104 posts tagged with Comics and cartoons.
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Heaping Handfuls of -- No, No I'm Not Saying It

Among the lesser-known post-Milne works involving Winnie the Pooh is Disney's syndicated comic strip, running from '78 to '88 (following all but one of the theatrical featurettes, preceding the first animated series and beginning before the live-action Welcome to Pooh Corner). It is most well known for its characterizations, as seen in a series of examples aptly named Poohdickery. You can read much more of the comic starting here (earliest comic in archive with working image). And apropos of this post about online Russian movies, the beloved and brilliant Soviet adaptation, Vinni Puh (One, Two, Three Part 1, Three Part 2) (Wikipedia: One, Two, Three).
posted by BiggerJ on Aug 30, 2016 - 7 comments

Stop pretending and start eating people

Austin Light is back at it with TV Title Typos, illustrations of tv shows created from well known shows but with one letter missing from the title. (previously he did movie titles, which has been turned into a book!)
posted by numaner on Jun 3, 2016 - 149 comments

Apple today for Milk tomorrow

Don't bring your feelings to prison, son... They'll only wind up getting hurt. (SLImgur)

5FrogMargin relates a month spent in the Baldwin Alabama County Jail.
posted by endotoxin on May 22, 2016 - 7 comments


You know this guy? Yeah, him, with the art and the comics. Well, he successfully crowdfunded at least thirty cartoons, to be released weekly. Welcome (back) to the disquieting world of Joan Cornellà. (Warning: the various media contain nudity, violence, drug use and Jimbo the Jam.)
posted by BiggerJ on May 15, 2016 - 4 comments

Oh, Seattle! in comic form

Seattle alt-paper The Stranger carries comic-strip renditions of real police reports by Callan Berry. Recent pieces include: Man Throws Boasts (and Roasts) in Elevator, Woman Gets Cut in Line, Uses Peppery Language, and Man Gives Friend a Beer, Fight Ensues. Meanwhile, Real Change features MetroFareComic by Peter Orr, affectionate pieces based on real bus rider experiences, such as the overheard new lips prayer and misheard pothead genocide.
posted by splitpeasoup on Jan 30, 2016 - 31 comments


Comics and the Anthropological Imagination, from the Centre for Imaginative Ethnography. Solidarity: a graphic ethnography. At the food bank: a graphic commentary. Sketching the Melee. Trachyte - Mumbai. Drawing in Time. Tale of the Sarnia Nose .
posted by Rumple on Dec 12, 2015 - 2 comments

Is this some snobby, elitist, aesthetic thing?

Unlike Schulz, Watterson was unable to reconcile his creative ambitions with the lucrative opportunities that success had opened up. He was every bit Schulz’s artistic heir, but he had little interest in inheriting the fertile commercial landscape that Schulz had so carefully cultivated. Twenty-five years later, their disagreements come across as equal parts quaint and timely — a remnant from the last era when newspaper cartoonists commanded widespread readerships and profitable product lines, and an ageless meditation on what selling out and authenticity mean in a commercial art form. -- Luke Epplin in the LA Review of Books on Bill Watterson, "failed revolutionary".
posted by Potomac Avenue on Nov 19, 2015 - 93 comments

Terms & Conditions WILL Apply

Robert Sikoryak is turning the iTunes terms and conditions text into a beautiful graphic novel, a document full of mind-bending legalese that everyone agrees to without comprehension. A new page appears each day, in which our intrepid hero Steve Jobs dramatically imparts the otherwise soul-destroying passages in various scenes, rendered in the style of different cartoonists. [more inside]
posted by NordyneDefenceDynamics on Nov 3, 2015 - 25 comments

I can give you a tour. I think you look lovely tonight. I'm a gift.

Sophia Foster-Dimino is an illustrator and cartoonist.
Foster-Dimino’s ability to articulate very specific, very familiar, rarely articulated emotional sensations is uncanny here. (...) “Have you noticed that loving someone is like pouring water into a well,” asks the frenemy. “You don’t pour water into a well you get water out of a well,” protests the protagonist, now crying. “Your lover is a deep dark delicious well & you’re nothing but a bucket,” her tormenter responds without missing a beat. “Not even a cool bucket,” she continues, “a lackluster ordinary bucket—that feels so heavy but holds so little.” To be blunt, fuuuuuuuck.
[more inside] posted by glass origami robot on Aug 7, 2015 - 13 comments

"Somebody called on the... PHONE!"

MODERN HORROR TALES - It's from Mefi's own The Whelk aka John Leavitt. [via mefi projects]
posted by joseph conrad is fully awesome on Apr 16, 2015 - 25 comments

Whatever could Charlie Brown & Charlie Hebdo have to do with each other?

"The relationship between Charlie Brown and Charlie Mensuel was nevertheless an odd one. The first cover of Charlie Mensuel may have featured Snoopy snoozing on his doghouse, but by the second issue one could already sense the bawdy direction in which the magazine would be heading. Drawn by Al Capp, it features an orange seal, grinning. Look at it again, and you'll see that it doubles as a smiling phallus. The next two covers featured cartoons by Schulz—Linus with his security blanket, Charlie Brown with a valentine. But by the sixth cover, it was back to bawd: Wolinski, maker of many dirty pictures, drew the face of a smiling man with a tiny, scantily clad lady riding on his nose." (SLAtlantic)
posted by joseph conrad is fully awesome on Mar 21, 2015 - 10 comments

Enter Franklin

How Peanuts got its first black character. Come for an interesting back-and-forth between Charles Schulz and a reader. Stay for a jaw-dropping example of what another strip was doing at the same time.
posted by the phlegmatic king on Feb 13, 2015 - 74 comments

From Obocop to Lord of the Rigs

Inktober 2014: A daily ink drawing of Reddit's movie title typos. By Austin Light.
posted by MartinWisse on Nov 6, 2014 - 28 comments

You are not alone (trigger warning - sexual abuse)

[Trigger warning] 10 Things No One Ever Told You About Life After Sexual Abuse by Dr Nina Burrowes (Buzzfeed). Illustrations by Nina Burrowes, Katie Green, and Jade Sarson.
posted by joseph conrad is fully awesome on Nov 1, 2014 - 23 comments

A hundred years ago Europe was in the midst of the July Crisis.

The BBC will be covering World War One in great detail over the next four years. They've already started, with podcasts, interactive guides, online courses, programs new and old plus much, much more. Perhaps it's best to start at the beginning, with Professor Margaret MacMillan's Countdown to World War One (podcast link) or the account of her fellow historian Christopher Clark, Month of Madness. Of course, how the war started is still contested by historians, as recounted in The Great War of Words. The latter two are also part of the main WWI podcast. Or you can dive into the Music and Culture section, go through an A-Z guide or look at comics drawn by modern cartoonists.
posted by Kattullus on Jul 27, 2014 - 42 comments

What Kind of Pen Do You Use? Also, What Cartoon Character Would You Be?

David Wasting Paper queries 200+ illustrators, comic book, strip, gag, and editorial cartoonists on their trade, tools, favorite things, and more in his compulsively readable Cartoonist Survey(s) [more inside]
posted by Alvy Ampersand on Mar 9, 2014 - 3 comments

All the bees for my necklace of enemies

Morally ambiguous honey badgers, or what happens when creative people get bored on Twitter.
posted by MartinWisse on Feb 16, 2014 - 18 comments

An Observer's Guide To Pony Fanwork

How much My Little Pony: Friendship is Magic fan content is there out there? LET'S FIND OUT. A few highlights:
What I Learned Today, morals to episodes
Twilight adjusts to a Season 3 plot development
Apogee, random, catchy
Celestia and Luna play Resident Evil 4 (repurposed from Two Best Friends)
The best of Sweetie Bot, from Friendship is Witchcraft
Slice of Life, a very well done fan Tumblr
How much more could there be? Well.... [more inside]
posted by JHarris on Jan 23, 2014 - 126 comments

Tawdry Toons/Puerile Panels/Gags to Make You Gag

Much like its former publisher, the cover art for pornographic magazine SCREW could be described as “crude, rude, infantile, obnoxious, and dirty," as well as gross, misogynistic, and really NSFW. But it has also featured work from such terrific cartoonists as Tony Millionaire, Wally Wood, Spain Rodriguez, Renee French, and many others. Frequent contributor Danny Hellman presents SCREW: The Unofficial Cover Art Blog.
posted by Alvy Ampersand on Dec 16, 2013 - 9 comments


Cartoonist Mike Holmes draws himself (and his cat) in the style of other famous cartoonists/illustrators/animators. Examples: Maurice Sendak. Chris Ware. Rob Liefeld. Dr. Seuss's How The Grinch Stole Christmas.
posted by Greg Nog on Dec 14, 2013 - 70 comments

Podcast from Mike Duncan about revolutions

Revolutions is a new weekly podcast by Mike Duncan, who is best known for the History of Rome podcast, though he also writes comics. There are two episodes so far of Revolutions, a short introduction to the series and one on Charles Stuart, king of England.
posted by Kattullus on Sep 17, 2013 - 34 comments

The Only Woman Caricaturist

"Mary Williams adopted the name “Kate Carew” and wrote candid, witty interviews with luminaries of the day, including Mark Twain, Pablo Picasso, and the Wright Brothers. She adorned her interviews with her unique “Carewatures,” and often drew herself into the scene. Imagine Oprah Winfrey as a liberated woman caricaturist-interviewer in 1900 and you have an idea of who Kate Carew was. -- The Comics Journal's Paul Tumey rediscovers a cartooning pioneer in the course of a review of a new book about early US comics. [more inside]
posted by MartinWisse on Aug 31, 2013 - 4 comments

Drawing Inspiration

A look inside the cartoonist's sketchbook - Anders Nilsen, Jeffrey Brown, Kate Beaton, Rutu Modan, Chris Ware
posted by fearfulsymmetry on Aug 17, 2013 - 6 comments

World's Finest

DC has uploaded tons of DC Nation animated shorts to YouTube Including My Little Pony creator Lauren Faust's Super Best Friends Forever (previously). Not yet included: Robert Valley's super awesome 70s Wonder Woman.
posted by Artw on Jul 15, 2013 - 24 comments

"He’s also on PCP, FYI."

The Open Key: comics inspired by the endless stream of weirdness that is the Chicago Police and Fire scanner. (And if you prefer your scanner feed with evocative ambient music, You Are Listening to ___ has a new site.)
posted by theodolite on Jun 14, 2013 - 2 comments

Happiness is having your own library card

Do you like libraries? Do you like comics? Then Library Cartoons, Comics and Drawings is relevant to your interests. Need more? There's always Libraries in Pop Culture. Not satisfied yet? Unshelved is the internet's longest running librarian comic, previously featured for its pimped out bookcarts contest, but also worth visiting for the regular Friday bookclub.
posted by MartinWisse on May 28, 2013 - 5 comments

365 Days of the Black Hero

Last year, freelance cartoonist and illustrator Wardell "War" Brown drew a daily sketch of a different Black hero, both fictional and real life, starting with Storm and ending with Muhammad Ali. For those clever clogs who'd now like to point out 2012 was a leap year, he got you covered.
posted by MartinWisse on Feb 16, 2013 - 7 comments

Hamish Steele!

Hamish Steele! Be moved by his brief-yet-poignant award-winning animated film The Right Time. Be charmed by his commissioned portraits of couples and their pets. Be inspired by his loose and fresh superheroes (Batman, Phoenix, Hawkeye)! And it wouldn't be Tumblr without an appearance by Sherlock Holmes (not that one).
posted by overeducated_alligator on Nov 13, 2012 - 4 comments


The Economist on the decline of British boy's comics as The Dandy ceases print publication. As it circles oblivion it risks joining the ranks of Whizzer and Chips, Buster, The Beezer and subversive late entry to the genre Oink. The days of the Great British girl's comic are sadly long passed. 
posted by Artw on Aug 17, 2012 - 70 comments

Rosemary Mosco - naturalist & cartoonist

Rosemary Mosco is a field naturalist who draws bird & nature comics: "bird and moon" (previously), "ghosts of the northeast woods", "bird sound mnemonics", "birds are gross", "evolution sucks". Her bi-weekly comic strip Wild Toronto ("It cleverly observed and taught us about the animals and plants that live in our city") ran on Torontoist for some months in 2008; she has an illustrated collection of 55-word stories as well (previously mentioned). Her website, flickr, & tumblr.
posted by flex on Jun 15, 2012 - 12 comments

Wonder Woman means so much more to me than Hera or Aphrodite.

Comics author Grant Morrison talked to Playboy about the Super Psyches of some of his favorite superhero characters. (Clean interview, NSFW website)
posted by The Whelk on Apr 26, 2012 - 41 comments

Super Best Friends Forever

My Little Pony’s Lauren Faust on how Super Best Friends Forever will make you love Batgirl and Supergirl all over again. The short animations will be part of Cartoon Networks DC Nation block, alongside Beware The Batman, the replacement for the late lamented Batman: The Brave and the Bold.
posted by Artw on Feb 21, 2012 - 28 comments

"Be Gentle. It's My First Time."

Cartoonist and teacher James Sturm takes a crack at The New Yorker. Via [more inside]
posted by Alvy Ampersand on Aug 24, 2011 - 45 comments

Orange you glad you got your Nickelodeon?

Two and a half years ago, we explored the early history of Cartoon Network... but it wasn't the only player in the youth television game. As a matter of fact, Fred Seibert -- the man responsible for the most inventive projects discussed in that post -- first stretched his creative legs at the network's truly venerable forerunner: Nickelodeon. Founded as Pinwheel, a six-hour block on Warner Cable's innovative QUBE system, this humble channel struggled for years before Seibert's innovative branding work transformed it into a national icon and capstone of a media empire. Much has changed since then, from the mascots and game shows to the versatile orange "splat." But starting tonight in response to popular demand, the network is looking back with a summer programming block dedicated to the greatest hits of the 1990s, including Hey Arnold!, Rocko's Modern Life, The Adventures of Pete & Pete, The Ren & Stimpy Show, Double Dare, Are You Afraid of the Dark?, Legends of the Hidden Temple, and All That. To celebrate, look inside for the complete story of the early days of the network that incensed the religious right, brought doo-wop to television, and slimed a million fans -- the golden age of Nickelodeon. (warning: monster post inside) [more inside]
posted by Rhaomi on Jul 25, 2011 - 116 comments

Writing and drawing, that is your calling

Incidental Comics — Cartoons about... just stuff.
posted by netbros on Jun 9, 2011 - 9 comments

Hey Mick, who was that duck you were talking to?

An unfinished Donald Duck comic story, designed and roughed out with story complete, by Don Rosa! Written to promote the grand opening of Disney's MGM theme park, for one reason or another they dropped it before it could be completed. It's interesting because, in the comic book universe, Donald Duck isn't a movie star, but Mickey Mouse is -- so the duck seeks out his autograph. It even makes an explicit reference to a certain other duck....
posted by JHarris on May 20, 2011 - 18 comments

Galerie Ardulik

"The first Gallery dedicated to artists lying behind cinema, comics, video games masterpieces… and who creat [sic], to entertain, the most significant icons of our time." The gallery has previously featured exhibitions from webcomic artist Scott Campbell, H.R. Giger, propaganda-style Futurama posters, Superman penciller Tim Sale, sketches from Star Wars: The Clone Wars, and filmmaker Sylvain Chomet. [more inside]
posted by kagredon on Apr 30, 2011 - 5 comments

Sometimes even the wisest of men and machines can be in error.

Seibertron is billed as the Ultimate Transformers Resource. [more inside]
posted by chmmr on Feb 19, 2011 - 8 comments

The Bermuda Triangle of Productivity

The Bermuda Triangle of Productivity
posted by Tuesday After Lunch on Dec 31, 2010 - 39 comments

Garfield hates the troops

A comic strip has caused a political uproar by making a bold, controversial statement on Veteran's Day, considered by some to be an insult to our nation's fighting men and women. The strip that has spit on the work of our country's bravest veterans is, as you would expect, that anti-American bastion of subversive vitriolic societal commentary, Garfield.
posted by XQUZYPHYR on Nov 11, 2010 - 146 comments

An animated .gif of Wolverine snacking on a pizza, FOREVER.

Motion comics, why bother?
posted by Artw on Aug 9, 2010 - 47 comments

Jack Kirby’s Heroes in Waiting

During the 80s comics king Jack Kirby, co-creator of the Fantastic Four, the Hulk, the X-Men and Captain America, became disillusioned with the industry and left to work for animation company , sketching out dozens of characters, work that has been largely unseen... until now.
posted by Artw on Apr 13, 2010 - 43 comments

Happy Birthday, Ronald Searle!

The cartoonist Ronald Searle turns 90 today (March 3)! Hurrah for St. Trinians!.
The Cartoon Museum in London opens Searle's first-ever show in Britain. In this interview, Searle , at 90, recalls the bad girls of St Trinian's and his time as a prisoner-of-war and the abrupt leaving of his wife and children. Fleeing to France in 1961, he never returned. His archive was donated to the Willhelm Busch museum in Germany which is also holding a Searle exhibition.
posted by vacapinta on Mar 3, 2010 - 21 comments

Over 8000 Cartoons from Punch Magazine

Punch Cartoons has over 8000 cartoons from the pages of Punch, the long-running British satirical magazine. It cast its eye on everything from quintessentially British entertainment to children's books to computer games to optometrists. Punch ran from 1841 to 1992 and was relaunched in 1996 and finally closed shop in 2002. You can read up on the history of the magazine on their website and if you want to read some old issues to see what they were like, Project Gutenberg has quite a few. [Punch previously]
posted by Kattullus on Mar 2, 2010 - 19 comments

The Visual Telling of Stories

The Visual Telling of Stories
A lyrical encyclopedia of visual propositions;
a visually orientated taxonomy of the ways in which pictures are used to tell stories.
[more inside]
posted by carsonb on Feb 18, 2009 - 5 comments

Nora's freezin' on the trolley...

Yes, 'tis the season once again, and back in the day that meant the reappearance of the beloved Christmas carol in the comic pages, more specifically in the late, lamented Pogo. [more inside]
posted by Guy_Inamonkeysuit on Dec 11, 2008 - 24 comments

The Political Cartoons of Clifford K. Berryman

The political cartoons of Clifford K. Berryman lampooned American politics from the era of Grover Cleveland to the Truman administration. If he's known today it's mostly for having originated the teddy bear. While some of his cartoons have scant relevance today, many remain surprisingly relevant. Of the many historical events he drew there are women's suffrage, the 1948 election and the 1912 Republican primaries between Taft and Roosevelt.
posted by Kattullus on Aug 21, 2008 - 10 comments


The New Yorker interviews Josh Fruhlinger, a.k.a. The Comics Curmudgeon. [Previously.] Josh also writes a weekly political cartoon post for Wonkette, and recently appeared on Jeopardy!
posted by the littlest brussels sprout on Aug 14, 2008 - 24 comments

the tighty whiteys are funny

"Zuda takes the Web publishing aspect out of the creators' hands, freeing them up to focus on writing and drawing the story. But to get Zuda to publish your comic, you first have to win a competition..." A major player enters into the fray of web comics publishing, previously populated mostly by independents. Is this a good thing or a bad thing? [more inside]
posted by ZachsMind on Dec 28, 2007 - 47 comments

Ach, those damn 110 year old kids!

The Katzenjammer Kids* are 110 years old this month, the world's longest running comic. Watch 1918's Policy & Pie (pt. 2), rare animation by creator Rudolph Dirks who lost the strip to William Randolph Hearst in a court case. The strip was taken over by Harold H. Knerr, but Dirks retained rights to the characters and produced a rival cartoon under The Captain & the Kids for Pulitzer papers for several decades. Five artists followed Dirks and Knerr creating the strip for Hearst.
posted by madamjujujive on Dec 27, 2007 - 14 comments

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