1130 posts tagged with China.
Displaying 1 through 50 of 1130. Subscribe:

Feeding A Billion People

Turpan Yuanyang Xiapu (SLYT) [more inside]
posted by Michele in California on May 22, 2016 - 4 comments

My chow mein beats your chop suey anyday

Chandrima S. Bhattacharya traces the journey of the ubiquitous Calcutta chowmin [more inside]
posted by infini on May 18, 2016 - 10 comments

"History shows us that minorities do not count until they are counted."

What is it like to be queer in China? UNDP has just launched Being LGBTI in China – A National Survey on Social Attitudes towards Sexual Orientation, Gender Identity and Gender Expression. With 30,000 respondents, the survey is the largest to date on the topic in China. [more inside]
posted by showbiz_liz on May 18, 2016 - 2 comments

The best basket in China

A brave woman valiantly attempts to prevent panda bears from climbing into a basket of leaves while she rakes.
posted by ChuraChura on May 18, 2016 - 57 comments

(Hip) Hop Gun

A fast-paced new Chinese recruiting video for the People’s Liberation Army “lures recruits with rap music.” The Marine Corps Times calls it “insane,” saying, “U.S. military recruiters take note: It's time to up your game.” [more inside]
posted by LeLiLo on May 9, 2016 - 49 comments

A People's History of the Cultural Revolution, 1962–1976

A New Look At China's Cultural Revolution - "Historian Frank Dikötter says newly opened archives offer fresh details about the chaos China experienced in the 1960s, when Chairman Mao urged students to take to the streets." [more inside]
posted by kliuless on May 9, 2016 - 18 comments

Embroidery on Youtube

Embroider a Guanyin with the hair of the descendant of Rinpoches. Embroider with hooks and gold in India. Embroider with the techniques of European (late) renaissance and modern embroidery. Embroider (...eventually) a kimono. Embroider with horsetail. Embroider with designer Yohji Yamamoto. Embroider like a Ukrainian.
posted by flibbertigibbet on May 2, 2016 - 5 comments

The Great Firewall of China has blocked The Economist

After leading with a cover story criticizing Xi Jinping (otoh) The Economist has been censored in China; Time too and now Medium. [more inside]
posted by kliuless on Apr 20, 2016 - 24 comments

Six bulldozers enter....

A legitimate royal rumble between heavy machinery: construction workers were from two competing companies allegedly get mad... and get even.
posted by Mezentian on Apr 19, 2016 - 20 comments

Why Revolutionaries Love Spicy Food

The shrewd peasant organizer had a mean, even “spiteful” streak. “For example, for a long time I could not accustom myself to the strongly spiced food, such as hot fried peppers, which is traditional to southern China, especially in Hunan, Mao’s birthplace.” The Soviet agent’s tender taste buds invited Mao’s mockery. “The food of the true revolutionary is the red pepper,” declared Mao. “And he who cannot endure red peppers is also unable to fight.’ ” How the chili pepper got to China by Andrew Leonard
posted by chavenet on Apr 18, 2016 - 8 comments

Ginger Baker had one.

Inside Erik Prince’s Treacherous Drive to Build a Private Air Force
Jeremy Scahill continues keeping tabs on Mr Blackwater; Xe; Reflex Responses Erik Prince now Chairman of the Chinese Fsgroup set to loot Africa.
(Previous)
posted by adamvasco on Apr 12, 2016 - 42 comments

Buried Ideas

‘For over two millennia,’ Ian Johnson writes, ‘all our knowledge of China’s great philosophical schools was limited to texts revised after the Qin unification.’ Now a trove of recently discovered ancient documents, written on strips of bamboo, ‘is helping to reshape our understanding of China’s contentious past.’ [more inside]
posted by schneckinlittle on Apr 11, 2016 - 13 comments

Golden Mountain Dim Sum

How U.S. Immigration Law Fueled A Chinese Restaurant Boom
posted by infini on Feb 28, 2016 - 11 comments

by Joseph E. Stiglitz

China Has Overtaken the U.S. as the World’s Largest Economy
posted by infini on Feb 21, 2016 - 45 comments

"This is the sound of China’s young and restless."

A mixtape featuring 20 young independent bands from China, curated by Wooozy, one of the country's leading indie music blogs. "From sunny Guangzhou and cyberpunk Chongqing to the frigid northeast grasslands beyond Beijing. From shoegaze to riot-weird." It can also be downloaded in full here.
posted by beijingbrown on Feb 13, 2016 - 16 comments

Your Friday touch of Zen

With the highly-anticipated release of two King Hu masterpieces on home video by the Masters of Cinema organization, as well as the critical success of Hou Hsiao-hsien’s The Assassin last year, it seems like the wuxia film is making some inroads into the Western critical consciousness. So I thought I’d put together a guide to some of the essential films of the genre. - 30 Essential Wuxia Films
posted by Artw on Feb 12, 2016 - 32 comments

"There’s white and then there’s the how-white-my-shirts-can-be white..."

Stealing White: How a corporate spy swiped plans for DuPont’s billion-dollar color formula By Del Quentin Wilber [Bloomberg Business]
“At first, you’re like: Why are they stealing the color white? I had to Google it to figure out what titanium dioxide even was,” says Dean Chappell, acting section chief of counterespionage for the FBI. “Then you realize there is a strategy to it.” You can’t even call it spying, adds John Carlin, the assistant attorney general in charge of the U.S. Department of Justice’s national security division. “This is theft. And this—stealing the color white—is a very good example of the problem. It’s not a national security secret. It’s about stealing something you can make a buck off of. It’s part of a strategy to profit off what American ingenuity creates.”
posted by Fizz on Feb 5, 2016 - 58 comments

Chang'e 3 moon shots

The China National Space Administration released all of the images from their Chang'e 3 moon landing mission (previously), including hundreds of amazing true color, HD photographs. Some 35 GB of datasets, including photographs of and by the Yutu rover have been difficult to retrieve outside of China and have been mirrored by Emily Lakdawalla at planetary.org.
posted by a lungful of dragon on Feb 1, 2016 - 27 comments

Worst. Tablecloth. Pulling. Gig. Ever.

They misunderstood my ability to be a dick, when correctly inspired. Juggler and comedian Mat Ricardo describes a nightmare gig in Beijing, starting with a (supposed) world record attempt and ending with a mad dash for the airport.
posted by gottabefunky on Jan 19, 2016 - 60 comments

The Case of the Missing Hong Kong Booksellers

One Country, Two Systems? Although none of the booksellers have disclosed their locations, a few have been in sporadic contact with family members to communicate, in opaque terms, that they are “assisting in an investigation.” On the phone with his wife, Sophie Choi, earlier last week, Lee conveyed that he was calling from Shenzhen, specifying that he, too, was voluntarily helping with a case but, strangely, spoke in Mandarin, the standard mainland dialect, rather than his native Cantonese. [more inside]
posted by frumiousb on Jan 9, 2016 - 14 comments

N. Korea does have a long history of exaggerating its military prowess.

North Korea says it just tested a hydrogen bomb. Here's what we know. [Vox]
According to top experts, it's very plausible this was a test. "I think it is *probably* a test," Jeffrey Lewis, the director of the East Asia Nonproliferation Program at the Monterey Institute of International Studies, tweeted. "DPRK [Democratic People's Republic of Korea, the formal name of North Korea] event epicenter close to test site and on 1/2 hour." Generally, earthquakes don't just happen on exactly the half hour.
[more inside] posted by Fizz on Jan 6, 2016 - 82 comments

"The food is authentic in spirit."

"It was Asian enough for my immigrant parents and American enough for my sister and me." In the PBS feature documentary, Off The Menu, filmmaker Grace Lee traverses the US into the kitchens, factories, temples and farm of Asian Pacific America that explores how our relationship to food reflects our evolving communities. Food Republic spoke with Jonathan Wu and Wilson Tang, whose NYC restaurant, Fung Tu, is featured in the film.
posted by Room 641-A on Dec 31, 2015 - 4 comments

“I told them I would not change a word,”

French journalist accuses China of intimidating foreign press. by Tom Phillips [The Guardian]
China is facing accusations of attempting to muzzle and intimidate foreign press after it said it would expel a French journalist who refused to apologise for an article criticising government policy. Lu Kang, a spokesperson for China’s ministry of foreign affairs, claimed Ursula Gauthier, the Beijing correspondent for French magazine L’Obs, had offended the Chinese people with a recent column about terrorism and the violence-hit region of Xinjiang. “Gauthier failed to apologise to the Chinese people for her wrong words and it is no longer suitable for her to work in China,” Lu said in a statement, according to Xinhua, Beijing’s official news agency.
[more inside] posted by Fizz on Dec 27, 2015 - 21 comments

Gamifying Patriotism

The crew at Extra Credits take a break from their usual videogame-focused content to provide a video overview of Alibaba's gamified Sesame Credit system. The system is one of eight government-overseen pilot programs to establish a "social credit score" for Chinese citizens. [more inside]
posted by tocts on Dec 16, 2015 - 28 comments

Don't expect an invitation

Flying close to Beijing's new South China Sea islands [SLBBC]
posted by T.D. Strange on Dec 14, 2015 - 24 comments

“America represents wilderness and freedom, and also a big house,”

Living a Frontier Dream on the Outskirts of China’s Capital by Andrew Jacobs [New York Times]
Welcome to “Hometown America,” as Jackson Hole is called in Chinese, a mammoth real-estate venture that is an exacting pastiche of an American frontier town, albeit one with a wine-tasting pavilion, a spa and security guards dressed as park rangers, who salute every passing car. Modest entry-level homes sell for $625,000. Larger abodes — described by Jackson Hole’s developers as castles — have an attached vineyard and fetch nearly $8 million. The developer, Ju Yi International, says that more than 90 percent of the 1,500 homes have already been sold. Occupying more than a square mile of arid land in northeast Hebei Province, Jackson Hole has plenty of room to expand.
posted by Fizz on Dec 11, 2015 - 25 comments

An illustrator in Dali, China

Jason Pym is a British illustrator who has been living in Dali, China for 11 years. His love for his adopted city in an idyllic part of Yunnan province is plain to see. He also makes illustrations for Penguin Books China, and labels for his wife's homemade jam, featuring cos-playing dragons. (Here's a link in Chinese with more dragon-goodness.)
posted by of strange foe on Dec 10, 2015 - 7 comments

Ark and flood in one package

The US Defense Intelligence Agency (DIA) was established in 1961 and has grown into one of the US government’s largest intelligence organizations. It employs 17,000 people, including thousands stationed overseas, and its 2013 fiscal year budget request was for $3.15 billion. Yet, the DIA is also one of the more secretive agencies in the U.S. intelligence community, regularly denying access to basic information about its structure, functions and activities. On November 20, the National Security Archive posted a new sourcebook of over 50 declassified documents that help to illuminate the DIA’s five-decades-long history. [more inside]
posted by zarq on Dec 4, 2015 - 20 comments

It's like Uber for Willy Wonka boat rides.

WikiTravel calls The Shanghai Sightseeing Tunnel "A slow-moving tram, through a comically low-tech tunnel of antiquated 80's era rope lights, lasers and car dealership ilk inflatables." YMMV. [SLYT, lots of blinking lights]
posted by Room 641-A on Nov 29, 2015 - 30 comments

Triumph of the Will

From National Geographic YouTube channel: The Shaolin (Wushu) Temple Kung Fu Academy is the largest school of its kind in China. Footage was adapted from filmmaker Inigo Westmeier's 2012 documentary 'Dragon Girls' with music from Gener8tio featuring M.I.A. The Academy has a website.
posted by growabrain on Nov 18, 2015 - 10 comments

If you were with me you'd suffer.

Why Australia has fallen bizarrely in love with a Chinese dating show
posted by bswinburn on Nov 14, 2015 - 28 comments

Taiwan-China leaders to meet for first time since 1949

Taiwan's president Ma Ying-jeou and China's president Xi Jinping will meet in Singapore on Saturday---the first meeting between leaders on both sides of the Taiwan Strait since 1949, when Mao forced the Nationalist regime off mainland China and into retreat into Taiwan. The Singapore meeting set for Saturday has been planned behind the scene for a year. Already, opposition parties in Taiwan are crying foul, calling for the impeachment of Ma and accusing him of going against mainstream public opinion to meet with Xi.
posted by wallawallasweet on Nov 3, 2015 - 15 comments

This is Like a Pearl in My Hand – a collection of portraits

Invisible touch: the artist using magic ink to help China's blind children On a cold day, only the part of the image that has physical contact will be clear. But the sensitivity of the ink means the book looks different depending on the weather: on hot days, all the photographs will be visible at once and with no contact.
posted by Michele in California on Nov 1, 2015 - 1 comment

Myanmar's "Big State Secret"

Global Witness has published a report on the jade industry in Myanmar, a trade "worth far more than previously thought - up to US$31 billion in 2014 alone. That is equivalent to nearly half the GDP of the whole country, which badly needs it. But hardly any of the money is reaching ordinary people or state coffers." [more inside]
posted by mandolin conspiracy on Nov 1, 2015 - 4 comments

China ends one-child policy

China will allow all couples to have two children, a Communist Party leadership meeting decided on Thursday, bringing an end to decades of restrictive policies that limited most urban families to one child. It is estimated that the one-child policy prevented the births of 400 million children since its adoption.
posted by Sir Rinse on Oct 29, 2015 - 129 comments

Meet The Uyghurs

Kevin Kelly spent two weeks in Xinjiang (East Turkestan) in far west China. “This area has more in common with the culture of Turkey than with Beijing. It's kebab with chopsticks. But this is really China. In fact it is the largest province of China.“ Here are 120 photos of the "Silk Road".
Kevin Kelly loves to travel: Read the “Previous Lives“ part on his bio. 
KK's Asia travels on Metafilter before, here and here. [more inside]
posted by growabrain on Oct 28, 2015 - 36 comments

Everyone sing along now. EVERYONE.

What's the 13.5? Why, it's 十三五 - China's 13th Five Year Plan. And here's a happy, chirpy pop song and video to explain it all. (slyt)
posted by Devonian on Oct 27, 2015 - 50 comments

Viaducts and bridges, as made in China

The SLJ900/32 Segmental Bridge Launching Machine. [more inside]
posted by DirtyOldTown on Oct 26, 2015 - 12 comments

Where Daughters Are Preferred

Mosuo, Kingdom of Daughters Not All Chinese Want Sons
posted by Yellow on Oct 26, 2015 - 3 comments

Time and Tide

Life behind the Three Gorges Dam
The major themes of the China story - unprecedented socioeconomic change, environmental crises, the thirst for energy, the destruction of historical and cultural heritage - are all here, framed against the backdrop of millions of ordinary Chinese struggling to cope with the powerful man-made and natural forces beyond their control. Would the huge sacrifices be worth it in the end...
Photo-Essay, over time, by Singaporean photo-journalist Chua Chin Hon
posted by infini on Oct 18, 2015 - 5 comments

Out of the Cultural Revolution, a Nobel Prize and a cure for malaria

Earlier this month, Youyou Tu was awarded the Nobel Prize in medicine for her discovery of artemisinin, also known as qinghaosu. She is the first Chinese Nobel recipient for work that was done in mainland China. Dr. Tu's studies were done in the midst of the Cultural Revolution, a politically precarious time for Chinese academics, which adds a layer of historical complexity to her work. It is difficult to overstate the importance of artemisinin to anti-malarial efforts. Unfortunately, artemisinin-resistant strains of malaria are already beginning to appear only thirty years after the drug was introduced.
posted by sciatrix on Oct 14, 2015 - 12 comments

The tragic tale of Mt Everest’s most famous dead body

The tragic tale of Mt Everest’s most famous dead body is part one of a two part BBC article centered around the story of Tsewang Paljor, known as "Green Boots", whose body has remained for 20 years near the summit where he died. Part two is Death in the clouds: The problem with Everest’s 200+ bodies [more inside]
posted by danny the boy on Oct 9, 2015 - 77 comments

“This is for the kids,” he said, “I’m too old.”

A new trend in headwear is taking China by storm. The New York Times is on the case. [more inside]
posted by theodolite on Oct 7, 2015 - 64 comments

"The Chairman of Everything"

Born Red is a long profile of Xi Jinping, President of China, by Evan Osnos of The New Yorker. Osnos explains the character and policies of China's current leader through his biography. He was privileged son of a revolutionary leader. After the father fell from grace, the son endured a troubled decade. His father was invited back into the fold, and Xi rose through the ranks all the way to the top. Xi is considered the leader of the informal princeling faction of the Chinese Communist Party. He has put a focus on combating corruption, which had gone out of control in the last couple of decades, and stifling dissent. Recent months have seen tumultuous stock markets and a large army parade. Since coming to power, a personality cult has been promoted by the state. Jeffrey Wasserstrom makes a comparison between the Chinese President and the Pope.
posted by Kattullus on Sep 19, 2015 - 10 comments

Chinese calligraphy and painting manual from 1633 now online, in full

Since 1933, the Cambridge University Library has had a pristine copy of Shi zhu zhai shu hua pu, the Ten Bamboo Studio collection of calligraphy and painting from 1633. Because the book was so fragile, the butterfly bound (Google books preview) manual for teachers of art and writing was not opened until it could be properly digitized. That day has come, and the entire book is online, giving the world a view of “the earliest and the most beautiful example of multicolor printing anywhere in the world,” according to Charles Aylmer, head of the Chinese department at Cambridge University Library. [more inside]
posted by filthy light thief on Sep 11, 2015 - 13 comments

Why drivers in China intentionally kill the pedestrians they hit.

Driven to Kill. The "hit-to-kill" phenomenon in China where a driver who has accidentally struck a pedestrian will stop to run over them again, or multiple times, to ensure they are dead. Trigger warning for text descriptions of gruesome vehicular murder. Lots of links to photos and videos in the article that you should click at your own discretion.
posted by allkindsoftime on Sep 9, 2015 - 83 comments

Basic Income: How to Fix a Broken Monetary Transmission Mechanism

FINLAND: New Government Commits to a Basic Income Experiment - "The Finnish government of Juha Sipilä is considering a pilot project that would give everyone of working age a basic income."[1,2,3] (via) [more inside]
posted by kliuless on Sep 4, 2015 - 24 comments

De Profundis Clamavi, o mandarin

In a week when China's troubled economy and plunging stock market have made headlines worldwide, the Globe and Mail probes one of hidden causes of the difficulty the country faces in transitioning to a modern consumer economy: The Ant Tribe, the middle class Chinese who are literally being driven underground. [more inside]
posted by Diablevert on Aug 25, 2015 - 20 comments

Three Stars Mound

In 1986, workers in Sichuan province in China were digging for clay for bricks when they stumbled onto an archaeological treasure: a major site for a Bronze Age civilization previously only guessed at. The civilization, called Sanxingdui (wikipedia), had an art style unlike any other Chinese civilization previously encountered. Archaeologists had suspected there was a major city in the area since an early jade find in 1929 and a team went to work immediately, unearthing burial pits and gorgeous artifacts. (More history of the site.) An exhibit of treasures from Sanxingdui is on display in Houston until September; a permanent display can be found at a museum dedicated to the culture in Chengdu. Meanwhile, archaeologists continue to discover more of the city (warning: autoplay video) and even the remains of some of the inhabitants.
posted by immlass on Aug 18, 2015 - 6 comments

♫ Corn Wars/if they should scorn wars/please let these Corn Wars stay ♫

Corn Wars: The farm-by-farm fight between China and the United States to dominate the global food supply. The U.S. Department of Justice and the FBI now contend, in effect, that the theft of genetically modified corn technology is as credible a threat to national security as the spread to nation-states of the technology necessary to deliver and detonate nuclear warheads. Disturbingly, they may be right. As the global population continues to climb and climate change makes arable soil and water for irrigation ever more scarce, the world’s next superpower will be determined not just by which country has the most military might but also, and more importantly, by its mastery of the technology required to produce large quantities of food.
posted by Cash4Lead on Aug 18, 2015 - 26 comments

Page: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 ... 23