow to the Black Sea. An excerpt from Memories appeared in The New Yorker in 2014, and a recent article there provided additional background for that book as well as the collection of which the essay "My Dinner with Rasputin" is a part. [more inside]
posted by Wobbuffet on Jul 23, 2016 - 11 comments

“But which is the biggest, dumbest object of them all?”

Big Dumb Objects: Science Fiction's Most Mysterious MacGuffins by Damien Walter [The Guardian] “When the unknown is also alien, the mystery only grows more magnetic. Think of that iconic opening to Stanley Kubrick’s 2001: A Space Odyssey: a family of apes wake one morning to find a black monolith looming over them; that had its origins in Arthur C Clarke’s short story The Sentinel. Did some super-advanced civilisation intercede in the early evolution of intelligent life on earth? Or was the monolith just filming a very special edition of Life on Earth? We don’t know, and never find out. But this shiny, looming thing is just one of many Big Dumb Objects [wiki] that have turned up in science fiction over the decades.”
posted by Fizz on Jul 22, 2016 - 50 comments

“The list doesn’t destroy culture; it creates it.”

Like These Books? Here Are 60+ Things You Might Also Like ... [NPR.org] Welcome to the second installment of Read, Watch, Binge! our summer recommendation series. As you may recall from last month's list [Like These Movies? Here Are 100+ Things You Might Also Like ...], we were tired of algorithms that only matched books to books or movies to movies. So this month, we've enlisted the help of real live humans to pair books with movies, musicals, TV, comics, podcasts and more.
posted by Fizz on Jul 21, 2016 - 8 comments

Crivens! This is good news!!

Nac Mac Feegle! The Wee Free Men! Nae king! Nae quin! Nae laird! Nae master! We willna' be fooled again! The Nac Mac Feegle are coming to Hollywood. Hide your ships!
posted by Deeleybopper on Jul 19, 2016 - 68 comments

reader, i hope he married it.

Tumblr user wintersoldierfell has a whale of a time reviewing Moby Dick.
posted by divabat on Jul 18, 2016 - 98 comments

Clap Clap

seems like folks like us be best
when we broken open
when we melted down
when we easier to digest

On June 26, 2016, author Jason Reynolds accepted two Coretta Scott King author honors for his YA novels All American Boys (co-authored with Brendan Kiely) and The Boy in the Black Suit. For his second acceptance speech, he delivered a call to action poem: Machetes (full text of poem at link). Video. [more inside]
posted by sunset in snow country on Jul 18, 2016 - 4 comments

No porn category exists in their honor. Yet.

Do you find bookish people sexy? You may be sapiosexual. [more inside]
posted by Johnny Wallflower on Jul 10, 2016 - 117 comments

Illustrated Travel Books of the Edwardian Era

In "An Edwardian Package Holiday," Kirsty Hooper mentions the role that "lively representations" in illustrated travel books such as Spain Revisited: A Summer Holiday in Galicia and A Corner of Spain played in promoting northwest Spain to British tourists (more here). Many other richly illustrated travel books from the same period are available online, perhaps most notably the "Beautiful England" and "Beautiful Ireland" series published by Blackie & Son and the wide variety of titles published by A & C Black. [more inside]
posted by Wobbuffet on Jul 9, 2016 - 8 comments

book covers tell women what they want by surmising who they want to be

The Subtle Genius of Elena Ferrante’s Bad Book Covers by Emily Harnett [The Atlantic] With their sandy beaches and windswept women, the U.S. editions of Elena Ferrante’s novels look familiar even if you’ve never seen them. That’s because they look like virtually every other book authored by a woman these days—not to mention like bridal magazines, beach-resort brochures, and even “Viagra ads.” On Twitter and beyond, readers have described Ferrante’s covers as “horrible,” “atrocious,” “utterly hideous,” and as a “disservice” to her novels. At Slate, one commenter approvingly mentions a local bookstore’s decision to display one of Ferrante’s books in plain brown paper, reviving a practice used for Playboy and the infamous issue of Vanity Fair with a pregnant Demi Moore on the cover. The implication, of course, isn’t that Ferrante’s covers are obscene in the traditional sense—just obscenely bad. Previously.
posted by Fizz on Jul 9, 2016 - 46 comments

“please enjoy the burnt crust of my epic summer reads...”

A Summer Reading List for Wretched Assholes Who Prefer to Wallow in Someone Else’s Misery by Claire Cameron [The Millions] “By some secret law of lists, “summer reads” often settle on books that are light and fluffy and happy. Like a marshmallow, they are usually too sticky and sweet for my taste. What about a list for us wretched assholes who prefer to spend the summer wallowing in a someone’s else’s misery? On holiday, I cut myself off from my regular writing regime to focus on the people I’m with — I understand this is called “relaxing.” As my real life is relatively drama free, this means I have dangerous spare capacity to obsess over…what? While a happy book might distract me temporarily, it’s far easier to become completely consumed by an epic novel full of anguish.” [more inside]
posted by Fizz on Jun 29, 2016 - 25 comments

My Apartment: George Lois

Video tour of legendary designer George Lois's Greenwich Village apartment. Also in the series so far: Florence Welch, Glenn O'Brien, others.
posted by Bron on Jun 28, 2016 - 5 comments

Who is this guy anyway, some sort of dog hat expert??

An Open Letter to the Female Hat-Wearing Dog From “Go Dog, Go”
posted by Artw on Jun 15, 2016 - 129 comments

The Sputnik Awards

The Sputnik Awards are a new prize for speculative fiction. The voting system is not like the other awards. [more inside]
posted by scissorfish on Jun 7, 2016 - 15 comments

“equally efficient in the visualisation of hidden medieval inks,”

X-Rays Reveal 1,300-Year-Old Writings Inside Later Bookbindings [The Guardian] The words of the 8th-century Saint Bede are among those that have been found by detecting iron, copper and zinc – constituents of medieval ink. Medieval manuscripts that have been hidden from view for centuries could reveal their secrets for the first time, thanks to new technology. Dutch scientists and other academics are using an x-ray technique to read fragments of manuscripts that have been reused as bookbindings and which cannot be deciphered with the naked eye. After the middle ages manuscripts were recycled, with pages pasted inside bindings to strengthen them. Those fragments may be the unique remains of certain works.
posted by Fizz on Jun 5, 2016 - 13 comments

“She’s creating it, and whatever she creates becomes part of the story.”

J. K. Rowling Just Can’t Let Harry Potter Go [The New York Times] J. K. Rowling always said that the seventh Harry Potter book, “Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows,” would be the last in the series, and so far she has kept to her word. But though she’s written many new things in the intervening nine years, including four adult novels, she’s never been able to put Harry to rest, or to leave him alone. [more inside]
posted by Fizz on Jun 1, 2016 - 125 comments

Morph Club

The Morph Club Podcast - Two comix illustrator friends revisit Katherine Applegate's popular 1990's YA book series Animorphs! Join them as they laugh and cry about sad morphing teens and the horrible aliens who hate them. [more inside]
posted by One Second Before Awakening on May 31, 2016 - 12 comments

A bookstore filled with mirrors

In Hangzhou, China, a new bookstore designed by XL-Muse contains mirrored ceilings as well unique designs around mirrors that provide amazing illusions, as well as a very unique "book playground".
posted by numaner on May 31, 2016 - 11 comments

Yo mama's so vast, she contains multitudes

25 Literary Yo Mama Jokes
posted by Daily Alice on May 30, 2016 - 36 comments

“...not more communism but more public-spirited pigs.””

TS Eliot's rejection of Orwell's Animal Farm [The Guardian] Digitised for the first time by the British Library, Eliot’s rejection is now available to read alongside others including Virginia Woolf’s to James Joyce. Eliot’s letter is one of more than 300 items which have been digitised by the British Library, a mixture of drafts, diaries, letters and notebooks by authors ranging from Virginia Woolf to Angela Carter and Ted Hughes. The literary archive reveals that Orwell was not the only major writer to suffer a series of rejections: the British Library has also digitised a host of rejections for James Joyce’s A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man, showing how his patron Harriet Shaw Weaver attempted to find a printer for the novel she had published in serialised form in The Egoist. [more inside]
posted by Fizz on May 30, 2016 - 19 comments

“...they’re really into capitalism.”

Don’t Know What To Read? Let Goldman Sachs Tell You. [Melville House] "Goldman Sachs: financial giant, hotbed of enthusiasm for subprime mortgages, and hapless recipient of your hard-earned money. Who better to tell you what to read? Well, now they are telling you what to read, in the form of a recently-published recommended book list [PDF]. We’re talking about people who incurred $550 million in fines for schemes to turn a profit on the civilization-threatening financial crisis they themselves had helped create, and the line between genius and chutzpah is notoriously hard to draw, so, yeah, I’d like to know what’s on these folks’ bedside tables."
posted by Fizz on May 28, 2016 - 50 comments

Treasure Hunt

“I still think you could do something that no one has ever done before.” - the story of Kit Williams and Masquerade, a children's book of illustrations that also served as clue to the location of a golden hare, and, despite an ignoble end to the competition, kicked off a crazy off treasure hunting books and videogames in 1980s Britain.
posted by Artw on May 27, 2016 - 22 comments

Still alive: Judy Blume opens a book store

At 78 years of age, legendary author Judy Blume has made an interesting career choice - in February she opened a book store in Key West, FL. [more inside]
posted by kimberussell on May 24, 2016 - 17 comments

City Readers

The New York Society Library maintains an elegant online database of its circulation records from 1789 to 1805, a period that includes its stint as the first library of the United States Congress. To help you get a handle on the data trove (assembled from 100,000 records tracking every book that every patron checked out), the Library offers visualization tools and two curated lists of interesting readers: 57 representative women and 40 Founding Fathers.
posted by Iridic on May 23, 2016 - 10 comments

“I’m drawn to writing about times and places on the cusp of transition,”

An Interview with Guy Gavriel Kay [io9] Guy Gavriel Kay has carved out a unique niche, writing fantasy novels that take real-life historical settings and transforming them into something new and different. His latest novel, Children of Earth and Sky, takes place in a version of 16th century Europe that’s under threat from a version of the Ottoman Empire, and includes a fictionalized version of real-life Croatian bandits called the Uskoks, who stole from the Venetians and the Ottomans for justice. We talked to Kay about just how he manages to turn real-life history into a world all his own. You can read an excerpt of Children of Earth and Sky, introducing the character of Danica, here. [more inside]
posted by Fizz on May 10, 2016 - 35 comments

Evidently Mom has the hots for weirdo weatherman

Mom is Dating Weird Wayne From the wonderful Awful Library Books blog (previously) comes this book by Mary Jane Auch, perhaps most famous for the "I Was a Third Grade ... " series of books [more inside]
posted by maxsparber on May 6, 2016 - 13 comments

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