1680 posts tagged with Comics.
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Like a famous painting, a rare comic is hard to fence.

Comic Con Man: A true crime tale of comic books, corruption, and a $9 million vanishing act
posted by Horace Rumpole on Jul 25, 2015 - 6 comments

“This is not so much a radical change as a return.”

Has geek culture finally embraced gender parity? [SLGuardian] [more inside]
posted by joseph conrad is fully awesome on Jul 25, 2015 - 40 comments

Comicbook confidential

The State of Comic Book Retail - David Harper's latest comics industry survey shows bricks and mortar comic stores to be in a surprising period of opportunity and change. But are there now too many comics?
posted by Artw on Jul 21, 2015 - 11 comments

*excited horse noises*

Horse Wife: Professional Hugger, Full Time Homemaker, Literal Horse.
posted by Drinky Die on Jul 21, 2015 - 37 comments

it is straight, and it is hard

Ruler Comics and other small and wonderful comics by alabaster. [more inside]
posted by moonmilk on Jul 14, 2015 - 5 comments

white privilege, white audacity, white priorities: Strange Fruit #1

J. A. Micheline on The White Privilege, White Audacity, and White Priorities of STRANGE FRUIT #1:
I was hardly surprised to find that for every white person who says something racist, there is always either (a) a white person to tell the other white person that they're wrong or (b) a black person to say nothing and show no resistance. (b) happens only once, while (a) happens pretty much throughout the work. It's a perspective common to stories of racism written by whites — in order to make white audiences comfortable, white creators (of any medium) frequently show that "not all whites" were pro-slavery or racist. It is simply inconceivable to write a story in which every white person is racist, because, in their minds, how could that possibly be true? You set the Klan up, the obvious racists, just to knock them down with white saviors, to remind readers/audiences that whites are still good people and knew better and wanted to help.
[more inside]
posted by divined by radio on Jul 14, 2015 - 156 comments

pear pimples for hairy fishnuts

Twenty-five years after the strip was purchased by Donald Trump and the staff fired, Bloom County will return. [more inside]
posted by Countess Elena on Jul 12, 2015 - 166 comments

Be terrifying.

Vanity Fair profiles Kelly Sue DeConnick, writer of the comics Captain Marvel, Pretty Deadly, and Bitch Planet.
posted by Stacey on Jul 9, 2015 - 44 comments

“street-level, real-world kinds of stories.”

In Hawkeye, narrative strategies like the in media res opening, the flashbacks, and the flashforwards are complimented by Fraction and Aja’s use of motifs to thicken individual issues and stories. In #3, two different lists—the “nine terrible ideas” Clint has on the day the story takes place (featured in first-person captions), and a catalog of the trick arrows in Clint’s quiver (featured in inset panels with labels like “Explosive-tip Arrow”)—offer running commentaries on the dominant story. Sometimes Hawkeye’s echoes and callbacks can be very on-the-nose, as in the small panels of Clint praising his boomerang arrow that appear early and late in the story.
For The Comics Journal, Craig Fischer examines Matt Fraction/David Aja's Hawkeye. Warning: spoilers.
posted by MartinWisse on Jul 5, 2015 - 25 comments

What do you dream about?

Night Physics is a webcomic (currently updating bi-monthly) on tumblr that is sometimes about anthropomorphic animals in a "tough-but-doomed little mountain town somewhere in the American Midwest" being asked what they dream about, and sometimes about some friends living in that town "as they try to navigate relationships, sexual ethics, suburban legends, ancient myths, haunted houses, and psychedelic wastelands--often all at the same time." The story begins when two friends consume exactly too much of a new drug and have revelatory visions about their lives - and afterward, one can't seem to stop having them.
posted by BiggerJ on Jul 2, 2015 - 14 comments

Hobbes was a manifestation of pure, unadulterated loneliness.

Calvin And Hobbes embodied the voice of the lonely child. Calvin made it okay to be disheartened and disappointed by life and normalized the inherent loneliness that childhood can bring. [more inside]
posted by meowzilla on Jun 9, 2015 - 58 comments

Whose heroes are these? Not mine.

Cyborg isn’t just an emasculated man, but an emasculated black man, and as one of comics’ higher profile black superheroes — starring in his own movie in distant 2020 — the unspoken fact of his castration is demeaning. The racist narrative of black man as sexual threat is served by the idea of a character who is rendered heroic in the same event that symbolically renders him sexually unthreatening. (Genitals do not define gender or sexual power, but they are often tied to an individual’s relationship with their sexual, gender, and cultural identities.) The Re-Masculation of Cyborg asserts that DC Comics may be correcting the problems that blogger Robert Jones Jr. identified in his essay Humanity Not Included: DC’s Cyborg and the Mechanization of the Black Body.
posted by Charlemagne In Sweatpants on Jun 3, 2015 - 31 comments

♫ "Is he strong? Listen bud, he’s got radioactive blood." ♪

"The Secret History of Ultimate Marvel, the Experiment That Changed Superheroes Forever"
posted by zarq on May 27, 2015 - 113 comments

Hollywood has only produced exceptions by accident

Hollywood & the 'Comic-Book Movie' and part 2
posted by shakespeherian on May 24, 2015 - 22 comments

This is Richard. His parents are doing OK.

A pretty great comic that clearly lays out how (some) privilege works.
posted by Shepherd on May 23, 2015 - 57 comments

An Entire Stable of Characters in One Issue

Wham-O (previously) revolutionized the circle, the torus and the sphere, but they once did something innovative with the humble rectangle: Wham-O Giant Comics (alternate ad here), intended to be a quarterly magazine but ultimately the only issue released by the company. You can read it in its entirety here and read critiques of its contents here. It's an anthology whose contents run the gamut of genres, so if you don't like a story, you can just skip to the next. Of particular note are Radian and Goody Bumpkin, drawn by Wally Wood (previouslies).
posted by BiggerJ on May 22, 2015 - 13 comments

I'm the Fastest Man Alive

On Tuesday, the first season finale of CW network's The Flash aired. Can't wait 'til next Fall for your Flash fix? There's always the grittier 1990 series, which ran for a single season. [more inside]
posted by zarq on May 21, 2015 - 40 comments

#DiversifyAgentCarter

The Mission: Agent Carter, Diversity in Superhero TV, and a Colorful History - Joseph Phillip Illidge at Comic Book Resources [more inside]
posted by joseph conrad is fully awesome on May 11, 2015 - 34 comments

Women in Science Fiction & Fantasy Month, 2015

Every April for the past several years, Fantasy Cafe has published a series of guest posts for Women in Science Fiction & Fantasy Month. This year, the article that generated the most discussion was "'I am ... ?': Representation of Mature Women in Fantasy" by Mieneke from A Fantastical Librarian, who asked, "So where are the older women in fantasy? Mature women who are the hero of their own story?" The many other guest posts this year offered an interesting range of questions, observations, and reflections--often by well-known names in the field. [more inside]
posted by Monsieur Caution on May 3, 2015 - 22 comments

"I don't know but I really want one!"

The Amazing New Thing by Tom Gauld [New York Times] [Magazine]
posted by Fizz on May 1, 2015 - 20 comments

Clowes Encounter - A conversation with cartoonist Daniel Clowes

Clowes Encounter: an extended interview with Ghost World and Eightball writer/illustrator Daniel Clowes. [more inside]
posted by Ufez Jones on Apr 30, 2015 - 5 comments

Yup, Frank Miller goes Full Godwin on Superman

Holy fascist retrograde, Batman! DC Comics announces "The Dark Knight Rises: The Master Race". Because the comics universe apparently needs to have karmic balance for the progress of Bobby Drake (Previously on Mefi), which is why DC is making yet another Miller/Azzarello The Dark Knight comic book. Frank Miller, author of The Dark Knight, Sin City, The 300, and Holy Terror! shall once more be working with Brian Azzarello (100 Bullets, Wonder Woman). Various reactions at Polygon and at io9.
posted by LeRoienJaune on Apr 24, 2015 - 84 comments

The Iceman Cometh Out

Scans leaked from next week's issue of the Marvel Comic All-New X-Men have revealed that original member Bobby "Iceman" Drake is gay. While the character has been written as straight for the past fifty years, some readers have read otherwise between the panels. Director Brian Singer sees parallels in the movies. [more inside]
posted by ChurchHatesTucker on Apr 24, 2015 - 143 comments

DC Super Hero Girls

DC is partnering with Mattel, Lego, Random House and others to launch DC Super Hero Girls universe for girls. Here's seven things CBR hopes they can acheive.
posted by Artw on Apr 23, 2015 - 32 comments

Archie Andrews' 75th birthday

As Archie Andrews turns 75, Archie Comics releases a "new look" flagship series, Archie #1. Archie #1 will be released in 2015 from writer Mark Waid, known for his work for DC and Marvel comics, and artist Fiona Staples. The series will "reenergize the story of Archie and his friends, presenting for the first time ever the origins of everyone’s favorite redheaded teen and his friends while showcasing the beginnings of the historic love triangle between Archie, Betty and Veronica". [more inside]
posted by Ziggy500 on Apr 20, 2015 - 62 comments

Who is ruining comics this week?

And I find it amusing that this “they’re fans of MOMENTS but won’t buy anything” complaint was being made at fans who were at a comic convention. Look, cons ain’t cheap. If someone’s spending their time and money to go to a con or make their own Captain Marvel costume or whatever, they clearly have some kind of passion and fondness for what they’re seeing. No one goes to a con just because they reblogged Unbeatable Squirrel Girl a couple times.
Is Tumblr fandom ruining comics because Tumblr fans "love the characters and love MOMENTS of stories, but don’t read the actual comics ever"? The answer may not surprise you.
posted by MartinWisse on Apr 20, 2015 - 85 comments

The least favorite Avenger

Comic-Book Writer Nick Spencer talks about writing the print version of Ant-Man as Marvel releases a second trailer for the movie and Vulture looks at the film's long production history.
posted by Brandon Blatcher on Apr 17, 2015 - 93 comments

"Somebody called on the... PHONE!"

MODERN HORROR TALES - It's from Mefi's own The Whelk aka John Leavitt. [via mefi projects]
posted by joseph conrad is fully awesome on Apr 16, 2015 - 25 comments

Oh, Now I Get It

In 1995, Zippy was explained. In 2001, Jerkcity (contains NSFW dialogue and extremely occasional NSFW imagery) was explained. And now, in 2015, Pokey the Penguin is finally explained. You know, probably. (Click the cover of The Pokey Principle to begin reading.)
posted by BiggerJ on Apr 15, 2015 - 23 comments

From Kitty to Kamala

The Journey That Turned Ms Marvel into This Generation’s Hero
posted by Artw on Apr 10, 2015 - 24 comments

The crossovers that dare not speak their name

Do you dig Marvel and DC? At the same time? Only one man dared imagine.... that and more. [more inside]
posted by Mezentian on Apr 10, 2015 - 54 comments

"the entire universe is now aware of her awesomeness"

"There are many ways we can envision women's liberation if we try. Since we total more than half of the world's population, our experiences as women intersect with almost every other struggle against systemic oppression. The lessons learned are personal and political. Tapping into this well can sometimes seem like an infinite journey: where does one start? Well, with comics, of course!" 19 Comic Characters Who Embody Women's Liberation, Ad Astra Comix [more inside]
posted by joseph conrad is fully awesome on Apr 4, 2015 - 12 comments

"Entertainment is a business, no matter what it means to us"

"The Boys, in many ways, is about how to kill the unkillableand unsurprisingly, an analogue for Superman is at the center of the story. But Superman, I can see them killing. Kryptonite, magic, red sun radiation, just being bigger and tougher, or just realizing that he is one man who can be in one place at one time, and can be managed. There are enough stories about Superman getting killed that we know it’s possible. But Superman’s owners? Not the culture that he’s part of, but the Warner Brothers Corporation that claims him as IP? That dodges through legal maneuvers and drags out court cases, that intimidates and strongarms, all in the name of securing the brand of Superman even as they could care less what Superman stands for as a character?" A lengthy meditation on The Boys, the ultraviolent, ultratransgressive and problematic-but-still-fascinating superhero comics epic as written by Garth Ennis.
posted by mightygodking on Mar 31, 2015 - 39 comments

British Girls' Comics

Girls' Comics of Yesterday From the 1950s to the turn of the 21st century, generations of British girls enjoyed weekly comics full of text and picture stories, about an astonishing range of topics: ballerinas, aliens, ghosts, Victorian serving-girls, magic mirrors, wicked stepparents, boarding schools, horse riding, sci-fi dystopias, boys, plucky heroines solving mysteries, and really anything you could imagine ... although to be honest, there were a lot of ballerinas. [more inside]
posted by daisyk on Mar 30, 2015 - 15 comments

Whatever could Charlie Brown & Charlie Hebdo have to do with each other?

"The relationship between Charlie Brown and Charlie Mensuel was nevertheless an odd one. The first cover of Charlie Mensuel may have featured Snoopy snoozing on his doghouse, but by the second issue one could already sense the bawdy direction in which the magazine would be heading. Drawn by Al Capp, it features an orange seal, grinning. Look at it again, and you'll see that it doubles as a smiling phallus. The next two covers featured cartoons by Schulz—Linus with his security blanket, Charlie Brown with a valentine. But by the sixth cover, it was back to bawd: Wolinski, maker of many dirty pictures, drew the face of a smiling man with a tiny, scantily clad lady riding on his nose." (SLAtlantic)
posted by joseph conrad is fully awesome on Mar 21, 2015 - 10 comments

Lighten Up

Lighten Up (NSFW), a short comic about coloring and race in comics by Ronald Wimberly.
posted by dinty_moore on Mar 18, 2015 - 15 comments

You've got to be joking!

DC Comics pull cover of Batgirl menaced by Joker after online protests
In celebration of the 75th anniversary of The Joker, DC Comics is releasing variant covers in June, depicting their popular villain. After threats of violence and harassment the artist, Rafael Albuquerque, agreed to pull the cover. Who was being threatened and harassed? Not the artist. Rather, the people objecting. Predictably the backlash #CHANGETHECOVER has generated backlash #SAVETHECOVER in a standoff reminiscent of Gamergate.
posted by cjorgensen on Mar 17, 2015 - 126 comments

Biff! Pow! Zap! There are comics for kids once more

If we were to pick a Person Of The Year for 2014, I think it would be pretty obvious that it would have to be Raina Telgemeier who absolutely ruled the roost with the #1, 3 and 5th best-selling books ("Sisters," "Smile," and "Drama") through BookScan. And it is fairly certain that this is just the tip of the iceberg, as the New York Times reports that "Sisters" has printed more than 1.4 million copies so far, and it only came out in August of 2014!
Raina Telgemeier, who on her own is responsible for 3.6 percent of all book sales reported through Bookscan, isn't the only one making a success of comics aimed at kids: the majority of the top 20 bestselling graphic novels are aimed at kids, Brian Hibbs shows.
posted by MartinWisse on Mar 14, 2015 - 15 comments

still funk lord and queen after all

Groening and Barry Take New York (Sarah Larson, The New Yorker)
"In the early eighties, discovering non-mainstream culture (independent cinema, post-punk rock, comic strips that weren’t 'Beetle Bailey') was much like being a detective, and local alternative newsweeklies were valuable providers of clues. They reviewed art and music that was hard to find; most important, they printed Groening’s 'Life in Hell' and Barry’s 'Ernie Pook’s Comeek.' Both were electrifyingly good. You wondered who these people were, where they came from, why they did what they did. I remember the jolt I felt when looking at the copyright page of Groening’s book 'Love Is Hell' and seeing an odd message, like a note left in a knothole: LYNDA BARRY IS FUNK QUEEN OF THE GALAXY. Groening and Barry were friends!"

posted by joseph conrad is fully awesome on Mar 13, 2015 - 28 comments

Let's go exploring!

Bill Watterson, the famously reclusive creator of Calvin & Hobbes, has given his longest interview to date, to be published in the exhibition catalog for the Billy Ireland Cartoon Library & Museum's exhibit, Exploring Calvin & Hobbes.
posted by overeducated_alligator on Mar 12, 2015 - 28 comments

Graphic Journalism

The phone rang. It was my college rapist. (TW) "a comic account of my friend’s sexual assault in college. 33 years after the incident, she received a phone call from her assailant." [more inside]
posted by jillithd on Mar 10, 2015 - 50 comments

Shades of A, Shades After

Shades of A is a webcomic about asexual Muslim Anwar, his genderqueer best friend JD, and his tentative steps towards a relationship with his boyfriend Chris. Starting as Anwar and JD graduate from uni, Shades of A is about navigating personal identity, sex and relationships as a young adult in a complex world. [more inside]
posted by daisyk on Mar 9, 2015 - 9 comments

Knowledge is our Superpower

"Despite scant funding and resources, London’s Feminist Library is turning their 40th year into a celebration of storytelling, history – and, hopefully, sofas." Stephanie Boland at The New Statesman, 'She blinded me with library science': why the Feminist Library is more vital than ever. [more inside]
posted by joseph conrad is fully awesome on Mar 5, 2015 - 3 comments

Definitely-Not-Filthy Sailing Terminology

Confusing and obtuse it may be... ...but if there's one thing sailing terminology is not, it's filthy. -- Lucy Bellwood puts things straight through the medium of comics. Want more salty seadogging? Down to the Seas is the story of her trip onboard the last wooden whaling ship in the world.
posted by MartinWisse on Mar 5, 2015 - 14 comments

Is Charlie Brown the Worst Manager Ever?

Is Charlie Brown the Worst Manager Ever? Without box scores, we can’t measure Brown based on Pythag, and without statistics, we can’t even try to measure the team’s performance against its WAR, as Adam Darowski once suggested. We don’t even have an idea of the league’s playing environment, given that we know less about Brown’s rivals than even his own team. (It would seem, based on the pitches he’s seen to swing through, that most pitchers can throw harder than the batters can handle.) We can only broadly guess at Brown’s skills or habits as a tactician based on what little we know. Please consider the following science inexact. (via SpoFi)
posted by Ufez Jones on Mar 4, 2015 - 23 comments

The Uncanny X-Men

What if Wes Anderson directed an X-Men movie?
posted by Artw on Mar 4, 2015 - 25 comments

The long shadow of the Super Friends

Why Are People Still Surprised That Aquaman Is A Badass?
posted by Brandon Blatcher on Feb 24, 2015 - 64 comments

Leisuretown: The Lost Episodes

Leisuretown (probably NSFW) (previouslies), the webcomic created by Tristan A. Farnon (aka Spigot of Jerkcity), includes several 'flipbooks' that have been broken and unviewable on the site for some time. Working direct links to these lost stories have been discovered, including one that was slightly losterer than the others. (link to dickmissles's tumblr is also NSFW, due to large amounts of Jerkcity comics and fanart)
posted by BiggerJ on Feb 23, 2015 - 18 comments

Where do the dead belong, in the world of the living?

Todd McFarlane's Spawn aired on HBO from 1997-99. A faithful depiction of McFarlane's popular action-fantasy-horror comic, this groundbreaking, (NSFW,) animated series won an Emmy for 'Outstanding Animation Program' during its third and final season. [more inside]
posted by zarq on Feb 18, 2015 - 34 comments

miscarriage invisibility

a lost possibility: women on miscarriage (an open discussion on a topic that nobody talks about) [more inside]
posted by flex on Feb 18, 2015 - 51 comments

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