1152 posts tagged with China.
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“We live in China, but we saw Fugazi’s DVD as many times as you guys did in America,” says Xubo, singer and guitarist for the most successful contemporary emo band in China, Chinese Football. “I grew up [on] the late ‘90s and early ’00s pop-punk and emo wave,” he says, “so I loved U.S. bands like blink-182, Green Day, Jimmy Eat World, and all the bands from Drive-Thru Records back in high school. As I grew up, I listened to more and more.” - The rise of Emo in Asia
posted by Potomac Avenue on Oct 20, 2016 - 4 comments

a box of worthless amazing crap

What $50 buys you at Huaqiangbei, the world’s most fascinating electronics market.
posted by DynamiteToast on Oct 14, 2016 - 61 comments

My saying is: We win and lose together

As we stand four weeks to election day, we know more about the candidates, and it's not good. Things have also recently not been great for Donald; following the taped revelations of last week, involving yet another (and now dismissed) member of the Bush dynasty, a fiery and ugly debate ensued (MetaFilter). Since then, he has marched increasingly alone; Paul Ryan has all but unendorsed him, John McCain has had enough, a lot of other Republicans are doing their own thing, and his friends are mainly the apologist Ben Carson, Rudy Giuliani, a 'coward' in Florida, and Wikileaks and dubious Russian information services (leading perhaps to a campaign event cancellation). [more inside]
posted by Wordshore on Oct 11, 2016 - 3499 comments

'Chabuduo': How China became the land of disastrous corner-cutting

The prevailing attitude [in China] is chabuduo, or ‘close enough’. It’s a phrase you’ll hear with grating regularity, one that speaks to a job 70 per cent done, a plan sketched out but never completed, a gauge unchecked or a socket put in the wrong size. Chabuduo is the corrosive opposite of the impulse towards craftmanship...it implies that to put any more time or effort into a piece of work would be the act of a fool. China is the land of the cut corner, of ‘good enough for government work’.
posted by beijingbrown on Oct 5, 2016 - 69 comments

“My Moby-Dick has been Zhongwang”

Two years ago, a California aluminum executive commissioned a pilot to fly over the Mexican town of San José Iturbide, at the foot of the Sierra Gorda mountains, and snap aerial photos of a remote desert factory. He made a startling discovery. Nearly one million metric tons of aluminum sat neatly stacked behind a fortress of barbed-wire fences. The stockpile, worth some $2 billion and representing roughly 6% of the world’s total inventory—enough to churn out 2.2 million Ford F-150s or 77 billion beer cans—quickly became an obsession for the U.S. aluminum industry. Now it is a new source of tension in U.S.-Chinese trade relations. U.S. executives contend that the mysterious cache was part of a brazen scheme by one of China’s richest men to game the global trade system. The Wall Street Journal reports [more inside]
posted by chavenet on Sep 8, 2016 - 25 comments

Colonialism’s long shadow over Southeast Asia today

How did Southeast Asian identities originate? The legacy of the 19th century continues to shape us more than we think 'We also wanted to show how many of the things that we may accept and take as ‘normal’ and ever-present in our part of the world were, in fact, fairly recent innovations introduced to Southeast Asia during the colonial era'. Political scientist and historian Dr Farish Noor hosts a three-part series examining the legacy Western colonialism has left upon a region now known as Southeast Asia. The first episode, 'Conquerors & Merchants', is now available for viewing online. [more inside]
posted by cendawanita on Sep 5, 2016 - 20 comments

Who you gonna call? (An-ces-tors!)

15 Funky Things Chinese People Burnt for their Ancestors A quirky look into a mainstay ritual of the Hungry Ghost Festival. What's that? From the Straits Times: All You Need to Know and Heed about the 7th Month Celebrations. From The Beijinger: Everything You Need to Know About this Year's Ghost Festival. And maybe you're familiar with the festival and all its taboos. Or are you?
posted by cendawanita on Aug 17, 2016 - 7 comments

All Adele covers can go home now

A Chinese Opera cover of 'Rolling in the Deep', by Chinese actor Jia Nai Liang
posted by cendawanita on Aug 12, 2016 - 7 comments

Now this is a BUS

China has created a Transit Elevated Bus or "straddle bus" and just unveiled a working prototype in Qinhuangdao, Hebei province. Be sure to scroll down for the video of it in action.
posted by agatha_magatha on Aug 3, 2016 - 58 comments

Putonghua or bust

In China: Chinese dialects fight for survival. Outside China: Meet the Hong Kong academics fighting to safeguard the Cantonese language (Hong Kong); Taiwanese: a doomed language? (Taiwan); Do you speak Singlish? || The Death of Dialects in Singapore (Singapore); Penang Hokkien will be ‘dead’ in 40 years if people stop using it (Malaysia) [more inside]
posted by cendawanita on Aug 3, 2016 - 40 comments


"Biologists have found that human language, like bird song, may evolve to accommodate its environment through acoustic adaptation. In the internet, a similar phenomenon happens to our visual languages: our memes hold something of the digital landscapes they proliferate in. In China, the digitally-active keep folders of 表情 (biǎo qíng) [gifs], which literally means “facial expression.”

An introductory field guide to the Chinese biaoqing.

posted by joshwa on Aug 2, 2016 - 11 comments

Crisis on high

At the top of the world a climate disaster is unfolding that will impact the lives of more than 1 billion people.
posted by smoke on Jul 24, 2016 - 46 comments

“For many decades, if not centuries, pu’er was seen as a “rough” tea.”

Gao’s Map by Christopher St. Cavish [The California Sunday Magazine] On the trail of one of the most expensive, controversial teas in the world. [more inside]
posted by Fizz on Jul 16, 2016 - 8 comments

Modern China is So Crazy It Needs a New Literary Genre

Ning Ken's 4000-word essay translated by Thomas Moran. In the 1980s, when China was starting to open up to the world, Latin American literature, with Gabriel García Márquez as the representative, poured into China. When we read “magic realism,” it seemed familiar, it seemed close to us, and that is because in their suffering and their difficult, incredible histories, Chinese people and Latin Americans have a lot in common. Indeed, in the 1980s we often spoke of China as a place of “magic realism.” But since the 1990s, and especially in the past dozen years or so, China is no longer that place; it is now a place of the “ultra-unreal.” [more inside]
posted by cgc373 on Jul 5, 2016 - 19 comments

"neighbors inviting themselves over for dinner"

Twitch has just added a social eating category. It's not as unprecedented as it sounds: watching other people eat has been popular in Korea and China for years. "Some viewers tune in for feats of extraordinary eating, others for vicarious gratification during diets. Most commonly, viewers and observers of the phenomenon say that streaming mukbang during mealtime alleviates the melancholy and discomfort of eating alone in a society where shared meals are the fundamental unit of social life."
posted by perplexion on Jun 30, 2016 - 20 comments

Tibetan Girls, We are in the Process of Losing ‘Plateau Redness’

藏族姑娘,我们正在消失的那抹高原红 [more inside]
posted by the man of twists and turns on Jun 29, 2016 - 21 comments

Legal Bodies

China has very strict controls on moving money out of the country. China's new president, Xi Jinping, has been cracking down on corruption at the highest levels, consolidating his control over the government. What to do if you're a corrupt official worried you may find yourself on the wrong side of the new regime? Buy a Japanese son. Japanese surrogacy ring producing Japanese-citizen babies for Chinese nationals: Part 1, Part 2
posted by Diablevert on Jun 22, 2016 - 17 comments

the greatest mermaid war movie never seen

SUNK - "How a Chinese billionaire’s dream of making an underwater fantasy blockbuster turned into a legendary movie fiasco." [more inside]
posted by the man of twists and turns on Jun 13, 2016 - 39 comments

GPS jammin'

FAA warns of widespread GPS outage. The FAA advisory (pdf). The FAA is warning pilots that there will be several widespread outages of the GPS syste centered on China Lake, California, home of the Navy’s China Lake Naval Weapons Center. A military GPS jamming system? Let the conspiracy theories commence.
posted by GuyZero on Jun 7, 2016 - 79 comments

Anyone would do it.

Chinese students gaming entry into and passage through Western universities The advertisements were tailored for Chinese college students far from home, struggling with the English language and an unfamiliar culture. Coaching services peppered the students with emails and chat messages in Chinese, offering to help foreign students at U.S. colleges do much of the work necessary for a university degree. The companies would author essays for clients. Handle their homework. Even take their exams. All for about a $1,000 a course.
posted by modernnomad on May 30, 2016 - 48 comments

Scaling the Heights in China

To attend class, backpack-carrying pupils from Atuler village in Sichuan province must take on an 800-metre [2,600-foot] rock face, scrambling down rickety ladders and clawing their way over bare rocks as they go. (SLGuardian with internal link to original reporting in Chinese)
posted by bryon on May 27, 2016 - 10 comments

The Curious History of “Tribal” Prints

How the Dutch peddle Indonesian-inspired designs to West Africa. [more inside]
posted by Blasdelb on May 27, 2016 - 10 comments

Feeding A Billion People

Turpan Yuanyang Xiapu (SLYT) [more inside]
posted by Michele in California on May 22, 2016 - 4 comments

My chow mein beats your chop suey anyday

Chandrima S. Bhattacharya traces the journey of the ubiquitous Calcutta chowmin [more inside]
posted by infini on May 18, 2016 - 10 comments

"History shows us that minorities do not count until they are counted."

What is it like to be queer in China? UNDP has just launched Being LGBTI in China – A National Survey on Social Attitudes towards Sexual Orientation, Gender Identity and Gender Expression. With 30,000 respondents, the survey is the largest to date on the topic in China. [more inside]
posted by showbiz_liz on May 18, 2016 - 2 comments

The best basket in China

A brave woman valiantly attempts to prevent panda bears from climbing into a basket of leaves while she rakes.
posted by ChuraChura on May 18, 2016 - 57 comments

(Hip) Hop Gun

A fast-paced new Chinese recruiting video for the People’s Liberation Army “lures recruits with rap music.” The Marine Corps Times calls it “insane,” saying, “U.S. military recruiters take note: It's time to up your game.” [more inside]
posted by LeLiLo on May 9, 2016 - 49 comments

A People's History of the Cultural Revolution, 1962–1976

A New Look At China's Cultural Revolution - "Historian Frank Dikötter says newly opened archives offer fresh details about the chaos China experienced in the 1960s, when Chairman Mao urged students to take to the streets." [more inside]
posted by kliuless on May 9, 2016 - 19 comments

Embroidery on Youtube

Embroider a Guanyin with the hair of the descendant of Rinpoches. Embroider with hooks and gold in India. Embroider with the techniques of European (late) renaissance and modern embroidery. Embroider (...eventually) a kimono. Embroider with horsetail. Embroider with designer Yohji Yamamoto. Embroider like a Ukrainian.
posted by flibbertigibbet on May 2, 2016 - 5 comments

The Great Firewall of China has blocked The Economist

After leading with a cover story criticizing Xi Jinping (otoh) The Economist has been censored in China; Time too and now Medium. [more inside]
posted by kliuless on Apr 20, 2016 - 24 comments

Six bulldozers enter....

A legitimate royal rumble between heavy machinery: construction workers were from two competing companies allegedly get mad... and get even.
posted by Mezentian on Apr 19, 2016 - 20 comments

Why Revolutionaries Love Spicy Food

The shrewd peasant organizer had a mean, even “spiteful” streak. “For example, for a long time I could not accustom myself to the strongly spiced food, such as hot fried peppers, which is traditional to southern China, especially in Hunan, Mao’s birthplace.” The Soviet agent’s tender taste buds invited Mao’s mockery. “The food of the true revolutionary is the red pepper,” declared Mao. “And he who cannot endure red peppers is also unable to fight.’ ” How the chili pepper got to China by Andrew Leonard
posted by chavenet on Apr 18, 2016 - 8 comments

Ginger Baker had one.

Inside Erik Prince’s Treacherous Drive to Build a Private Air Force
Jeremy Scahill continues keeping tabs on Mr Blackwater; Xe; Reflex Responses Erik Prince now Chairman of the Chinese Fsgroup set to loot Africa.
posted by adamvasco on Apr 12, 2016 - 42 comments

Buried Ideas

‘For over two millennia,’ Ian Johnson writes, ‘all our knowledge of China’s great philosophical schools was limited to texts revised after the Qin unification.’ Now a trove of recently discovered ancient documents, written on strips of bamboo, ‘is helping to reshape our understanding of China’s contentious past.’ [more inside]
posted by schneckinlittle on Apr 11, 2016 - 13 comments

Golden Mountain Dim Sum

How U.S. Immigration Law Fueled A Chinese Restaurant Boom
posted by infini on Feb 28, 2016 - 11 comments

by Joseph E. Stiglitz

China Has Overtaken the U.S. as the World’s Largest Economy
posted by infini on Feb 21, 2016 - 45 comments

"This is the sound of China’s young and restless."

A mixtape featuring 20 young independent bands from China, curated by Wooozy, one of the country's leading indie music blogs. "From sunny Guangzhou and cyberpunk Chongqing to the frigid northeast grasslands beyond Beijing. From shoegaze to riot-weird." It can also be downloaded in full here.
posted by beijingbrown on Feb 13, 2016 - 16 comments

Your Friday touch of Zen

With the highly-anticipated release of two King Hu masterpieces on home video by the Masters of Cinema organization, as well as the critical success of Hou Hsiao-hsien’s The Assassin last year, it seems like the wuxia film is making some inroads into the Western critical consciousness. So I thought I’d put together a guide to some of the essential films of the genre. - 30 Essential Wuxia Films
posted by Artw on Feb 12, 2016 - 32 comments

"There’s white and then there’s the how-white-my-shirts-can-be white..."

Stealing White: How a corporate spy swiped plans for DuPont’s billion-dollar color formula By Del Quentin Wilber [Bloomberg Business]
“At first, you’re like: Why are they stealing the color white? I had to Google it to figure out what titanium dioxide even was,” says Dean Chappell, acting section chief of counterespionage for the FBI. “Then you realize there is a strategy to it.” You can’t even call it spying, adds John Carlin, the assistant attorney general in charge of the U.S. Department of Justice’s national security division. “This is theft. And this—stealing the color white—is a very good example of the problem. It’s not a national security secret. It’s about stealing something you can make a buck off of. It’s part of a strategy to profit off what American ingenuity creates.”
posted by Fizz on Feb 5, 2016 - 58 comments

Chang'e 3 moon shots

The China National Space Administration released all of the images from their Chang'e 3 moon landing mission (previously), including hundreds of amazing true color, HD photographs. Some 35 GB of datasets, including photographs of and by the Yutu rover have been difficult to retrieve outside of China and have been mirrored by Emily Lakdawalla at planetary.org.
posted by a lungful of dragon on Feb 1, 2016 - 27 comments

Worst. Tablecloth. Pulling. Gig. Ever.

They misunderstood my ability to be a dick, when correctly inspired. Juggler and comedian Mat Ricardo describes a nightmare gig in Beijing, starting with a (supposed) world record attempt and ending with a mad dash for the airport.
posted by gottabefunky on Jan 19, 2016 - 60 comments

The Case of the Missing Hong Kong Booksellers

One Country, Two Systems? Although none of the booksellers have disclosed their locations, a few have been in sporadic contact with family members to communicate, in opaque terms, that they are “assisting in an investigation.” On the phone with his wife, Sophie Choi, earlier last week, Lee conveyed that he was calling from Shenzhen, specifying that he, too, was voluntarily helping with a case but, strangely, spoke in Mandarin, the standard mainland dialect, rather than his native Cantonese. [more inside]
posted by frumiousb on Jan 9, 2016 - 14 comments

N. Korea does have a long history of exaggerating its military prowess.

North Korea says it just tested a hydrogen bomb. Here's what we know. [Vox]
According to top experts, it's very plausible this was a test. "I think it is *probably* a test," Jeffrey Lewis, the director of the East Asia Nonproliferation Program at the Monterey Institute of International Studies, tweeted. "DPRK [Democratic People's Republic of Korea, the formal name of North Korea] event epicenter close to test site and on 1/2 hour." Generally, earthquakes don't just happen on exactly the half hour.
[more inside] posted by Fizz on Jan 6, 2016 - 82 comments

"The food is authentic in spirit."

"It was Asian enough for my immigrant parents and American enough for my sister and me." In the PBS feature documentary, Off The Menu, filmmaker Grace Lee traverses the US into the kitchens, factories, temples and farm of Asian Pacific America that explores how our relationship to food reflects our evolving communities. Food Republic spoke with Jonathan Wu and Wilson Tang, whose NYC restaurant, Fung Tu, is featured in the film.
posted by Room 641-A on Dec 31, 2015 - 4 comments

“I told them I would not change a word,”

French journalist accuses China of intimidating foreign press. by Tom Phillips [The Guardian]
China is facing accusations of attempting to muzzle and intimidate foreign press after it said it would expel a French journalist who refused to apologise for an article criticising government policy. Lu Kang, a spokesperson for China’s ministry of foreign affairs, claimed Ursula Gauthier, the Beijing correspondent for French magazine L’Obs, had offended the Chinese people with a recent column about terrorism and the violence-hit region of Xinjiang. “Gauthier failed to apologise to the Chinese people for her wrong words and it is no longer suitable for her to work in China,” Lu said in a statement, according to Xinhua, Beijing’s official news agency.
[more inside] posted by Fizz on Dec 27, 2015 - 21 comments

Gamifying Patriotism

The crew at Extra Credits take a break from their usual videogame-focused content to provide a video overview of Alibaba's gamified Sesame Credit system. The system is one of eight government-overseen pilot programs to establish a "social credit score" for Chinese citizens. [more inside]
posted by tocts on Dec 16, 2015 - 28 comments

Don't expect an invitation

Flying close to Beijing's new South China Sea islands [SLBBC]
posted by T.D. Strange on Dec 14, 2015 - 24 comments

“America represents wilderness and freedom, and also a big house,”

Living a Frontier Dream on the Outskirts of China’s Capital by Andrew Jacobs [New York Times]
Welcome to “Hometown America,” as Jackson Hole is called in Chinese, a mammoth real-estate venture that is an exacting pastiche of an American frontier town, albeit one with a wine-tasting pavilion, a spa and security guards dressed as park rangers, who salute every passing car. Modest entry-level homes sell for $625,000. Larger abodes — described by Jackson Hole’s developers as castles — have an attached vineyard and fetch nearly $8 million. The developer, Ju Yi International, says that more than 90 percent of the 1,500 homes have already been sold. Occupying more than a square mile of arid land in northeast Hebei Province, Jackson Hole has plenty of room to expand.
posted by Fizz on Dec 11, 2015 - 25 comments

An illustrator in Dali, China

Jason Pym is a British illustrator who has been living in Dali, China for 11 years. His love for his adopted city in an idyllic part of Yunnan province is plain to see. He also makes illustrations for Penguin Books China, and labels for his wife's homemade jam, featuring cos-playing dragons. (Here's a link in Chinese with more dragon-goodness.)
posted by of strange foe on Dec 10, 2015 - 7 comments

Ark and flood in one package

The US Defense Intelligence Agency (DIA) was established in 1961 and has grown into one of the US government’s largest intelligence organizations. It employs 17,000 people, including thousands stationed overseas, and its 2013 fiscal year budget request was for $3.15 billion. Yet, the DIA is also one of the more secretive agencies in the U.S. intelligence community, regularly denying access to basic information about its structure, functions and activities. On November 20, the National Security Archive posted a new sourcebook of over 50 declassified documents that help to illuminate the DIA’s five-decades-long history. [more inside]
posted by zarq on Dec 4, 2015 - 20 comments

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