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How Hou Yi Shot The Suns

In the time of the Chou Dynasty it was believed there existed Ten Celestial Suns. Each day, one sun would be harnessed to a jade dragon and drawn across the heavens, bringing life and light to the world. It was their duty, all they had known - but in their hearts a cold and secret fire grew... [more inside]
posted by Effigy2000 on Dec 6, 2010 - 22 comments

Ni hao, Brute

Genetic testing of villagers in a remote part of China has shown that nearly two thirds of their DNA is of Caucasian origin, lending support to the theory that they may be descended from a 'lost legion' of Roman soldiers.
posted by The Lady is a designer on Nov 28, 2010 - 28 comments

made in china

Traditional patterns exquisitely turned into objects of little worth l car | tv | polo shirts by Li Xiaofeng | Twisted porcelain | The Porcelain War Museum and more by Charles Krafft | Manga Ormolu by Brendan Tang | Ming meets the tin can by Lei Xue. [more inside]
posted by nickyskye on Nov 17, 2010 - 7 comments

Coal Without Carbon

Dirty Coal, Clean Future
To environmentalists, "clean coal" is an insulting oxymoron. But for now, the only way to meet the world's energy needs, and to arrest climate change before it produces irreversible cataclysm, is to use coal—dirty, sooty, toxic coal—in more-sustainable ways. The good news is that new technologies are making this possible. China is now the leader in this area, the Google and Intel of the energy world. If we are serious about global warming, America needs to work with China to build a greener future on a foundation of coal. Otherwise, the clean-energy revolution will leave us behind, with grave costs for the world's climate and our economy. (more here and responses here, here and here)
posted by kliuless on Nov 12, 2010 - 49 comments

"They're not enemies, but frenemies."

Complex China-U.S. currency issue explained in bizarre news animation. "Need a primer on the issues? Check out our US-Sino Currency Rap Battle, featuring Chinese president Hu Jintao and American president Barack Obama. China has mad stacks of US Treasury debt and fears America will inflate its way out the hole by weakening the greenback further. The US, on the other hand, says China is keeping its currency artificially undervalued to protect its exports. It's a battle for the ages. And everything you need to know about US-Sino trade relations can be learned right here."
posted by Fizz on Nov 10, 2010 - 27 comments

Harmonious Society

The Crab Party that got China's most famous artist arrested. [more inside]
posted by Heliochrome85 on Nov 9, 2010 - 50 comments

Chasing Pirates: Inside Microsoft’s War Room

Chasing Pirates: Inside Microsoft’s War Room - From the special thread that Chinese factories counterfeit in mile-long spools that adorns software authenticity stickers, to near-perfect bootleg discs leaving microscopic evidence of their factory origins, to Mexican and Russian gangsters who are dealt with very carefully, the NYT covers Microsoft's multi-pronged, international war on piracy.
posted by Blazecock Pileon on Nov 7, 2010 - 30 comments

who isn't guilty of inciting subversion of state power

A lesser-known signatory of Charter 08 is an artist and human rights activist named Wu Yuren. And, like this year's Nobel Peace Prize winner, he's now in prison. His wife, Karen Patterson, is a Canadian, from Calgary. And she believes his activism is why he's been detained by Chinese authorities for almost five months.
posted by acro on Oct 23, 2010 - 3 comments

Crab Vending Machine.

Here is the live crab vending machine you have been asking for all this time. Love, China.
posted by XQUZYPHYR on Oct 22, 2010 - 99 comments

Cheap Water

The race is on: India by 2020, China by 2025 - will the US get there at all?
posted by PuppyCat on Oct 21, 2010 - 24 comments

50 Cabbage "kimchi crisis" Warning

The latest crisis in South Korea is not coming from its northern neighbor. The country is reeling from the soaring price of kimchi. China responds with concern. "The politics editor of a major South Korean newspaper called the kimchi situation "a national tragedy,” and an editorial in Dong-a Ilbo termed it “a once in a century crisis.” previously
posted by Xurando on Oct 15, 2010 - 25 comments

Anatomical illustrations from Edo-period Japan

Old anatomical illustrations that provide a unique perspective on the evolution of medical knowledge in Japan during the Edo period (1603-1868) [more inside]
posted by gman on Oct 14, 2010 - 27 comments

Freud in China

Despite the social stigma that still surrounds mental illness, doctors are eager to learn and apply psychotherapy, and thanks to Skype and a healthy supply of retired American therapists, Freudian psychoanalysis is enjoying a renaissance in China.
posted by jetsetlag on Oct 11, 2010 - 27 comments

"For his long and non-violent struggle for fundamental human rights in China"

The 2010 Nobel Peace Prize goes to Chinese dissident Liu Xiaobo. Beijing had previously warned the Nobel committee not to honour Liu. A BBC biography of Liu from last year: "Now his name is unknown. But one day, even if he's not regarded as a hero, he'll be thought of as a very good citizen - a model example."
posted by WPW on Oct 8, 2010 - 63 comments

We don't need you to type at all

"With your permission you give us more information about you, about your friends, and we can improve the quality of our searches," [Google CEO Eric Schmidt] said. "We don't need you to type at all. We know where you are. We know where you've been. We can more or less know what you're thinking about... We can look at bad behavior and modify it." The Atlantic's editor James Bennet discusses with Schmidt how lobbyists write America's laws, how America's research universities are the best in the world, how the Chinese are going all-out in investing in their infrastructure, how the US should have allowed automakers to fail, and ultimately Google's evolving role in an technologically-augmented society in this broad, interesting and scary interview (~25 min Flash video) [via]
posted by Blazecock Pileon on Oct 4, 2010 - 55 comments

A Compendium of Obscure Things

Res Obscura is a blog by Ben Breen, a graduate student of early modern history, which styles itself "a compendium of obscure things." Indeed, even the asides are full of wonder, such as the one about Boy, the famous Royalist war poodle of the English Civil War, which is but a short addendum to a post about witches' familiars. Here are some of my favorite posts, Pirate Surgeon in Panama (and a related post about 18th Century Jamaica), vanished civilizations, asemic pseudo-Arabic and -Hebrew writing in Renaissance art, and a series of posts about the way the Chinese and Japanese understood the world outside Asia in the early modern period (Europeans as 'Other', Europeans as 'Other,' Redux and Early Chinese World Maps).
posted by Kattullus on Sep 30, 2010 - 16 comments

Chinese BBSes

The BBS scene in China. Here, here and here.
posted by lipsum on Sep 27, 2010 - 12 comments

Welcome to the Evil Federated Empire of Europe

Europe according to... is a project to map stereotypes of European countries according to other countries and groups of people. [more inside]
posted by desjardins on Sep 22, 2010 - 57 comments

Quyi

"He sits at a table and spins his yarn, his only requisites being a small stick, the so-called 'wakening-rod' xingmu (in Yangzhou storytelling called 'talking stopper' zhiyu), a handkerchief and a fan."
A comprehensive guide to the art and tradition of Chinese Storytelling — with photographs, text, audio and video clips illustrating elements of performance.
posted by unliteral on Sep 21, 2010 - 3 comments

The Man Who Makes Your iPhone

The Man Who Makes Your iPhone - Bloomberg Businessweek profiles Terry Gou, the founder and chairman of Foxconn, the controversial manufacturer of consumer electronic devices for Apple, Sony, HP and Dell, among others.
posted by Blazecock Pileon on Sep 11, 2010 - 19 comments

Wealthy young Chinese enjoy a classless society

The “Rich Second Generation” (富二代) refers to people who mostly were born after 1980s, Children of early China’s first generation of private entrepreneurs “Rich first Generation” after China’s “opening door policy”. Now they are wealthy because of the inheritance. They enjoy roses, wine tasting, marriage opportunities, studying abroad, 43 luxury vehicles, and legal privileges.
posted by twoleftfeet on Aug 29, 2010 - 16 comments

China's Got Talent

"Pianist Liu Wei sits quietly to compose himself before plunging into the music. Then he takes off a sock. The 23-year-old, whose arms were amputated after a childhood accident, plays the piano with his toes."
posted by gman on Aug 27, 2010 - 16 comments

Still a failed state

Ahmed Rashid writes about The Anarchic Republic of Pakistan as amid the flooding the CIA resumes its drone campaign and Pakistan is to clamp down on Islamist militant charities while the Chinese give Military Assistance. [more inside]
posted by adamvasco on Aug 25, 2010 - 17 comments

Expat parent

Reflections on expat parenting in China
posted by bardophile on Aug 19, 2010 - 23 comments

"This is just the beginning."

China is now the world's second-largest economy.
posted by knave on Aug 16, 2010 - 70 comments

Red Army Orchestra + Beat It (3LYT)

Beat It, as performed by the (Chinese) Red Army Orchestra. Or maybe you would prefer 4 Minutes, or a little bit of context.
posted by haltingproblemsolved on Aug 15, 2010 - 11 comments

The Sinica Podcast

What's China up to in Africa? What books should I read on the world's most populous nation? How's their environment doing? This, and much more from the weekly updated Sinica podcast. Hosted by Popup Chinese.
posted by klue on Aug 15, 2010 - 5 comments

毛新宇

Pudgy Mao Xinyu is the youngest major general in the Chinese army, perhaps due to nepotism.
posted by xowie on Aug 5, 2010 - 33 comments

Big Ol' Bus

China to build ginormous buses that cars can drive under. [more inside]
posted by Chipmazing on Aug 3, 2010 - 102 comments

The faces we wear

Faces, a short animation by Lei Lei (雷磊), an independent Chinese animator and designer. He's put most of his works on Vimeo, including a short TEDxShanghai talk he gave several months ago. [more inside]
posted by zabuni on Jul 30, 2010 - 5 comments

China Crisis

The Gilded Age: China 2013 - The dystopian novel that's turning China upside down
posted by Artw on Jul 29, 2010 - 26 comments

In the Spotlight, China Re-Finding Religion

This week NPR featured a five part series of stories entitled, "New Believers: A religious revolution in China" that explores the growth and status of religion in China today. [more inside]
posted by Atreides on Jul 23, 2010 - 65 comments

What's the cost to FedEx stuff to China?

Oppressive treatment of Chinese hipsters reaches new highs. Do you like PBR? Seriously? Then you'll have no problem paying $44 a bottle for it.
Price does not include required champagne flute
posted by yerfatma on Jul 20, 2010 - 128 comments

"Google has inadvertently waded into disputes from Israel to Cambodia to Iran"

The Agnostic Cartographer : How Google’s open-ended maps are embroiling the company in some of the world’s touchiest geopolitical disputes.
posted by desjardins on Jul 18, 2010 - 23 comments

Hans Rosling on global population growth

Hans Rosling, who helped usher in TED talks way back when using stunning visuals, envisions how the world will look in 50 years as global population grows to 9 billion. To check further population growth, which might have disastrous consequences, he exhorts us to raise the living standards of the poorest. [more inside]
posted by kliuless on Jul 11, 2010 - 14 comments

An Obsolete Practice

The use of movable type in China is now a rare business. Invented in China by Bi Sheng during the Song Dynasty, movable type was created as a system to print lengthy Buddhist scripture. This traditional method has mostly been replaced by offset and digital printing, but lately, there has been discussion about collecting these existing artifacts and setting up printing museums or digitizing the complete fonts.
posted by netbros on Jul 3, 2010 - 10 comments

Adaptation to High Altitude in Tibet

Tibetans May Be Fastest Evolutionary Adapters Ever. "A group of scientists in China, Denmark and the U.S. recently documented the fastest genetic change observed in humans. According to their findings, Tibetan adaption to high altitude might have taken just 3,000 years. That's a flash, in terms of evolutionary time, but it's one that's in dispute."
posted by homunculus on Jul 2, 2010 - 12 comments

"Yeah, we have a lot of oil in Scotland."

Say you're a Chinese company wishing to appear more global and well-to-do without all the messy hubbub of hiring a foreigner. What do you do? Drop $44 and rent a white guy.
posted by griphus on Jun 29, 2010 - 90 comments

A Minute and 100 Metres Down the Road

A Minute and 100 Metres Down the Road. The soldier outside the station had one hand on the barrel and the other on the butt of his shotgun. There were two military trucks by the bus stop and two soldiers in the back-right seats of every bus leaving Urumqi station... I arrived via long-haul train, 40 hours and just under 4000km in a hard-seat, from Beijing, where rumours were circulating about the extent of the military presence, needle attacks, Uighur and Han street gangs, and the validity of the reports coming out of Xinjiang. After four days I left with more doubts about why ethnic tensions in Urumqi arose and how they could be resolved. [more inside]
posted by KokuRyu on Jun 27, 2010 - 2 comments

Newsweek is dying, long live Newsweek

Newsweek was put up for sale in May due to multi-year losses. Last week, China’s Southern Daily Group made an unsuccessful bid to buy it. It was the first Chinese bid for a Western publication, and the Group expects to make similar purchases in the future. "It is like dating… it doesn't matter if one date does not like you. You grow from it." [more inside]
posted by mondaygreens on Jun 21, 2010 - 33 comments

a day in the life

He might've placed a couple of chips into your Mac, Dell or Hewlett-Packard. Meet Yuan Yandong.
posted by flapjax at midnite on Jun 20, 2010 - 24 comments

Andrew "bunnie" Huang: taking it apart and making it better, then telling others how it's done

Andrew Shane Huang is a 35 year old hardware hacker, known to some as bunnie, and others as that guy who hacked the Xbox and went on to write a book about it. Finding the hidden key to the Xbox was an enjoyable distraction while he worked on getting his PhD in Electrical Engineering from MIT as part of Project Aries. Since then, he has written for (and been written about) in Make Magazine, has giving talks on the strategy of hardware openness and manufacturing practices in China, as experienced with the development of the opensource ambient "internet-based TV" called Chumby. When he's not busy on such excursions, bunnie writes about hacking (and more specifically, Chumby hacking), technology in China, and even biology in exquisite detail on the bunnie studios blog (previously). [more inside]
posted by filthy light thief on Jun 17, 2010 - 36 comments

Lord of war

For his graduation piece, Central Academy of Fine Arts sculpture student Bi Heng (毕横) made a 9.4 metre tall Transformer-like statue of apotheosised martial hero Guan Yu; the base vehicle Bi cannibalised was another icon of the Chinese battlefield, the Jiefang truck (more pics, video in Chinese)
posted by Abiezer on Jun 9, 2010 - 20 comments

Tower Defence

Last year, Yang Youde learned that his land had been requisitioned. Since the compensation terms for breaking the contract had not been settled, he has refused to move out. "The evictors said many times that they will move on me." Earlier this year, Yang took measures to protect himself. He took a hand-truck and removed the front. Then he put in a set of rockets for use as an artillery battery.
posted by Artw on Jun 8, 2010 - 34 comments

Nixon in China, Houston Grand Opera, 1987

We've had excerpts before, but this is the full performance. Nixon in China, with music by John Adams, libretto by Alice Goodman and choreography by Mark Morris. Directed by Peter Sellars, conducted by John DeMain, and presented by Walter Chronkite. Houston Grand Opera, 1987. Parts 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17
posted by Navelgazer on Jun 7, 2010 - 17 comments

Towards the exascale

From the BBC, A graphical treemap of the top 500 supercomputers in the world, arranged by country, speed, OS, application, processor and manufacturer. [more inside]
posted by memebake on May 31, 2010 - 50 comments

Geodata about China stays in China.

The Great Firewall just got a little taller. Starting next month, all geo data about China must be stored on servers inside China. This is much more that a snub of Google for moving its data out of the mainland, it is a power play aimed at controlling a type of data about which China is very sensitive, as shown in recent border disputes, and the discovery of secret military installations. [more inside]
posted by CheeseDigestsAll on May 21, 2010 - 25 comments

"They actually envied those who could take a leave due to work injury, while casually joking about how their station's been toxicated."

A (translated) Chinese report on life as a factory worker at Foxconn, the company that manufactures iPhones and other gadgets. Each employee would sign a "voluntary overtime affidavit," in order to waive the 36-hour legal limit on your monthly overtime hours. This isn't a bad thing, though, as many workers think that only factories that offer more overtime are "good factories," because "without overtime, you can hardly make a living."
posted by ignignokt on May 19, 2010 - 127 comments

Mystery and Tragedy in China

A recent spate of school attacks in China has left at least 17 people, mostly children, dead. The latest rampage resulted in the deaths of seven children and two adults. Two of the attackers have committed suicide, and a third was executed. All the attackers have been male, although a woman was detained for coming into a youth center with a knife. There is a news blackout in force "in an attempt to prevent more copycat killings." (audio story)
posted by stoneweaver on May 13, 2010 - 45 comments

China is the new Dubai

China is the new Dubai (when it comes to architecture)
posted by SamsFoster on May 9, 2010 - 14 comments

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