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He's on the menu on the table, he's the knife and he's the waiter

"His work is rooted in the power of collaboration within systems: instructions, rules, and self-imposed limits. His methods are a rebuke to the assumption that a project can be powered by one person’s intent, or that intent is even worth worrying about. To this end, Eno has come up with words like “scenius,” which describes the power generated by a group of artists who gather in one place at one time. (“Genius is individual, scenius is communal,” Eno told the Guardian, in 2010.) It suggests that the quality of works produced in a certain time and place is more indebted to the friction between the people on hand than to the work of any single artist." The New Yorker's Sasha Frere-Jones on Brian Eno's career and new album High Life.
posted by porn in the woods on Jun 30, 2014 - 10 comments

I, I wish you could swim / Like the dolphins, like dolphins can swim

I, I will be king
And you, you will be queen
Though nothing will drive them away
We can beat them, just for one day
We can be heroes, just for one day
posted by Going To Maine on Apr 2, 2014 - 51 comments

Scratch my back, and I'll scratch yours.

Back at the beginning of 2010, Peter Gabriel released Scratch My Back, an album of covers of various artists. He had hoped those same artists would, in turn, cover songs he had written. Well, it didn't all come together as smoothly as he had planned, and not all the artists participated, but he's finally released And I'll Scratch Yours. NPR has a limited time preview of both albums running right now. [more inside]
posted by hippybear on Dec 29, 2013 - 42 comments

"Music"

This poster has written this Metafilter post of music specially to introduce you to the instruments of the orchestra. There are four teams of players; the STRINGS, the WOODWIND, the BRASS, and the PERCUSSION. Each of these four teams uses instruments which have a family likeness. They make roughly the same kind of sound in the same way. The STRINGS are played with a bow or plucked by the fingers. The WOODWIND are blown by the breath. The BRASS are blown too. The PERCUSSION are banged. Now we have taken the whole Orchestra to pieces. We have no intention of putting it together again. [more inside]
posted by ocherdraco on Dec 6, 2013 - 3 comments

80 years of electronic music, heard in a selection of 55 tracks by Bleep

A bit over a year ago, Warp Record's digital music shop, Bleep.com, presented their guide to recorded* electronic music, spanning from 1930 to 2010 (also as a Facebook timeline, which apparently kicked the whole thing off). The overview of recorded electronic music was presented as a selection of 55 tracks, almost five and a half hours in full. Part of this presentation was a (now expired) promotional deal to purchase the collection of songs as a lot, but you can still read about each piece of music on Bleep and hear 49 of the tracks in a playlist on Grooveshark. There's more to hear and read below the fold. [more inside]
posted by filthy light thief on Aug 31, 2013 - 26 comments

Music for stuff

Music for Airports, Music for Real Airports. [more inside]
posted by Going To Maine on Aug 9, 2013 - 60 comments

THE END IS EXTREMELY FUCKING NIGH

It's debatable whether the troubled World War Z signals the end of the ongoing zombie craze, but the film that started it all is much more clear: Danny Boyle's bleak, artful cult horror-drama 28 Days Later, which saw its US premiere ten years ago this weekend. From its iconic opening shots of an eerily abandoned London (set to Godspeed You! Black Emperor's brooding post-rock epic "East Hastings") to the frenzied chaos of its climax, Boyle's film -- a dark yet humanist tale of a world eviscerated by a frighteningly contagious epidemic of murderous rage -- reinvented and reinvigorated the genre that Romero built (though many insist its rabid, sprinting berserkers don't really count). And while sequel 28 Weeks Later with its heavyhanded Iraq War allusions failed to live up to the original (despite boasting one of the most viscerally terrifying opening sequences in modern horror), and 28 Months looks increasingly unlikely, there remains a small universe of side content from the film, including music, short films, comics, and inspired-by games. [more inside]
posted by Rhaomi on Jun 28, 2013 - 90 comments

You have to find out how you can fuck up new technologies.

Tackling everything from Abba to the Velvet Underground, Brian Eno reveals his insights into popular music in this 81 minute talk at a music academy sponsored by a popular sugar-and-caffeine-infused drink. [more inside]
posted by item on May 10, 2013 - 25 comments

Jazz that nobody asked for, an animated short film

Sometimes you want to be somber, or serious, or just enjoy some peace and quiet. And in some of those instances, you get jazz that nobody asked for. Jazz that just won't die. [more inside]
posted by filthy light thief on Mar 11, 2013 - 9 comments

Obscure Records at Ubuweb

Obscure Records was a U.K. record label which existed from 1975 to 1978. It was created and run by Brian Eno, who also produced the albums (credited as executive producer in one instance). Ten albums were issued in the series. All ten are available for your listening pleasure at Ubuweb.
posted by flapjax at midnite on Jul 13, 2012 - 30 comments

This post is just in time for the annual spaghetti harvest.

In the late 1970s the UK's Anglia Television ran a respected weekly documentary series: Science Report. But when the show was cancelled in 1977, the producers decided to channel Orson Welles in their final episode. The result was Alternative 3. Over the course of the hour, the audience would learn that a Science Report investigation into the UK "brain drain" had uncovered shocking revelations: man-made pollution had resulted in catastrophic climate change, the Earth would soon be rendered uninhabitable, and a secret American / Soviet joint plan was in place to establish colonies on the Moon and Mars. The show ended with footage of a US/Soviet Mars landing from May 22, 1962. After Alternative 3 aired, thousands of panicked viewers phoned the production company and demanded to know how long they had left to change planets. [more inside]
posted by zarq on Jun 20, 2012 - 22 comments

My Life in the Bush Of Ghosts - Pre-release Version

[This] "is a pre release version of david byrnes first solo album, which was given me by david, when i stayed at his place in alfabet city, in 1981 [...] anyway, the final release differed a lot from this tape, because he used quotes from the quoran in this version, which he had to replace later. i dont know if this version was ever released in any way, shape or form." My Life in the Bush Of Ghosts, David Byrne and Brian Eno
posted by xod on Jun 12, 2012 - 93 comments

"...I want to make a kind of music that had the Long Now and the Big Here..."

Imaginary Landscapes (1989): a visually hypnotic and impressionistic portrait of musician Brian Eno, directed by Duncan Ward and Gabriella Cardazzo. (40 mins.)
posted by Neilopolis on Apr 22, 2012 - 20 comments

Technology is the name we give to things that don’t work yet

Brian Eno on technology and music.
posted by Sebmojo on Nov 7, 2011 - 36 comments

"Another Green World" - Brian Eno BBC documentary

Earlier this year, the BBC's Arena produced and aired an excellent documentary on Brian Eno entitled "Another Green World" containing "a series of conversations on science, art, systems analysis, producing and cybernetics". [more inside]
posted by item on Dec 26, 2010 - 20 comments

A Brief History of Mathematics

A Brief History of Mathematics is a BBC series of ten fifteen-minute podcasts by Professor Marcus du Sautoy about the history of mathematics from Newton and Leibniz to Nicolas Bourbaki, the pseudonym of a group of French 20th Century mathematicians. Among those covered by Professor du Sautoy are Euler, Fourier and Poincaré. The podcasts also include short interviews with people such as Brian Eno and Roger Penrose.
posted by Kattullus on Dec 1, 2010 - 11 comments

Brian Eno: The Dick Flash Interview (SLYT)

You love playing with what somebody else is playing as much as you like playing with yourself. Dick Flash from Pork Magazine interviews Brian Eno about music, copyright and the collaborative process. (SLYT) Previous Eno
posted by bunglin jones on Nov 4, 2010 - 45 comments

Make Music Anywhere

Pocket music apps are letting composers and artists create music anywhere - and they're developing fast. [more inside]
posted by Stark on Aug 11, 2010 - 51 comments

``Diabolus in musica''

Who's the man behind the sounds you hear, every time you startup and use your Mac? Jim Reekes (via)
posted by Blazecock Pileon on Feb 26, 2010 - 27 comments

"I thought it would be interesting to write music for public spaces..." - Brian Eno

Music For Real Airports is a multimedia art project collaboration between interactive artists Human and musicians The Black Dog. With the project set to launch April 24, 2010 at the Sensoria festival of music and film, the project recalls Brian Eno's 1978 work, Ambient 1: Music for Airports. [more inside]
posted by Unicorn on the cob on Feb 16, 2010 - 19 comments

Ambient

On gospel, Abba and the death of the record: an audience with Brian Eno
posted by Artw on Jan 17, 2010 - 134 comments

The sonic experiences of Low Light Mixes

Dave of Low Light Mixes spins together all manner of textural musical goodness into solid, themed sonic experiences. Component parts include but are not limited to ambient, jazz, "jazz", noise, field recordings and one hell of a lot of Brian Eno.
posted by colinmarshall on Mar 18, 2009 - 2 comments

Acute Mystery

Fact: In 1975, musician, producer, and all-around interesting guy Brian Eno (previously, pre-previously) co-created (with Peter Schmidt) the Oblique Strategies cards.
Fact: In August 2008, Oblique_Chirps appeared via Twitter, providing Oblique Strategies-like aphorisms hourly. (via)
Fact: Brian Eno has his own Twitter feed, featuring similarly cryptic updates (as well as differently cryptic updates and the odd political aside), dating back to Oct. 2008.
Fact: Some of the entries are seemingly identical (down to the odd space inserted in the word "straight").
Mystery: Is Eno aware of/involved with the Chirps feed?
posted by yiftach on Jan 14, 2009 - 30 comments

Ambient

Brian Eno brings generative music to the iPhone.
posted by Artw on Oct 15, 2008 - 39 comments

Brian Eno: A Sandbox In Alphaville

Lester Bangs on Brian Eno [more inside]
posted by GalaxieFiveHundred on Dec 6, 2007 - 32 comments

Eno-a-go-go

Brian Eno’s 77 Million Paintings video installation has been shown in Venice, Milan and (last week) San Francisco, but you can have the experience right in your own living room with his new(ish) DVD or on Second Life. “The painting is generated from handmade slides that are randomly combined by the computer…. The selection of elements and their duration in the piece are arbitrarily chosen, forming a virtually infinite number of variations… Millions of Brian Eno originals will be created and then disappear only to be replaced by millions more.” (Eno's generative programming has been previously mentioned in this space.)
posted by GrammarMoses on Jul 5, 2007 - 16 comments

Very Slowly

"To play this motif 840 times in succession, it would be advisable to prepare oneself beforehand, in the deepest silence, by serious immobilities." Erik Satie's Vexations (previously) was more-or-less disregarded as an unperformable thought experiment, until John Cage staged an eighteen-hour performance in 1963. The event cemented Satie's importance in avant-garde music and his influence on a generation of artists. In 2006, several musicians and artists performed their own renditions.
posted by roll truck roll on Dec 30, 2006 - 17 comments

Who's Gonna Love You When Your Looks Are Gone?

Brian Eno is the godfather of electronica, the inventor of ambient music, and producer of the best work by bands like the Talking Heads and U2. Tchad Blake has helmed the mixing board for Elvis Costello, Tom Waits, Soul Coughing and the Bad Plus, to name just a few. Paul Simon is one of the most recognized names in pop music both for his work with Art Garfunkel and for his fusion of American pop music with African and South American music. Surprise is the the album they collaborated on, the new Paul Simon record featuring Eno's signature sonic landscapes all over it, and the entire lovely thing, complete with liner notes, is available to listen to on Simon's website.
posted by eustacescrubb on May 9, 2006 - 69 comments

My Life in the Bush of Ghosts released with CC license.

Brian Eno and David Byrne released My Life in the Bush of Ghosts in 1981. It's a great album--and now it's available with a Creative Commons License. "This is the first time complete and total access to original tracks with remix and sampling possibilities have been officially offered on line."
posted by dobbs on Mar 30, 2006 - 44 comments

Here Comes The Warm Gist

Brian Eno has a new vocal album coming out soon on Ryodisk. He's also been busy agitating for the Liberal Democrats in the recent UK elections, planning an upcoming collaboration with Paul Simon, and chatting amiably with a comic warlock.
posted by yakcat01 on May 11, 2005 - 15 comments

The Portsmouth Sinfonia to return?

The Portsmouth Sinfonia to return? In 1974, Gavin Bryars rounded up a group of novices and enthusiastic amateurs, called them the Portsmouth Sinfonia and let them loose in a recording studio. The result: some of the most disturbing classical music ever committed to tape. Intrigued by the concept, the legendary Brian Eno signed up and played clarinet for the orchestra, adding a certain star cachet to the cacophony. On the back of sympathetic TV coverage, there followed a now-legendary concert at London's Royal Albert Hall. Thirty years later, there are plans to release Portsmouth Sinfonia's output on compact disc by way of celebration. A brazen attempt for quck laughs and publicity, a serious exploration of entropy in the musical medium, or simply an early entry in the torture tape experiment?
posted by scaryduck on Jan 11, 2005 - 36 comments

The passage of time is flicking dimly up on the screen

An entertaining talk on long term thinking, by Brian Eno.
posted by Blue Stone on Jun 20, 2004 - 9 comments

European Viewpoint

From a European Perspective

"President Bush recently declared that the U.S. was "the single surviving model of human progress." Maybe some Americans think this self-evident, but the rest of us see it as a clumsy arrogance born of ignorance. "

Is this something many Americans need to hear but don't want to listen? Personally I appreciated Mr. Eno's honest and candid observations. And no, I don't think he hates America.
posted by nofundy on Jan 23, 2003 - 98 comments

Eno on the Beach

A simple, absolutely perfect short comic about musician/artist/music producer Brian Eno (by cartoonist Tom Hart). If this puts you in the mood, why not draw wisdom from one of Eno's (and artist Paul Schmidt's) Oblique Strategies. Click (or refresh if clicking doesn't work) for a new aphorism, like shuffling a Tarot deck and drawing a new card. "Honour thy error as a hidden intention" is one of my favorites. (More inside for anyone still interested.)
posted by Shane on Dec 6, 2002 - 12 comments

The 5th Annual Edge.org Question

The 5th Annual Edge.org Question is: What is your question? Read answers from Brian Greene, Brian Eno, Richard Dawkins, Steven Pinker, Howard Gardner, Daniel Dennett, and, yes, Alan Alda (and many others).
posted by mattpfeff on Jan 18, 2002 - 13 comments

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