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14 posts tagged with Calypso.
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Everybody’s in the minstrel show

“Oh,” says the ad man. He’s responsible for the hour of primetime television Revlon has bought and turned over to Belafonte, who, by the way, will not be singing “The Banana Boat Song,” and has also decided that he won’t accept commercials. “Oh my god,” says the ad man. Belafonte grins now, and says what he thought then: “Swallow that sh*t, motherf***er.” The Revolutionary Life of Harry Belafonte.
posted by Potomac Avenue on Oct 4, 2013 - 36 comments

"If I told you the words, you wouldn't believe them anyway." -- R. Berry

Louie Louie is a song with a curious history. Inspired by (and/or partially copied from) El Loco Cha Cha by Rene Touzet and Havana Moon by Chuck Berry (YouTube), the original song by Richard Berry and The Pharaohs (YT) is a mix of calypso, cha-cha, and rhythm & blues. The next version was by Rockin' Robin Roberts & The Wailers (YT), which added a certain rock and roll swagger that will sound more familiar to most folks. But the vocals are all wrong, as they're too sharp, too easy to understand. The Kingsmen made the version everyone was talking about, with concerns of obscene lyrics getting the FBI involved (choice excerpts on The Smoking Gun). [more inside]
posted by filthy light thief on Jul 30, 2013 - 50 comments

A taster of the Tropical Discotheque vibe

The original discotheque DJs of the 70s weren’t restricted by genre – they mixed up soul, funk, rock and experimental music to create the nascent disco sound. The Sofrito sound starts from the same point but draws from the tropics - combining bassline soukous, cosmic highlife, stripped-down drum edits, raw carnival rhythms, Manding vibes, scratchy calypso and modern productions that continue in the grand tradition of the discotheque, from Abidjan to Detroit via London, Paris and beyond...
posted by Tom-B on May 13, 2013 - 11 comments

“Music exists in nature to make you smarter."

Bob Brozman, the undisputed master of the National Resonator Guitar, has passed away at age 59. Ethnomusicologist, virtuoso fingerpicker, musical historian, and anarchist philosopher Bob Brozman fell in love with National’s metal body resonator guitars as a teenager and made them his life’s passion. [more inside]
posted by zaelic on Apr 26, 2013 - 34 comments

The Caged Bird Sang

In 1957, famed studio guitarist Tommy Tedesco, along with percussionist Al Bello, recorded Miss Calypso, featuring a young singer named Maya Angelou. [more inside]
posted by timsteil on Apr 4, 2013 - 8 comments

Drink the coconut water I cannot get in America

A little known gem of americana, Calypso is Like so....., was recorded by actor Robert Mitchum in 1957. The record was inspired by Mitchum's meeting Mighty Sparrow and Lord Invader while filming in Tobago. Wonderfully catchy, and amusingly anachronistic, the album contains such gems as Jean and Dinah, I Learn A Merengue, Mama Look at Boo boo, and From a Logical Point of View".
posted by sp160n on Aug 5, 2012 - 11 comments

Workin' for the Yankee dollah...

'Rum and Coca Cola' is a 1942 calypso song by Lord Invader about women on Trinidad prostituting themselves to American soldiers. In 1944, the song was performed in the US by the Andrews Sisters, with the verses altered but the underlying meaning of the song still intact; the song was banned from radio play, however, because of the reference to alcohol. Both versions of the song were enormously popular, and the ensuing plagiarism suits ran until 1950. The copious Rum and Coca Cola Reader has the full story, and over twenty versions of the song. [more inside]
posted by kaibutsu on Nov 1, 2011 - 45 comments

Happy Birthday, Mon Capitaine

Today is the 100th birthday of Jacques Cousteau Jacques-Yves Cousteau, inventor of the aqualung, noted conservationist, filmmaker and television documentarian, was born in Saint-André-de-Cubzac, France in 1910. He died at the age of 87 in 1997. [more inside]
posted by briank on Jun 10, 2010 - 17 comments

Wind it up, wine up, wine up, jump up.

Carnival is home again.
The small Caribbean island of Trinidad has one of world's most lively Carnivals. An historical overview and explanation.
Lets start with the mas(querade); and Peter "see the music, hear the dance" Minshall without doubt the greatest ever carnival costume designer.
The music's inside. [more inside]
posted by adamvasco on Feb 7, 2009 - 6 comments

World Passport Music Downloads

World Passport Music – 75 hours of free world music in mp3/podcast format. Afrobeat, Cuban Diaspora, Haitian Kompa, Salsa, Highlife, Rumba Congolaise, Kinshasa-Nairobi Sounds, Afrijazz, Calypso, Hawaiian, American Jazz Roots, Yoruban Ejeki Jo... Let’s Dance!
posted by algreer on Nov 1, 2007 - 23 comments

322 pages, 1603 label scans, 954 details, 111 sleeves

Jamaican Label Art. J.L.A. is a website for those people who are obsessed with Caribbean music and the artwork and design of the labels on the vinyl reproductions of that music. It doesn't matter if those labels are on recordings of Jamaican music released in the U.S.A., or indeed Trini Calypso released in the U.K. It's all the same to us!
posted by soundofsuburbia on Feb 8, 2007 - 5 comments

Nihongo Bongo!

Nihongo Bongo! - Latin music by Japanese artists from the 40s, 50s and 60s. "Mambo, rumba, cha cha cha, bossa nova, calypso, you name it... it was big in Japan. The exodus of Japanese migrants to Brazil ensured a lasting connection with South American culture as many Japanese artists toured Brazil."
posted by carter on Oct 9, 2006 - 14 comments

Louis Farrakhan, charmer

Sure, Louis Farrakhan talks about UFOs. And, yes, some people think he had a hand in the death of Malcolm X. And maybe a case can be made that he isn't the most tolerant of men. Be that as it may, he was a suburb calypso singer.
posted by Astro Zombie on Sep 7, 2006 - 22 comments

The South Bronx: A Legacy in Song

Music from Morrisania: Dr. Mark Naison, urban historian at Fordham University and principal investigator of the Bronx African-American history project, leads a musical tour of one South Bronx neighborhood from the 1950s to the present, describing how hot summers, open windows and a fertile mixing of ethnic groups influenced landmarks in American musical history -- from Tito Puente to "Watermelon Man" to KRS-One.
posted by Miko on May 18, 2006 - 8 comments

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