Join 3,512 readers in helping fund MetaFilter (Hide)

653 posts tagged with Cinema. (View popular tags)
Displaying 351 through 400 of 653. Subscribe:

Related tags:
+ (456)
+ (298)
+ (134)
+ (91)
+ (38)
+ (35)
+ (34)
+ (29)
+ (27)
+ (27)
+ (22)
+ (20)
+ (20)
+ (19)
+ (19)
+ (18)
+ (18)
+ (18)
+ (17)
+ (16)
+ (16)
+ (15)
+ (15)
+ (13)
+ (13)
+ (13)
+ (12)
+ (12)
+ (12)
+ (12)
+ (12)
+ (11)
+ (11)
+ (11)
+ (9)
+ (9)
+ (9)
+ (9)
+ (9)
+ (9)
+ (9)
+ (9)
+ (8)
+ (8)
+ (8)
+ (8)
+ (8)
+ (8)
+ (8)
+ (8)
+ (8)
+ (8)
+ (8)
+ (8)
+ (7)
+ (7)
+ (7)
+ (7)
+ (7)
+ (7)


Users that often use this tag:
Trurl (58)
AlonzoMosleyFBI (50)
matteo (43)
The Whelk (30)
fearfulsymmetry (23)
Egg Shen (14)
brundlefly (13)
growabrain (11)
reenum (9)
alexoscar (9)
EXISTENZ IS PAUSED (9)
Joe Beese (8)
Chinese Jet Pilot (7)
infini (6)
Artw (6)
jrb223 (6)
timshel (5)
dhammond (5)
Blazecock Pileon (5)
Ambrosia Voyeur (5)
flapjax at midnite (4)
sciurus (4)
bubukaba (4)
misteraitch (4)
MiguelCardoso (3)
KevinSkomsvold (3)
jack_mo (3)
jonp72 (3)
Paragon (3)
Brandon Blatcher (3)
acb (3)
vronsky (3)
miss lynnster (3)
goodnewsfortheinsane (3)
feelinglistless (3)
philip-random (3)
filthy light thief (3)
colinmarshall (3)
Rory Marinich (3)
puny human (3)
oulipian (2)
Fizz (2)
ocherdraco (2)
Rhaomi (2)
muggsy1079 (2)
Horace Rumpole (2)
Mintyblonde (2)
Iridic (2)
darkripper (2)
modernnomad (2)
phaedon (2)
PenguinBukkake (2)
funambulist (2)
squalor (2)
BlackLeotardFront (2)
elgilito (2)
tellurian (2)
adamvasco (2)
zarq (2)
Kattullus (2)

Spliced

Moviebarcode
posted by fearfulsymmetry on Feb 26, 2011 - 56 comments

Silent Strawberries

Silent Strawberries. The Muppets' tribute to Ingmar Bergman, with translation by Sam the Eagle. That is all. [SLYT]
posted by .kobayashi. on Feb 26, 2011 - 19 comments

"Threads" and "Testament"

Threads (1984). (1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13) Testament (1983). (1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7) [more inside]
posted by Joe Beese on Feb 25, 2011 - 66 comments

FADE IN

IFC News presents film's 50 Greatest Opening Title Sequences of All Time - Start here, or all 50 on one page
posted by fearfulsymmetry on Feb 25, 2011 - 41 comments

Disaster Movies of the 1970s

Disaster movies are as old as cinema itself. But their golden age began in 1970 with Airport - which, despite being an Academy Award nominee for Best Picture, is now remembered chiefly for the parody it inspired. Earthquake - exhibited in Sensurround - set a record for the number of stunt performers used. But the Master of Disaster was Lost in Space producer Irwin Allen. His The Poseidon Adventure grossed the equivalent of $450 million in today's money. And The Towering Inferno - the filming of which destroyed all but 8 of its 57 sets - is still unsurpassed.
posted by Joe Beese on Feb 24, 2011 - 66 comments

Because you're not going to watch Cats And Dogs 2: Revenge Of Kitty Galore

Why watch a movie when you can just watch the titles? Browse title sequences by designer and read interesting backstory and discussion on the art of making a title sequence.
posted by The Whelk on Feb 20, 2011 - 6 comments

The King of the Deal

A New Yorker profile of consummate dealmaker Irving 'Swifty' Lazar. [more inside]
posted by reenum on Feb 9, 2011 - 9 comments

Baboon Holocaust!

CHUD.com presents "Horror 101". [more inside]
posted by brundlefly on Jan 31, 2011 - 10 comments

Slap Happy

Glove Actually: An Ode to Cinema's Greatest Slaps [7m10s]. (SLYT)
posted by hippybear on Jan 25, 2011 - 23 comments

25 Free John Wayne Westerns

25 Free John Wayne Westerns [via @brainpicker]
posted by brundlefly on Jan 24, 2011 - 22 comments

"Dark, small, stroby, headache inducing, alienating. And expensive."

Film editor and sound designer extraordinaire Walter Murch writes to Roger Ebert regarding a fundamental conundrum of current 3D technology: "It is like tapping your head and rubbing your stomach at the same time."
posted by oulipian on Jan 24, 2011 - 84 comments

"All have one thing in common - their delight in the taste of somebody's failure and it is here tonight."

The first 15 pages of Sam Peckinpah’s long-buried script for The Texans. Via CHUD.com
posted by brundlefly on Jan 20, 2011 - 8 comments

The Steadicam

The "Brown Stabilizer" - better known as a Steadicam - had its first commercial use 35 years ago in Bound for Glory, Hal Ashby's biopic of Woody Guthrie. Later that year, it was used to film the iconic shot of Rocky Balboa running up the steps of the Philadelphia Museum of Art. But it was this shot in The Shining - which even Kubrick-hater Pauline Kael deemed "spectacular" - that showed the technology's full potential. (previously)
posted by Joe Beese on Jan 16, 2011 - 41 comments

1. Let Me In

The scene of the year is a squirm-inducing stunner that manages to make us sympathize with a would-be murderer. [more inside]
posted by philip-random on Dec 31, 2010 - 54 comments

Around and around and around we go.

Anémic Cinéma is the only film that Marcel Duchamp is credited with directing.
It's a short, just over six minutes, and was made using rotoreliefs.
You can play with some here and here.
Optical illusions present images which are "true" but inconsistent.
Inconsistency, Anemic Cinema, and the Rotoreliefs - Michael Betancourt. (Duchamp previously 1; 2;)
posted by adamvasco on Dec 15, 2010 - 4 comments

"Serge Daney was the end of criticism as I understood it."

Serge Daney (1944 - 1992) is often cited as one of the greatest film critics. After joining the legendary film magazine Cahiers du cinéma (which he would eventually edit) at age 20, Daney wrote extensively on the changing place of movies in culture, on directors new and old and on television, war and even sports. He founded the film magazine Trafic before dying of AIDS in 1992.

Though some of his essays have been officially translated and a small book of his writings has been published in English, the vast majority of his work remains untranslated into English. That hasn't stopped a devoted group of cinephiles from taking matters into their own hands. [more inside]
posted by alexoscar on Dec 13, 2010 - 12 comments

Magnificent Obsession

The Magnificent Ambersons, Orson Welles' second film, has inspired a legend around the lost footage excised by the studio to make it more appealing to audiences. The film's making is a cautionary tale in letting the studio have creative control, and the finished product pained Welles to his dying day. The mythical status of the lost footage has inspired a few to try and track it down. [more inside]
posted by reenum on Dec 13, 2010 - 25 comments

Classified X

Melvin Van Peebles made a documentary called Classified X in 1998, about the portrayal of black people throughout the history of American cinema. You can see it on YT in six parts: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6. Apologies for the low video quality.
posted by Dim Siawns on Nov 30, 2010 - 19 comments

Cinema Code of Conduct

Cinema Code of Conduct as collated by Simon Mayo and Mark Kermode, as read out on the radio this afternoon.
posted by feelinglistless on Nov 19, 2010 - 37 comments

Luis Buñuel

Regarding Luis Buñuel (Criterion, 1:37, subtitled) "All my life I've been harassed by questions: Why is something this way and not another? How do you account for that? This rage to understand, to fill in the blanks, only makes life more banal. If we could only find the courage to leave our destiny to chance, to accept the fundamental mystery of our lives, then we might be closer to the sort of happiness that comes with innocence." -- Luis Bunuel, "In Curiosity" Bunuel wanted to rebel against the dogmatic structures of the Church that said, There is no salvation or grace outside the Church. He wanted a kind of Protestant surrealism in which grace was directly attainable like in Nazarin or Viridiana -- Carlos Fuentes "He is a deeply Christian man who hates God as only a Christian can and, of course, he's very Spanish. I see him as the most supremely religious director in the history of the movies." -- Orson Welles "I'd like to be able to rise from the dead every ten years, walk to a newsstand, and buy a few newspapers. I wouldn't ask for anything more. With my papers under my arm, pale, brushing against the walls, I'd return to the cemetery and read about the world's disasters before going back to sleep satisfied, in the calming refuge of the grave." -- Luis Bunuel
posted by puny human on Nov 16, 2010 - 23 comments

It's alive!

Frankenstein Film Stills, a Flickr set. [more inside]
posted by brundlefly on Nov 13, 2010 - 12 comments

If we don't, remember me.

Moments from classic films, in animated GIF form.
posted by zamboni on Nov 6, 2010 - 67 comments

India's Chuck Norris

He is a balding, middle-aged man with a paunch. "If a tiger had sex with a tornado and then their tiger-nado baby got married to an earthquake, their offspring would be Rajinikanth." [more inside]
posted by vidur on Sep 28, 2010 - 22 comments

Respect Dad's harp

Harpo's Place A tribute to Harpo Marx, by his son Bill.
posted by Paragon on Sep 11, 2010 - 48 comments

Moonshot

Q&A with Duncan Jones, the director of the recent Hugo winner Moon plus Gavin Rothery - concept designer and VFX supervisor, Barrett Heathcote - visual effects editor and Hideki Arichi - art director (MLYT) (1,2,3,4,5)
posted by fearfulsymmetry on Sep 10, 2010 - 30 comments

The geek stranglehold on cinema

Fawned over by the studios, the geek contingent has never been more influential in shaping movies. But are the fanboys in danger of killing the thing they love? The geek stranglehold on cinema.
posted by jonesor on Sep 5, 2010 - 113 comments

Don't open the elevator

Is the Trailer for 'The Shining' the Actual Film? [more inside]
posted by philip-random on Aug 19, 2010 - 136 comments

After Stanley Kubrick....

Christiane Kubrick is interviewed by Jon Ronson on the sad events of her life since her husbands death in 1999... After a triumplant screening of Paths of Glory in central London's Somerset House Christiane Kubrick speaks to Jon Ronson, the producer of the revelatory 'Stanley Kubrick's Boxes' documentary. Various Kubrick resources can be found on the web but one of the oldest, academicly themed resources can be found here. Previously on the blue here and here. If you are in or visiting London then the fantastic University Of The Arts archive is amazing. These developments make me sad but let's look forward.
posted by Mintyblonde on Aug 19, 2010 - 16 comments

A Soviet Space Odyssey

Road to the Stars (Doroga k Zvezdam, 1958) was a remarkable Soviet documentary about the future of space exploration, directed by the "Godfather of Star Wars" and still admired for its impressive miniature effects. Watch the entire film.
posted by Chinese Jet Pilot on Aug 18, 2010 - 7 comments

Obama: Episode I.

A new movie based on Obama’s childhood in Indonesia has just been released in Jakarta. The film is based on a novel released just this year. Certain differences can be noted between the book and the movie – for example, a scene showing Obama praying in the direction of Mecca was dropped.
posted by micketymoc on Jul 1, 2010 - 23 comments

Mother isn't quite herself today.

The secrets of "Psycho's" shower scene. "In the course of my research, I read one allegation about the weeklong filming of the scene that both troubled and intrigued me, but none of the reference books I consulted elaborated on the assertion."
posted by Obscure Reference on Jun 26, 2010 - 89 comments

Quality is the best business plan

Toy Story 3 hits theaters today, and it's already winning universal acclaim as an enchanting and heartbreaking wonderwork, employing understated 3D and a "real-time" perspective that deftly capitalizes on the nostalgia and can't-go-home-again angst of a generation that grew up with the series. It has a strong pedigree, with 11-year-old predecessor Toy Story 2 the rare sequel to equal its forebear, 1995's Toy Story (itself the first CGI feature in history). And it joins a lofty stable of films: over the last 15 years, Pixar has put out an unbroken chain of ten commercial and critical successes that have grossed over $5 billion worldwide and collected 24 Academy Awards (including the second-ever Best Picture nom for animation with Up), a legacy that rivals some of the greatest franchises in film history. But there's rumbling on the horizon. Although the studio has been hailed for its originality (of the 50 top-grossing movies in history, only nine were original stories -- and five of them were by Pixar), two of their upcoming projects are sequels, both of them based some of their least-acclaimed films (Cars 2 in 2011 and Monsters, Inc. 2 in 2012). And while 2012 will also bring The Bear and the Bow Brave, the first Pixar flick to feature a female protagonist [previously], fellow newcomer Newt has been canceled. With WALL-E/Up/Toy Story 3 guru Andrew Stanton focusing on his 2012 adaptation of John Carter of Mars and with forays into live-action already in development, does this mark the end of the golden age of Pixar? Or is this latest entry lasting proof that even the toughest case of sequelitis can be raised to the level of masterpiece? [more inside]
posted by Rhaomi on Jun 18, 2010 - 227 comments

1991 BBC Omnibus documentary on Peter Greenaway

Some kind soul recently uploaded, in five parts, a 1991 BBC Omnibus television documentary about Peter Greenaway, who never ceases to inspire me in his dedication to push film into new, richly interesting places, to liberate it from its addiction to stale 19th-century psychological narrative and to open it up to accept and incorporate all manner of artistic information it's usually denied. Cleverly titled Anatomy of a Filmmaker — Greenaway is an enthusiast of the nude human figure, which he sees as the single constant of art — it covers the filmmaker's career from his earliest shorts up through Prospero's Books. There are bits about the time he spent honing his skills cutting together British propaganda, his experience with painting and his longtime collaboration with Sacha Vierny. It also presents subsections on Greenaway's own inspirational creators, including John Cage and the increasingly-intriguing-to-me R.B. Kitaj.
posted by colinmarshall on Jun 14, 2010 - 16 comments

Shit just got real.

Pure by Jacob Bricca. A meditation on genre, a commentary on visual cliches, and a celebration of the visceral pleasures of cinema. Music by The Jesus Lizard. Please play full screen at top volume!
posted by lazaruslong on Jun 4, 2010 - 15 comments

The Manuscript Found in Saragossa

The Saragossa Manuscript is an unusual movie based on a strange book by a remarkable man. [more inside]
posted by misteraitch on Jun 2, 2010 - 15 comments

more is more when it comes to good movies

Yes as a matter of fact, 50,000 new films a year is a very good thing [more inside]
posted by philip-random on May 23, 2010 - 29 comments

Say hello to Salo?

Salo has been discussed before here in the blue, but last week the Australian Classification Review Board determined that the DVD release can be classified R18+ (available, but with sale restricted to adults), if it includes 3 hours of additional material proposed by the potential distributor, Shock. In the decision, the Board notes that the additional material "facilitates wider consideration of the context of the film." While this decision is a win for anti-censorship campaigners and film buffs, it may not be the final chapter. The film has had a checkered history in Australia. The Board's media release is here (PDF).
posted by Artaud on May 9, 2010 - 32 comments

Möchten Sie ein Bier?

In 1957, Peter Kubelka was hired to make a short commercial for Scwechater beer. (Previously)
posted by Minus215Cee on Apr 22, 2010 - 28 comments

Dede Allen, 1923-2010

Dede Allen, editor of such films as Bonnie and Clyde, Dog Day Afternoon and Night Moves has died at the age of 86.
posted by brundlefly on Apr 19, 2010 - 22 comments

3D conversion, artistic integrity and Michael Bay

Will post-conversion done badly kill 3D movies? Jeffrey Katzenberg of DreamWorks thinks it might. Or as Michael Bay puts it "You can’t just shit out a 3D movie".
posted by Artw on Apr 11, 2010 - 79 comments

colours of passion

Raja Ravi Varma (1848-1906), considered “the greatest painter of India,” “the father of modern Indian art,” and a “prince among painters and a painter among princes.” Varma became renowned both for his portraiture and his paintings of Indian mythology. The painter's life and times played a major role in the shaping of the women he painted and controversy over the way he painted them. Varma's images have not just survived, but due to his vision of making them accessible to the common man, they have thrived over a century and influence movies, television, the world's most expensive sari, theatre and everyday calender art.
posted by infini on Apr 10, 2010 - 7 comments

"It's a unicorn"

Five lines. That's how long the script handed to five different directors who made five vastly different short films from it for Philips Cinema was. The Gift has robots. Dark Room has assasins. El Secreto de Mateo has heart. Jun and the Hidden Skies has children's imagination. The Hunt has nature. [more inside]
posted by dabitch on Apr 7, 2010 - 7 comments

The Movie Title Stills Collection

The Movie Title Stills Collection [via] [more inside]
posted by brundlefly on Apr 7, 2010 - 5 comments

Pretty sure this is the most horrible idea for a film ever

I think that this is probably the most horrific premise for a film in recent memory. (SLYT)
posted by muggsy1079 on Apr 6, 2010 - 238 comments

"Plumbing. Can't beat it. Helps any movie."

I mean, in these days of indoor plumbing, the toilet is a naturally potent metaphor for everyday repression, for all the bile and rage and memories and sins and other impure thoughts and unclean urges that can't always kept down or flushed away. Every once in a while when the psychological plumbing gets clogged, the load of excrement becomes more than one's psychological pipes can handle, and the shit all comes bubbling back up from below and spews out onto the surface.
A survey of plumbing in the movies. Wee bit NSFW in both word and image.
posted by kipmanley on Mar 9, 2010 - 33 comments

Films of the 1930s

Great 1930s Movies on DVD (and a Few More That Should Be)
posted by jonp72 on Mar 5, 2010 - 23 comments

Alice in Wonderland (1903)

Alice in Wonderland (1903), directed by Cecil Hepworth and Percy Stow
posted by brundlefly on Feb 26, 2010 - 32 comments

Pier Paolo Pasolini's "Salò, or the 120 Days of Sodom"

Despite my absolute fidelity to Sade's text, I have however introduced an absolutely new element: the action instead of taking place in eighteenth-century France, takes place practically in our own time, in Salò, around 1944, to be exact. (some links extremely NSFW)
posted by Joe Beese on Feb 14, 2010 - 95 comments

Not THAT Kind of Black List

Patrick Sauriol's Corona Coming Attractions, the comprehensive insider film news site of the late-'90s (resurrected in December 2008), presents the top unproduced screenplays for 2009 as selected by film professionals (Part 1 | Part 2). "Over 300 film professionals were asked to submit the titles of up to ten of their favorite screenplays. The only condition for the picks were that the projects would not be released in theaters this year." Some sound fascinating, others cringe-inducingly tired.
posted by AugieAugustus on Feb 4, 2010 - 21 comments

Georges Méliès, the Cinemagician

He invented or popularized a startling array of the fundamental elements of film: the dissolve, the fade-in and fade-out, slow motion, fast motion, stop motion, double exposures and multiple exposures, miniatures, the in-camera matte, time-lapse photography, color film (albeit hand-painted), artificial film lighting, production sketches and storyboards, and the whole idea of narrative film.
By 1897, in a studio of his own design and construction – the first complete movie studio – his hand forged virtually everything on his screen. Norman McLaren writes, "He was not only his own producer, ideas man, script writer, but he was his own set-builder, scene painter, choreographer, deviser of mechanical contrivances, special effects man, costume designer, model maker, actor, multiple actor, editor and distributor." Also, his own cinematographer, and the inventor of cameras to suit his special conceptions. Not even auteur directors such as Charles Chaplin, Orson Welles, John Cassavetes, and Stanley Kubrick would personally author so many aspects of their films."
Inside: 57 films by Georges Méliès, the Grandfather of Visual Effects. [more inside]
posted by Paragon on Feb 3, 2010 - 31 comments

Page: 1 ... 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 ... 14