212 posts tagged with Cities.
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Metrocosm: The History of Cities Visualized

The History of Cities Visualized: Metrocosm
posted by y2karl on Jun 18, 2016 - 9 comments

A mere human shall not cast his miserable shadow upon great palaces.

“Where are all the people?” – this question often arises when people see photos of the white-marbled capital of Turkmenistan. Indeed, new Ashgabat looks empty. Huge new buildings lined with marble, wide avenues, parks, gardens, fountains are all there, but there are no people in the city. Ashgabat is divided into two parts – old town and new town. City of the living and the city of the dead.
Ashgabat: the city of the living and the city of the dead
posted by griphus on Jun 6, 2016 - 47 comments

Wacky Town Names

America's a big country. From the easternmost reaches of Maine to the western Alaska islands in the Bering Sea, these United States include towns with every imaginable name. We've collected some of the more surprising examples. Because it's the last day of May and we wanna keep MeFi weird. Add your own examples, let's go wild!
posted by Bella Donna on May 31, 2016 - 142 comments

Mayan constellations map to Mayan cities, helping find a new one

"During his research, Gadoury examined 22 Mayan constellations and discovered that if he projected those constellations onto a map, the shapes corresponded perfectly with the locations of 117 Mayan cities. Incredibly, the 15-year-old was the first person to establish this important correlation, reported the Journal de Montreal over the weekend. Then Gadoury took it one step further. He examined a twenty-third constellation which contained three stars, yet only two corresponded to known cities." [more inside]
posted by clawsoon on May 9, 2016 - 58 comments

Think your city doesn’t like you? You’re right

Hostile architecture, also known as defensive architecture, exists on a spectrum. At one end are the overt design features that are obvious to anyone walking by—like spikes and fences. At the other end, says Petty, are the design elements in which “the hostile function is often embedded under a socially palatable function.”
posted by veedubya on May 6, 2016 - 116 comments

The Savior of the Great American City

If New York City were Middle Earth, Sauron would doubtless be portrayed by Robert Moses, destroying neighborhood after neighborhood in his own endless quest for greater power and a lifeless personal vision of the city that had no thoughts of its inhabitants. But when he set his eyes on leveling SoHo and Little Italy for a ten-lane expressway across Lower Manhattan, he ran up against an unlikely Frodo. Jane Jacobs would have been 100 years old today.
posted by Navelgazer on May 4, 2016 - 9 comments

The geographies of loneliness (The Guardian - Cities)

"What's the world's loneliest city?" "Urban life is more stressful than rural life, but whether it’s lonelier is a point of debate among social scientists. A 2016 report by Age UK noted there are higher incidences of loneliness in cities, but precisely what brings it on is surprising. The same report found that gender and education are largely irrelevant – except for those with the highest level of education, who are often lonelier – and that household income and caring for a pet also have little effect."
posted by wallawallasweet on Apr 7, 2016 - 24 comments

The strange tale of a Cities: Skylines town with only one house

In Cities: Skylines ... it can be hard to keep tabs on a single person's life for very long, and difficult to find them again later. I thought I'd fix this problem by creating a city in which only a single home could be built. Then I'd see who moved in and keep track of their lives. Here's what happened.
[more inside] posted by cthuljew on Nov 16, 2015 - 56 comments

The race

This week, the mayor of St. Paul, Minnesota and a local Black Lives Matters group came to an agreement to prevent the disruption of this Sunday's Twin Cities Marathon. [more inside]
posted by roomthreeseventeen on Oct 2, 2015 - 28 comments

An $18 grilled cheese sandwich?

"The way to kill a complex city is to chase out all the poor people – and their food" "When greed makes a place like New York, London or San Francisco unaffordable, the non-wealthy leave, and the city loses the smells and tastes that made it great." [SLGuardian]
posted by gucci mane on Oct 1, 2015 - 57 comments

Rose-coloured glasses about the charm of cities in the past?

In praise of dirty, sexy cities: the urban world according to Walter Benjamin (slGrauniad)
posted by Kitteh on Sep 21, 2015 - 16 comments

...oh my God! -- it’s full of pixels!

1.47 Gigapixel panorama of Barack Obama's 2009 Inaugural Address
4-Gigapixel panorama of the surface of Mars
34-Gigapixel panorama of Prague
152-Gigapixel panorama of Rio de Janiero taken from Sugarloaf
272-Gigapixel panorama of Shanghai
320-Gigapixel panorama of London
• Currently the largest: this 365-Gigapixel panorama of Mont Blanc. [story]
• GigaPan has a wide variety of panoramas in their gallery.
Blakeway Gigapixel specializes in sports stadiums in full attendance (where you can tag people you recognize) and National Parks sites like the Grand Canyon

posted by not_on_display on Jun 17, 2015 - 26 comments

Mixed Traffic

Originally proposed to American audiences in a 2011 video, Dutch-style Protected Intersections have recently gained traction in the US as an effective means to protect cyclists and pedestrians in busy intersections. Four such intersections are under construction in the US; a similar intersection opened in Canada last year; and more are certain to follow, as protected bike lanes become commonplace in American cities.
posted by schmod on Jun 4, 2015 - 52 comments

"He thought Nashville was the roughest"

On the Road Again: Mapping All the Cities in Willie Nelson's Songs
Over the course of his career—a five-decade ramblin' run that spans recordings as far back as 1962 and as recent as last year—Willie has written endlessly about his affection for (and occasional vexation with) cities across the land. These are all of those places. Well, a whole hell of a lot of them, anyway.
posted by Lexica on Mar 25, 2015 - 15 comments

And knew not until the flood came, and took them all away

What the collapse of ancient capitals can teach us about the cities of today — Warnings from history: Angkor was a thriving metropolis of 750,000 before a series of mega-monsoons made it unliveable. Can modern flood-threatened cities learn from its downfall?
posted by cenoxo on Feb 17, 2015 - 29 comments

CNTRL_F+"Race"=0 Results

Citylab on the new data tool PlaceILive: "While PlaceILive is obviously a more serious endeavor than some of those awful "ghetto-tracker" neighborhood apps we've written about before, (previously) the site does wcore areas with high poverty rates and low educational attainment levels lower on its Life Quality Index score.

"We just genuinely believe that if there are more educated people, it is a nicer neighborhood, and the same with income," Legeckas says.

That may not necessarily be true, but it points to a broader problem with statistics-driven quality-of-life measures—one that Legeckas acknowledges: numbers can be deceiving."
posted by Potomac Avenue on Feb 13, 2015 - 32 comments

"in the old-world timber beam there may be lurking some treacherous knot

Michael Green, a Canadian architect responsible for the Wood Innovation and Design Centre at UNBC presents The Case For Tall Wood Buildings [PDF]. He also gave a TED Talk: Why We Should Build Wooden Skyscrapers (transcript) [more inside]
posted by the man of twists and turns on Jan 17, 2015 - 62 comments

"Walking around a city will never be the same"

We want our tools to sing of not just productivity but of our love of curiosity, the joy of wonderment, and the freshness of the unknown. —Eric Paulos, “Manifesto of Open Disruption and Participation
In his essay “Walking in the City,” the French scholar Michel de Certeau talks about the “invisible identities of the visible.” He is talking specifically about the memories and personal narratives associated with a location. Until recently, this information was only accessible one-to-one—that is, by talking to people who had knowledge of a place. But what if that data became one-to-many, or even many-to-many, and easily accessible via some sort of street-level interface that could be accessed manually, or wirelessly using a smartphone?
[more inside] posted by the man of twists and turns on Dec 16, 2014 - 28 comments

An Atlas Of Hyperreal Cities And Where To Find Them

On Umberto Eco's latest book of imaginary maps to legendary lands.
posted by The Whelk on Nov 12, 2014 - 11 comments

Life in Timbuktu

Life in Timbuktu: how the ancient city of gold is slowly turning to dust
(a long-form article from the Guardian with an accompanying photo gallery)

posted by tykky on Sep 25, 2014 - 14 comments

traditional urbanism

A Traditional City Primer [more inside]
posted by flex on Jul 30, 2014 - 23 comments

Piety and Perversity: The Palms of Los Angeles

Parisians claim that in Paris, one is never more than 400 yards away from a Metro station. In Los Angeles, I am equally certain that one is always within 400 yards of a palm tree. Scores of streets are lined with them; they are ubiquitous in domestic and public gardens; they rise from hilltops; they tower above cemeteries; they front museums, movie studios, hotels, hospitals, municipal buildings, modest apartments, and lavish villas; they are clustered around swimming pools; they dominate the skyline — they are everywhere, and have never been more popular. The city’s 200-year love affair with palms has never ceased, and rather than waning, the affair is waxing. From the first palms planted by Spanish padres to the city of Beverly Hills, which recently, in an act of cosmetic alteration, created a palm-lined, palm-bisected thoroughfare on upscale Rodeo Drive, the palm has been the tree of choice for Angelenos. [more inside]
posted by whyareyouatriangle on Jul 28, 2014 - 38 comments

You are here.

You Are Here maps out neat things like the best mode of transportation in your city, incidences of illness at New York City hospitals, permanent US visa applications and street greenery.
posted by roomthreeseventeen on Jun 26, 2014 - 10 comments

The unparalleled delights of escaping notice

"Maybe I am extra aware of it because I am currently visiting with my parents, and they have a tendency to shout to each other between floors, and I have a tendency to regress, and suddenly, just as when I was a teenager, all I want is to have some space of my own, where I can read, and think, in private."
posted by holmesian on Apr 24, 2014 - 30 comments

Detroit: Then & Now

The latest project of detroiturbex.com is Detroit: The Evolution of a City, showing incredible then and now photographs with a sliding interface, so you can see the changes (good and bad) across the decades. It's broken up into five sections: A Growing City, Deindustrialization, Unrest, Decay, and Revival. Previously from detroiturbex: Cass Tech superimposed photos. [more inside]
posted by wikipedia brown boy detective on Apr 1, 2014 - 11 comments

"If you want to kill someone, do it with a car."

"In 2012, automobile collisions killed more than 34,000 Americans, but unlike our response to foreign wars, the AIDS crisis, or terrorist attacks—all of which inflict fewer fatalities than cars—there’s no widespread public protest or giant memorial to the dead. We fret about drugs and gun safety, but don’t teach children to treat cars as the loaded weapons they are."
posted by DoctorFedora on Mar 12, 2014 - 235 comments

Judgmental maps

Judgmental maps of cities/areas including Los Angeles (featuring “botoxed cougars in luxury condos”), Northern Virginia (including “closeted Hispanic husbands”), Richmond, VA (where one finds the “scary Walmart”), Memphis (where there are “people proud, yet ashamed, to be from Memphis"), Chattanooga (see “rich white people & gnomes”), Nashville (one part is “gentrified to a great level of inconvenience”), Phoenix, San Antonio, and “Canada, prolly.”
posted by goofyfoot on Mar 5, 2014 - 115 comments

Should we talk about the weather?

Pronbably to no one's surprise, Southern California leads the nation in the number of pleasant days per year (mean temperature between 55° F and 75° F, no precipitation). How does your city stack up?
posted by Horace Rumpole on Feb 15, 2014 - 86 comments

Planning Love

V-Day cards for planners, architects, urban designers, landscape architects, transportation engineers, and those who love them.
posted by parudox on Feb 14, 2014 - 15 comments

A Map of Hip America

What is the Williamsburg of your city? [SLGawker]
posted by Rock Steady on Jan 31, 2014 - 148 comments

Healthy cities: public health and urban planning

A new Report on the State of Health + Urbanism (pdf) from MIT looks at the relationship between urban planning and public health, with some surprising findings. The cities covered are Atlanta, Boston, Chicago, Houston, Minneapolis, New York, Los Angeles, and San Francisco. [more inside]
posted by gingerbeer on Dec 31, 2013 - 52 comments

Amsterdam pays alcoholics in beer to clean streets

The day begins at around 9:00 am, with the workers drinking two beers and some coffee, if desired, before going to clean the streets.
posted by hereticfig on Nov 22, 2013 - 51 comments

Ripe For The Picking

Ask A Native New Yorker: How Guilty Should I Feel About Being A Horrible Gentrifier? Passionate response from a Bushwick native.
posted by The Whelk on Sep 27, 2013 - 205 comments

How to Design a City for Women

In 1999, officials in Vienna, Austria, asked residents of the city's ninth district how often and why they used public transportation. "Most of the men filled out the questionnaire in less than five minutes," says Ursula Bauer, one of the city administrators tasked with carrying out the survey. "But the women couldn't stop writing."
posted by cthuljew on Sep 21, 2013 - 38 comments

Ipsos Global City Rankings 2013

British market-research firm Ipsos Mori has released the results of "The largest ever global study of the best city to do business in, live in, and visit." Interactive data here, more info here.
posted by Navelgazer on Sep 8, 2013 - 21 comments

Be sure to zoom out....

Buildings in the Netherlands by year of construction is a map worth getting lost in.
posted by oulipian on Sep 1, 2013 - 19 comments

Radiation! Violent protests! Spaniards! Welcome to 2020.

IS ☻ JAPAN COOL?! The International Olympic Committee votes in 15 days on whether Tokyo, Istanbul or Madrid will host the 2020 Summer Olympics and Paralympics, and major efforts are underway to cajole the committee. Promotional videos have been released, royalty, major sports figures, and robotic cats have been dragged out. A few nasty remarks have been flung, which were subsequently dismissed. Meanwhile, activists, petitioners, protesters, and economic instability are potentially hurting the Olympic bids in Madrid, Istanbul, and Tokyo, Turkey has experienced a major doping scandal, and radiation continues to leak from Fukushima. And what would the Olympics be without a logo design failure?!
posted by markkraft on Aug 26, 2013 - 73 comments

A mystery or a memory

The Mystery of Flying Kicks.
posted by cashman on Aug 23, 2013 - 6 comments

Questions. Morbidity. Incept dates.

Detroit, New Orleans, Oakland... some of the safer places in America to live! Sure, big cities might have more murders per capita... but residents in large cities are *MUCH* safer when it comes to injury deaths than those living in more rural parts of America, according to a new study in The Annals of Emergency Medicine.
"Cars, guns and drugs are the unholy trinity causing the majority of injury deaths . . . Although the risk of homicide is higher in big cities, the risk of unintentional injury death is 40 percent higher in the most rural areas than in the most urban. And overall, the rate of unintentional injury dwarfs the risk of homicide, with the rate of unintentional injury more than 15 times that of homicide among the entire population."
posted by markkraft on Jul 25, 2013 - 71 comments

EmPHAsis on the right sylLABle

How to pronounce Chicago street names. How to pronounce London street names. How to pronounce Austin street names. How to pronounce New Orleans street names (and a whole lot else). How to pronounce "Spuyten Duyvil," "Kosciuszko" and "Goethals." How to pronounce "Van Nuys," "Sepulveda," "San Pedro," and "Los Angeles." [more inside]
posted by Iridic on Jun 28, 2013 - 120 comments

The Moon Doesn't Have A Bed, Bath and Beyond... Yet

Samuel Aston Williams shows maps of the spread of urban sprawl in several American and international cities over 30 years, as seen from space.
posted by reenum on Jun 25, 2013 - 36 comments

The Modern Moloch

Jaywalking, in time and space
posted by eotvos on May 9, 2013 - 8 comments

Mapping transit inequality

Dan Grover and Mike Belfrage have mapped transit inequality in the Bay Area after reading a New Yorker piece on the New York City subway (previously). The ways in which a widening income gap are changing the demography of San Francisco have been widely reported of late (previously, previously). The project's code is available if you'd like to try mapping your own city.
posted by liketitanic on May 8, 2013 - 25 comments

Cities Of The Future

Cities Of The Future, Built By Drones, Bacteria, And 3-D Printers. [Via]
posted by homunculus on May 2, 2013 - 21 comments

FPP below this line _____

Following a 1976 pipeline explosion that left nine people dead, cities adopted the color-coded spray paint DigAlert system to mark the presence of various kinds of buried municipal infrastructure. If you've ever wondered what those marks on the ground mean, the Design Decoded blog breaks it down for you. (The previous entry in their Decoding the City series explained the Fire Diamond.)
posted by Horace Rumpole on Apr 28, 2013 - 25 comments

Class-Divided Cities

Beginning with New York and wending its way through to Detroit, The Atlantic Cities has just completed a series of posts exploring geographic class divisions in a dozen cities (actually metro areas) in the U.S., with help from American Community Survey data. [more inside]
posted by psoas on Apr 10, 2013 - 53 comments

It's the capital of the world, but is it still the capital of the UK?

BBC Economics Editor Stephanie Flanders asks "Should Britain let go of London?"
posted by nickrussell on Mar 26, 2013 - 82 comments

sea & sky

seaQuest: what if we could learn to live on/underneath the oceans (or in orbit)? [previously(er)] [more inside]
posted by kliuless on Mar 18, 2013 - 14 comments

The trolleybus era

More than just pictures of electric Brill, Flyer and Pullman buses, trolleybuses.net has some great old street-level shots of many cities in North America.
posted by Pruitt-Igoe on Mar 5, 2013 - 16 comments

"The vigilante myth at its most naked and vicious"

"In its original form, Double Dragon is, if nothing else, a game in which Lynyrd Skynyrd fights to rescue America from The Ramones, The Village People, and Grandmaster Flash." - Dan Whitehead of the Gameological Society on Double Dragon and how gaming reflects a culture's changing relationship with the urban landscape.
posted by EatTheWeak on Feb 21, 2013 - 56 comments

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