101 posts tagged with Comics by MartinWisse.
Displaying 1 through 50 of 101.

"This only happened because people organized"

Following on from the New York Times' expose of nail salons, Sukjong Hong looks at the ongoing attemps to organise workers as well as the reactions of manucurists to the piece (also available in Korean). Sukjong Hong is a freelance writer and artist specialising in the intersection between journalism and comics.
posted by MartinWisse on Aug 28, 2015 - 3 comments

“street-level, real-world kinds of stories.”

In Hawkeye, narrative strategies like the in media res opening, the flashbacks, and the flashforwards are complimented by Fraction and Aja’s use of motifs to thicken individual issues and stories. In #3, two different lists—the “nine terrible ideas” Clint has on the day the story takes place (featured in first-person captions), and a catalog of the trick arrows in Clint’s quiver (featured in inset panels with labels like “Explosive-tip Arrow”)—offer running commentaries on the dominant story. Sometimes Hawkeye’s echoes and callbacks can be very on-the-nose, as in the small panels of Clint praising his boomerang arrow that appear early and late in the story.
For The Comics Journal, Craig Fischer examines Matt Fraction/David Aja's Hawkeye. Warning: spoilers.
posted by MartinWisse on Jul 5, 2015 - 25 comments

Who is ruining comics this week?

And I find it amusing that this “they’re fans of MOMENTS but won’t buy anything” complaint was being made at fans who were at a comic convention. Look, cons ain’t cheap. If someone’s spending their time and money to go to a con or make their own Captain Marvel costume or whatever, they clearly have some kind of passion and fondness for what they’re seeing. No one goes to a con just because they reblogged Unbeatable Squirrel Girl a couple times.
Is Tumblr fandom ruining comics because Tumblr fans "love the characters and love MOMENTS of stories, but don’t read the actual comics ever"? The answer may not surprise you.
posted by MartinWisse on Apr 20, 2015 - 85 comments

Biff! Pow! Zap! There are comics for kids once more

If we were to pick a Person Of The Year for 2014, I think it would be pretty obvious that it would have to be Raina Telgemeier who absolutely ruled the roost with the #1, 3 and 5th best-selling books ("Sisters," "Smile," and "Drama") through BookScan. And it is fairly certain that this is just the tip of the iceberg, as the New York Times reports that "Sisters" has printed more than 1.4 million copies so far, and it only came out in August of 2014!
Raina Telgemeier, who on her own is responsible for 3.6 percent of all book sales reported through Bookscan, isn't the only one making a success of comics aimed at kids: the majority of the top 20 bestselling graphic novels are aimed at kids, Brian Hibbs shows.
posted by MartinWisse on Mar 14, 2015 - 15 comments

Definitely-Not-Filthy Sailing Terminology

Confusing and obtuse it may be... ...but if there's one thing sailing terminology is not, it's filthy. -- Lucy Bellwood puts things straight through the medium of comics. Want more salty seadogging? Down to the Seas is the story of her trip onboard the last wooden whaling ship in the world.
posted by MartinWisse on Mar 5, 2015 - 14 comments

I have twenty-nine million Yamblr followers.

It’s a question where the obvious answer is the right one – new audiences live there. Just as Tumblr is more diverse than the Internet as a whole, so comics fandom on Tumblr is more diverse than comics fandom on IGN or CBR or Newsarama. It’s younger, queerer, more racially diverse and most obviously a lot more female – and those voices lead the conversation, they don’t constantly have to fight to win a place on it. It’s also – perhaps anecdotally, perhaps not – newer to comics.
Tom Ewing looks at the (critical) success of Marvel series like Young Avengers and how it's reaching a new audience, the Tumblr generation looking for "social justice and feels". [more inside]
posted by MartinWisse on Feb 7, 2015 - 27 comments

Again, Christopher Priest put it best: “Hire some actual black people.”

This was not built to last, and as such, these are not changes that disrupt business as usual. The most bigoted fan can go about their Cap- and Thor-loving life largely untroubled by these events, save for a little message board mayhem, and thus these are not changes I care about. Because that’s a large part of the point of writing characters who aren’t straight white dudes: disruption. Making change that cannot be ignored by those who wish they could.
Juliet Kahn isn't impressed by a black Captain America or a female Thor and wants the comics industry to move beyond such gimmicks and promote real change.
posted by MartinWisse on Nov 30, 2014 - 49 comments

Kitty Queer

What I did not know is that Claremont included this sort of girl-on-girl sensuality in all of his comics, hiding it from the CCA as heterosexual female friendship. It wasn’t until 1992 and Davis’s fairly blatant art that I got the hint; actual straight women maybe don’t feel this way about their friends. It was entirely possible, I realized slowly, that finger sucking and licking was not a strictly heterosexual activity among friends.
Chris Claremont, the X-Men, Kitty Pryde, hiding in hindsight pretty blatant lesbian flirting from the Comics Code Authority and telling Rogue you think you might be gay by Sigrid Ellis, editor of Apex Magazine, the Queers Dig Timelords and Chicks Dig Comics anthologies as well as Image Comics' Pretty Deadly.
posted by MartinWisse on Nov 27, 2014 - 23 comments

From Obocop to Lord of the Rigs

Inktober 2014: A daily ink drawing of Reddit's movie title typos. By Austin Light.
posted by MartinWisse on Nov 6, 2014 - 28 comments

The first step is admitting you got a problem...

James Sturm's short comic, the sponsor is perhaps relevant to more people than just cartoonists.
posted by MartinWisse on Nov 5, 2014 - 48 comments

The secret history of alternative manga

Without komaga (literally “panel pictures”), there would have been no gekiga. Moreover, because by the mid 60s gekiga had become lingua franca in comics for adolescent boys and young men, and because without gekiga it is unlikely that the “cinematic” would have become the obsession that it did amongst manga critics and historians, one could also say that without komaga neither manga or its discourse would exist as we know them.

Despite this, komaga’s creator, Matsumoto Masahiko (1934-2005) has only recently been resurrected from the archive. Yet still has his work barely registered within the mainstream of manga scholarship, which remains stubbornly Tezuka-centric in focus.
Ryan Holmberg looks at the work of pioneering manga artist Matsumoto Masahiko and his influence on manga as an artform.
posted by MartinWisse on Oct 24, 2014 - 10 comments

The Streisand effect is alive and well

To date, Mr. Queen is the only artist who has taken this kind of action - other artists and publishers seem to understand Escher Girls & other similar sites are fair use and criticism, and that fan discussion, positive or negative, is important and helpful to their business. (In fact, the creators I’ve interacted with are either fans of EG, or expressed disagreement but know that it’s fan criticism.)
Escher Girls is a blog that exists to criticise and point out the more egregious examples of bad anatomy and sexy contortions to be found in American comics. It was subjected to DMCA takedown notices by cartoonist Randy Queen, perhaps best known for nineties Image Comics classic Darkchylde. Once the news spread, he doubled down by threatening legal action for defamation. As an attempt to stifle criticism, it failed miserably.
posted by MartinWisse on Aug 4, 2014 - 87 comments

Comics has an outrage problem

We use the presence of passion to first diminish and then dismiss arguments. The offended must play by the rules of the unoffended, or even worse, the offenders, in order to be heard. You have to tamp down that pain if you want to get help or fix it. You can see it when people say things like “Thank you for being civil” when arguing something heated with someone they disagree with. Civility is great, sure, but we’re forcing people who feel like they’re under attack to meet us on our own terms. In reality, passion shouldn’t be dismissed. Passion has a purpose.
David Brothers on outrage, passion, civility and being made to feel welcome or unwelcome in the comics community.
posted by MartinWisse on Jul 18, 2014 - 46 comments

Stan Lee and Jack Kirby’s Akira

Ever wonder what some very well known anime/manga characters would look like had they been designed by American cartoonists?
posted by MartinWisse on Jul 14, 2014 - 16 comments

Orientation Police

"I’m gay. I date men. Some of those men have vaginas."
A short comic about dating trans men by cartoonist Bill Roundy, previously featured for his Brooklyn bar review comics. (You may also like his gay romance comics, e.g. this unauthorised Northstar romance.)
posted by MartinWisse on Jul 11, 2014 - 86 comments

On quitting superhero comics

Like…I don’t eat pork. I quit swine in ‘99. I could tear up some porkchops and bacon as a kid, but it wasn’t a struggle to quit pork. I don’t think back like “man, remember how good that porkchop was back in ‘97, second week a May?” But I do that with Spider-Man—the Return of the Goblin arc, his first meeting with Luke Cage, that time Betty Brant said something nice about him and he was like “Dang, i never noticed her before, but she’s cute AND she’s on my side” like a doggone teenaged idiot, Mary Jane going Sibyl to get a soap opera job and dodging stalkers…I can recite it chapter and verse. So cold turkey wasn’t really an option, or rather, I wasn’t in a position where cold turkey was feasible.
On his Tumblr, David Brothers talks how hard and easy it was to give up reading Marvel and DC comics (edited version from his blog)
posted by MartinWisse on Jun 17, 2014 - 70 comments

Logan, even as head chef using your claws to cut vegetables is wrong

That time Wolverine teamed up with "celebrity" chef Chris Cosentino and made fun of vegetarians.
posted by MartinWisse on Jun 5, 2014 - 27 comments

Arnie Roth

Remember when Captain America had a gay best friend?
posted by MartinWisse on May 30, 2014 - 74 comments

When comics were weird and progressive

These days, there’s a broad consensus that the Comics Code — which has been endlessly discussed and condemned by comics historians — was disastrous, and that it damaged comics. But nearly all of the critiques of the Code focus primarily on its dire consequences for white men’s artistic freedom, or the disservice done to readers in coddlingly denying them explicit sex and violence. What’s less discussed is the fact that independent women, and people of color, and all sorts of stories that didn’t fit with the compulsory patriotism and cop-worship of the 1950s, essentially vanished from comics for decades. This is a loss that comics are still wrangling with.
Saladin Ahmed explains how censors killed the weird, experimental, progressive golden age Of comics [more inside]
posted by MartinWisse on May 16, 2014 - 28 comments

"Everybody dies someday - At least I saw Provence first"

"For most of my life my everyday choices were based on the assumption that I could not trust other people. I thought it was my job to foresee and prevent all harms from befalling me. [...] My life has been better since I've accepted two simple facts. ONE: everybody dies (sorry). TWO: I would like to live a little first." -- Don't let fear stop you from traveling, a cautionary comic by Natalie Nourigat, part of her webcomic/travel blog about living in France for a year. You may know Nourigat from her Oregon Book Award nominated autobio college comic Between Gears.
posted by MartinWisse on Apr 22, 2014 - 58 comments

"A place to start a conversation about inequalities of representation"

"The Harvey/Renee Index doesn’t distinguish between the different types of Renees. Any character who can be identified with one or more groups that are currently marginalized based on race, ethnicity, sexuality, or gender is a Renee. Anyone who is white, non-Hispanic, cisgender, straight, and male is a Harvey." -- Diversity in the Big Two's superhero comics being a perennial hot topic, Comics Alliance comes up with a novel way to quickly establish a diversity baseline: the Harvey/Renee index. (Named of course for Gotham's greatest cops Harvey Bullock and Renee Montoya.)
posted by MartinWisse on Mar 18, 2014 - 31 comments

"Ireland at this time had a largely cow-based economy"

"I’ve said this many times before and I’ll say it many times again, but one of the joys of webcomics is their ability to cover every possible subject and fill every conceivable niche. Say, for example, you’re into early Irish literature and you want to read it in comics form. Webcomics are happy to help you out. At this very moment, in fact, there are at least two ongoing webcomics based on the Táin Bó Cúailnge, or Cattle Raid of Cooley, the central epic of the Ulster cycle: Patrick Brown’s The Cattle Raid of Cooley and M.K. Reed’s About a Bull. Thank you, webcomics! You’ve justified the existence of the Internet yet again!" -- Shaenon Garrity reviews two niche webcomics.
posted by MartinWisse on Mar 16, 2014 - 17 comments

"the first manga to be released stateside"

In 1931, at a time when the American comic book barely existed, Henry (Yoshitaka) Kiyama wrote and drew the semi-autobiographical Manga Yonin Shosei, possibly not just the first graphic novel, but certainly the first manga published in the US, written in a mixture of Japanese and English. [more inside]
posted by MartinWisse on Feb 26, 2014 - 3 comments

All the bees for my necklace of enemies

Morally ambiguous honey badgers, or what happens when creative people get bored on Twitter.
posted by MartinWisse on Feb 16, 2014 - 18 comments

Morrie Turner, December 11, 1923 – January 25, 2014

"Morrie Turner, a cartoonist who broke the color barrier twice — as the first African-American comic strip artist whose work was widely syndicated in mainstream newspapers, and as the creator of the first syndicated strip with a racially and ethnically mixed cast of characters — died on Saturday in Sacramento. He was 90. " [more inside]
posted by MartinWisse on Feb 13, 2014 - 20 comments

What's next? Criticial attention to videogames?

Ng Suat Tong presents the best online comics criticism of 2013. Particularly recommended (by me): who white washes the Watchmen.
posted by MartinWisse on Feb 11, 2014 - 23 comments

What's it really like to be in comics

Throughout February, comics blogging giant David Brothers is doing a twice weekly series of interviews for the Inkstuds podcast, talking about "what cartoonists, academics, bloggers, critics, and other people in or adjacent to comics do". The first episode, in which he talks to Jimmie Robinson about Bomb Queen, Five Weapons and surviving in comics, is up now at Inkstuds and Comics Alliance. (Which has a lot of Five Weapons artwork up, so you might want to use that.)
posted by MartinWisse on Feb 6, 2014 - 4 comments

Every morning she reads the comic and kinda gives me critique

Ordinary Bill is a perfectly good comic strip loosely based on creator Will Wilson's and his girlfriend's lives. Last Sunday that connection was more noticable than usual, as Wilson used his cartoon stand-in to propose to her. Fortunately, she said yes.
posted by MartinWisse on Feb 4, 2014 - 35 comments

Desert Island Strips

With Watchmen, The Dark Knight Returns and Maus taken as given, which comics would you take to a desert Island? (part 2)
posted by MartinWisse on Jan 24, 2014 - 63 comments

Forget technique, tricks, cheating, faking

Back in 1986, comics legend Alex Toth did a thorough critique of a Steve Rude Johnny Quest story. He didn't mince his words. (About Toth, Rude)
posted by MartinWisse on Jan 22, 2014 - 15 comments

If you're sick of Garfield and Mary Worth

If the funnies in your local paper have gotten you down, with their limited space and xeroxed gags, why not take the wayback machine to the Golden Age of newspaper strips, courtesy of Gocomics' Origins of the Sunday comics? Started July last year and curated by Peter Maresca, it shows off how sophisticated and beautiful the American comic strip was almost from its birth in the 1890ties .
posted by MartinWisse on Jan 19, 2014 - 15 comments

Bureaucrats and grunts

"One series that I’ve kept up with, however, that doesn’t get enough credit for its cast of active, intelligent females, is B.P.R.D., written by Mike Mignola and John Arcudi, and currently drawn by a rotating group of artists, including Tyler Crook, James Harren and Laurence Campbell." -- Craig Fischer explores some of the female characters in Hellboy and B.P.R.D
posted by MartinWisse on Jan 16, 2014 - 8 comments

The Politics of the Superhero

"This symposium explores the relationship of superheroes to questions of power, ideology, social relations, and political culture. It represents the first time that a political science journal has devoted sustained attention to the superhero genre as it is reflected in the pages of comic books and graphic novels, and on the big screen." -- PS: Political Science & Politics holds a symposium on The Politics of the Superhero. [more inside]
posted by MartinWisse on Jan 14, 2014 - 43 comments

Where does he get those wonderful toys?

"When I first saw Oliver had something called a "Stickum-Shaft Arrow," I worried that it was some kind of Silver Age, Native American racist caricature arrow. Nope! It's just a long, hard shaft he fires at his eventual lover Black Canary, which covers her in sticky goo. No problems there!" -- Rob Bricken looks at Green Arrow and his less than useful trick arrows. Not that Hawkeye does better.
posted by MartinWisse on Jan 9, 2014 - 75 comments

Apparantly I'm now a world champion

"That is not to say that Oglaf depicts a perfect world. There is a dark side to its humor and it can depict humiliations and sex coerced through magic and subterfuge and through dominance. When a king wants his court wizard to transform him to look like the duke so he can sleep with the duke’s wife (a variation on a scene from Excalibur), he realizes it is easier to order the court wizard to transform himself into the duke’s wife and the king fucks him instead." -- Osvaldo Oyola explains the timeless appeal of Oglaf. Not remotely safe for work.
posted by MartinWisse on Jan 8, 2014 - 72 comments

Hands up who wants to see the thriumphant return of Jaxxon?

"Now, nerds have a long memory. I am dead certain that somewhere out there in the great world there are fans who are looking forward to once again buying "real" Star Wars comics. There are probably even a few brave souls who entertain the notion that Marvel will simply pick up with issue #108 (in spirit if not in deed) as if the subsequent thirty years were just a bad dream. " -- As long expected, Marvel will start publishing Star Wars comics again next year. Tim O'Neil looks at what this means from a fannish point of view.
posted by MartinWisse on Jan 7, 2014 - 40 comments

The X-Men are curious (black)

"Simply changing the skin color of the mutants obviously doesn’t address all of the issues around privilege in the Marvel Universe. The visual and narrative sexism that permeates superhero comics remains intact. Some characteristics of white characters also become negative stereotypes when applied to non-white characters. Wolverine is a symbol of wild, untamed, white male power, but when I recolor his skin to imagine him as a person of color, his snarling, predatory aggression reads as a stereotype of wild black men." -- Orion Martin reimagines the X-Men as mutants of colour to make clear why the idea of mutant discrimination as standin for real world issues is problematic. He does so by recolouring some famous X-men images. [more inside]
posted by MartinWisse on Dec 18, 2013 - 104 comments

It’s a Midwestern strip

From 1989, when Calvin & Hobbes was still pretty new, The Comics Journal's interview with Bill Watterson. The interviewer was Richard Samuel West.
posted by MartinWisse on Dec 6, 2013 - 18 comments

What could be better than seeing your favourite wrestlers in comics?

The strange history of WWE wrestling comics.
posted by MartinWisse on Nov 22, 2013 - 1 comment

"Pop Art of a poor man’s country"

Poor Little Rich Boys: The Art of the Mumbai Circulating Library, by Ryan Holmberg, The Comics Journal's resident Indian comics specialist.
posted by MartinWisse on Nov 20, 2013 - 1 comment

From the Annex of Ideas

Starlogged is a "celebration" of all things British and geeky, with a focus on 1972 - 1995 and Marvel UK, especially their early nineties attempt at creating their own superhero line. A true nostalgiafest for people raised on dodgy black and white reprints of American comics and hardcover annuals.
posted by MartinWisse on Nov 5, 2013 - 8 comments

Graphing the Marvel Universe

"He calls this the Tao of Hawkeye. You can’t just have a database around Hawkeye, right? Not if you really want to understand Hawkeye over time. Because Hawkeye isn’t just Hawkeye. He’s also Ronin and Goliath and Clint Barton. Sometimes he’s dead. Oh, and by the way: he started as a villain. Who remembers that? -- Back in the eighties people like Mark Gruenwald and Peter Sanderson guarded Marvel Comics' continuity. These days Peter Olson tries to do the same for a much bigger Marvel using science and math.
posted by MartinWisse on Nov 4, 2013 - 62 comments

The Lighter Side of...

My Friend Dave, twentysix mini essays on Dave Berg, longtime Mad Magazine cartoonist, by Craig Fischer.
posted by MartinWisse on Oct 28, 2013 - 15 comments

No Spandex

Name Five Strong Female Characters Who Don't Wear Costumes And/Or Don't Have Superpowers.
posted by MartinWisse on Oct 20, 2013 - 119 comments

A different sort of hell

"Technically it’s not a book at all: The Great War is actually one continuous drawing, a 24ft-long panorama narrating the British forces’ experience of 1 July 1916, spatially and chronologically, from orderly morning approach to chaotic battlefield engagement to grim aftermath. There are no boxes of text or speech bubbles, no individuated characters, instead Sacco portrays a mass event in painstaking, monochrome, almost technical detail. It’s like a cross between Hergé and the Chapman brothers; the Bayeux Tapestry as a silent movie." -- Cartoonist Joe Sacco's latest project, The Great War is about one particular day in the War: 1 July, the start of the Battle of the Somme. [more inside]
posted by MartinWisse on Oct 18, 2013 - 20 comments

Figuring out George Carlson

"In the year 8113 A.D., the most remembered cartoonist of our time may not be any of our currently revered comics creators. Not Winsor McCay, George Herriman, Jack Kirby, Robert Crumb, Art Spiegelman, or Chris Ware. As incredible as it may seem, long after the last comic books of our time have crumpled into dust, the cartoonist of our era that People of The Future will dig (perhaps literally) could be a guy named George Carlson — an under-appreciated, largely overlooked cartoonist, illustrator, game designer, and graphic artist extraordinaire" -- In a two part series for The Comics Journal Paul Tumey explains why George Carlson is the best cartoonist you've never heard off.
posted by MartinWisse on Oct 16, 2013 - 10 comments

Of course Boomerbutt has a pet koala called Rebound

Like pets? Like DC superheroes? Like Art Baltazar's artwork on Tiny Titans and other kid friendly DC comics? Then you'll love the DC Super-Pets Character Encyclopedia, as reviewed by J. Caleb Mozzocco for Robot 6.
posted by MartinWisse on Oct 15, 2013 - 14 comments

"The Fantastic Four (1961-88) was The Great American Novel"

"The Fantastic Four is the Great American Novel. It is therefore the modern Shakespeare.
The Fantastic Four is an allegory of the most powerful nation in the history of the world, during its triumphant phase: from its first man in space (1961) to the end of the cold war (1988-9). A nation is understood through its art, and the superhero comic is America's unique contribution to art." [more inside]
posted by MartinWisse on Sep 30, 2013 - 66 comments

"the greatest unlauded daily strip of the post war age"

Fawkes always noted that “the cartoonists know me as the one who plays the clarinet. The jazz people say I’m the one who does the cartoons.” -- TCJ's Adam Smith interviews British cartoonist & jazz musician Wally Fawkes, who played with the likes of Sidney Bechet and Humphrey "ISIHAC" Lyttelton. He gave up jazz for cartoons and for forty years was the artist on the classic UK newspaper comic Flook, which featured writing by a host of well known names like George Melly, Barry Took, Compton Mackenzie, Barry Norman and Humphrey Lyttelton again.
posted by MartinWisse on Sep 13, 2013 - 4 comments

Bring me the head of Boba Fett!

In 2002 the Eltingville comic-book-science-fiction-fantasy-horror and role playing club made the leap from the pages of Evan Dorkin's Dork comic into an animated pilot for Cartoon Network's Adult Swim, as Welcome to Eltingville. Sadly the series wasn't picked up, but the pilot is available on Youtube: part 1, part 2, part 3 (bonus title music by the Aquabats. Sadly so far the Northwest Comix Collective hasn't made the same leap.
posted by MartinWisse on Sep 4, 2013 - 21 comments

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