Skip

1612 posts tagged with Comics.
Displaying 151 through 200 of 1612. Subscribe:

It's Hard to Speak About these Things in Public...

So He Drew This Instead. (TW: child abuse)
posted by Kitteh on Nov 19, 2013 - 29 comments

Chomsky-Man?

In the summer of 2012, Jeffrey Wilson interviewed Noam Chomsky.
“When the police came into [Occupy Wall Street] under Bloomberg’s orders and smashed up Zuccotti Park one of the things that they did was destroy all the books. You have got to destroy books that are dangerous. It has a long tradition back to the middle ages. Arizona knows all about that.”
They discussed the Occupy movement (previously) and its roots in previous resistance movements, back to the Civil Right Movement Spanish Civil War. To bring the conversation to a mass audience, he's now publishing the transcript as a comic book. The artwork so far is beautiful. [more inside]
posted by mutesolo on Nov 19, 2013 - 23 comments

Lil' Trickster

Loki's childhood, illustrated.
posted by Artw on Nov 16, 2013 - 25 comments

Übermensch

The 5 Ugly Lessons Hiding in Every Superhero Movie (SLCracked)
posted by fearfulsymmetry on Nov 14, 2013 - 75 comments

Meet the Somalis

Meet the Somalis is a series of short comics depicting the various experiences of fourteen Somali immigrants in cities across northern Europe.
posted by Dim Siawns on Nov 12, 2013 - 21 comments

"World's greatest detective and you still can't figure it out."

An ending for Batman and the Joker.
posted by EatTheWeak on Nov 10, 2013 - 108 comments

You're all, "It's too quiet, guys." Instant weird shit

String Theory is a character-driven serialized comic book published on the web and written/illustrated by Dirk Grundy (Twitter cat feed). Following the adventures of grumpy, socially inept super scientist Dr. Herville Schtein, it is set in an alternate timeline where "the Cuban missile crisis went terribly wrong," the Cold War never ended, super scientists and super powered individuals run amok, the American Southwest is an irradiated postnuclear desert, "America...is not doing so well," and Chicago... Let's not talk about Chicago. It is about failure and families and how we all kind of mess each other up a little, but only because we care. It's kind of sad. But also kind of funny. Think Venture Brothers with the satire and comedy turned down, and the characterization and plotting turned up. Oh! There is also a very cute talking cat, if that helps sell it for you. [more inside]
posted by byanyothername on Nov 6, 2013 - 12 comments

"I’m going to ruin sea otters for you."

Say It With Sea Otters is a blog where adorable cartoon animals deliver difficult messages. Here are some examples: 1, 2, 3, 4 and 5. While the sea otter has a well deserved reputation for extreme cuteness, these aquatic weasels engage in behavior that to humans seems truly reprehensible. Of course, we humans haven't exactly treated them well throughout history. Indeed, the first scientist to describe them, George Wilhelm Steller, emphasized their valuable fur in his description of them.
posted by Kattullus on Nov 6, 2013 - 63 comments

From the Annex of Ideas

Starlogged is a "celebration" of all things British and geeky, with a focus on 1972 - 1995 and Marvel UK, especially their early nineties attempt at creating their own superhero line. A true nostalgiafest for people raised on dodgy black and white reprints of American comics and hardcover annuals.
posted by MartinWisse on Nov 5, 2013 - 8 comments

Graphing the Marvel Universe

"He calls this the Tao of Hawkeye. You can’t just have a database around Hawkeye, right? Not if you really want to understand Hawkeye over time. Because Hawkeye isn’t just Hawkeye. He’s also Ronin and Goliath and Clint Barton. Sometimes he’s dead. Oh, and by the way: he started as a villain. Who remembers that? -- Back in the eighties people like Mark Gruenwald and Peter Sanderson guarded Marvel Comics' continuity. These days Peter Olson tries to do the same for a much bigger Marvel using science and math.
posted by MartinWisse on Nov 4, 2013 - 62 comments

Stalwart And Steady And True

The anti-Communist Captain America was ret-conned into being a crazed history graduate student named William Burnside who had himself surgically altered and then dosed with a flawed version of the Super-Serum, which drove him insane to the point where he saw communist sympathizers everywhere. The subtext isn’t particularly thick here: the “Commie-Smasher” was a paranoid wannabe, whereas the real Captain America is the “living legend of WWII” waiting in suspended animation during the Second Red Scare, who emerges back onto the scene with the arrival of the New Frontier and the Great Society. - Why Captain America Is the Progressive-Era Superhero We Need.
posted by The Whelk on Nov 1, 2013 - 80 comments

Days of Future OH MY GOD THIS IS AWESOME

The first official trailer for 2014's X-Men: Days of Future Past. (slYT)
posted by Kitteh on Oct 29, 2013 - 190 comments

The Lighter Side of...

My Friend Dave, twentysix mini essays on Dave Berg, longtime Mad Magazine cartoonist, by Craig Fischer.
posted by MartinWisse on Oct 28, 2013 - 15 comments

Screen to Page

Five Great Comic Book Adaptations Of Movies (And One That’s Just Really Cool But Kind of Terrible)
posted by Artw on Oct 24, 2013 - 28 comments

No Spandex

Name Five Strong Female Characters Who Don't Wear Costumes And/Or Don't Have Superpowers.
posted by MartinWisse on Oct 20, 2013 - 119 comments

A different sort of hell

"Technically it’s not a book at all: The Great War is actually one continuous drawing, a 24ft-long panorama narrating the British forces’ experience of 1 July 1916, spatially and chronologically, from orderly morning approach to chaotic battlefield engagement to grim aftermath. There are no boxes of text or speech bubbles, no individuated characters, instead Sacco portrays a mass event in painstaking, monochrome, almost technical detail. It’s like a cross between Hergé and the Chapman brothers; the Bayeux Tapestry as a silent movie." -- Cartoonist Joe Sacco's latest project, The Great War is about one particular day in the War: 1 July, the start of the Battle of the Somme. [more inside]
posted by MartinWisse on Oct 18, 2013 - 20 comments

This is everything I know: a 24 comic about comics.

"I'm a professional indie cartoonist, and before that I was an aspiring pro." Spike is the author of Poorcraft, a how-to-live-well-within-your-means comic that many many of us on the Blue really dig.
posted by Kitteh on Oct 17, 2013 - 22 comments

Repetition is the death of magic.

Mental Floss interview with Bill Watterson.
posted by asperity on Oct 17, 2013 - 109 comments

Fat Pony

The book is about a little warrior princess who is given a silly looking pony on her birthday, and it’s not exactly what she wanted … So [the story] is about finding value in something unexpected - Kate Beaton, best known for her Hark! A Vagrant book and website, announces Fat Pony, her new project. Wired Interview.
posted by Artw on Oct 17, 2013 - 38 comments

Figuring out George Carlson

"In the year 8113 A.D., the most remembered cartoonist of our time may not be any of our currently revered comics creators. Not Winsor McCay, George Herriman, Jack Kirby, Robert Crumb, Art Spiegelman, or Chris Ware. As incredible as it may seem, long after the last comic books of our time have crumpled into dust, the cartoonist of our era that People of The Future will dig (perhaps literally) could be a guy named George Carlson — an under-appreciated, largely overlooked cartoonist, illustrator, game designer, and graphic artist extraordinaire" -- In a two part series for The Comics Journal Paul Tumey explains why George Carlson is the best cartoonist you've never heard off.
posted by MartinWisse on Oct 16, 2013 - 10 comments

and if you stare long enough i swear to god it’s pointing to up

Comics writer Matt Fraction writes a heartfelt honest blog entry to a suicidal fan telling them what saved him and what could possibly save them too. [more inside]
posted by Kitteh on Oct 16, 2013 - 32 comments

Of course Boomerbutt has a pet koala called Rebound

Like pets? Like DC superheroes? Like Art Baltazar's artwork on Tiny Titans and other kid friendly DC comics? Then you'll love the DC Super-Pets Character Encyclopedia, as reviewed by J. Caleb Mozzocco for Robot 6.
posted by MartinWisse on Oct 15, 2013 - 14 comments

The Bus.

Paul Kirchner's The Bus is a surreal gag strip that ran in Heavy Metal magazine in the early 80s. It can be bought as a book, but the book is out of print. Here it is on Imgur. Downright scrumptious, old-fashioned flavor with that 70s east-coast anomie vibe.
posted by Nomyte on Oct 13, 2013 - 44 comments

The Walking Dead of Riverdale

Afterlife with Archie is a gorgeous new horror comic featuring Archie, Jughead, Sabrina, and the gang in zombie-filled Riverdale.
posted by Lush on Oct 8, 2013 - 23 comments

Princess Diana of Themyscira

Wonder Woman, a short by Rainfall Films.
posted by Brandon Blatcher on Oct 4, 2013 - 34 comments

10 Things You Need to Know About Asgardians

MediAvengers: Earth's Mightiest Gossip is a blog of media parodies set in the Marvel Cinematic Universe.
posted by brundlefly on Oct 3, 2013 - 19 comments

"Enclosed is a rough draft of a F.F. page..."

Sean Howe digs up "a February 1966 letter from then-Staff Writer Denny O’Neil to Marvel fan Jay DeNatale, [which] includes what’s possibly the earliest insider account of Marvel from someone other than Stan Lee." (via)
posted by griphus on Oct 3, 2013 - 8 comments

I might have stared too long at the paintings

Comics artist Grant Snider's (previously) ongoing series Who Needs Art? is part whimsical introduction, part loving tribute to the great artists and art movements of the 20th century. [more inside]
posted by narain on Oct 2, 2013 - 3 comments

Nancy is Happy

Nancy is Happy. Selected panels from Bushmiller-era Nancy comics.
posted by Greg Nog on Sep 30, 2013 - 41 comments

"The Fantastic Four (1961-88) was The Great American Novel"

"The Fantastic Four is the Great American Novel. It is therefore the modern Shakespeare.
The Fantastic Four is an allegory of the most powerful nation in the history of the world, during its triumphant phase: from its first man in space (1961) to the end of the cold war (1988-9). A nation is understood through its art, and the superhero comic is America's unique contribution to art." [more inside]
posted by MartinWisse on Sep 30, 2013 - 66 comments

Bound so tightly with tension and anger...

Old Marmaduke strips are terrifying.
posted by griphus on Sep 28, 2013 - 31 comments

CHECKSUM ERROR. CONTINUE? (Y/N)

Decrypting Rita is a sci-fi comic with robots. It's pretty cool. Decrypting Rita is a slice-of-life comic with regular people. You might like it. Decrypting Rita is a fantasy comic with dragons and hat ladies. It's a little experimental. Decrypting Rita is set 120 minutes into the future, in the here and now, in your teenage brother's D&D campaign, in a place called the Skylands. It's also scrolly. Decrypting Rita is a comic by mefi's own egypturnash. It's worth reading. [via mefi projects]
posted by ocherdraco on Sep 26, 2013 - 16 comments

Comics of the Damned

Celebrate Banned Books Week by perusing The comics that corrupted our kids - but mind your eyes! Meanwhile the American Library Association’s list of this year’s most challenged books is led by another comic,  Captain Underpants.
posted by Artw on Sep 25, 2013 - 42 comments

Instrument Lights Made the Beads of Sweat Twinkle on His Dark Skin

In 1956 EC Comics attempted to re-publish the pre-Code comic Judgement Day, originally published in 1953 in Weird Fantasy #18, prior to the founding of the Comics Code Authority. The CCA "objected to" the story because of "the central character being black.".
posted by exogenous on Sep 24, 2013 - 13 comments

Give me a stick and I can stay alive!

Discover how to get out of bed and do things again with these spiffy new tips from 21 Comics That Capture the Frustrations of Depression! Or pull a blanket over your head and pretend you're the last person on earth curled up in a nice, warm cave. Whatever.
posted by byanyothername on Sep 22, 2013 - 89 comments

The Derk Isle

The first translation of The Adventures of Tintin into the Scots leid is now available, and is a joy to read aloud. Give it a shot! It was also recently published in Gaelic and Welsh (Yr Ynys Ddu).
posted by shii on Sep 21, 2013 - 22 comments

Podcast from Mike Duncan about revolutions

Revolutions is a new weekly podcast by Mike Duncan, who is best known for the History of Rome podcast, though he also writes comics. There are two episodes so far of Revolutions, a short introduction to the series and one on Charles Stuart, king of England.
posted by Kattullus on Sep 17, 2013 - 34 comments

Focus On the Logo to Boot (First Time?)

Dreamspace is an animated cyberpunk comic-presented-as-visual-novel/adventure-game by artist Cryoclaire (potentially NSFW; artistic nudity) about networked psychedelics, consciousness expansion through underground social networks and gorgeous trippy neon GUIs. Like most cyberpunk fiction, the characters are all sunny, cheerful personalities, everyone has a good time and absolutely no one winds up crippled, dead or insane by the end.
posted by byanyothername on Sep 17, 2013 - 14 comments

"the greatest unlauded daily strip of the post war age"

Fawkes always noted that “the cartoonists know me as the one who plays the clarinet. The jazz people say I’m the one who does the cartoons.” -- TCJ's Adam Smith interviews British cartoonist & jazz musician Wally Fawkes, who played with the likes of Sidney Bechet and Humphrey "ISIHAC" Lyttelton. He gave up jazz for cartoons and for forty years was the artist on the classic UK newspaper comic Flook, which featured writing by a host of well known names like George Melly, Barry Took, Compton Mackenzie, Barry Norman and Humphrey Lyttelton again.
posted by MartinWisse on Sep 13, 2013 - 4 comments

The Phantom Zone

"In comic books, as in the moving image, the frame is the constituent element of narrative. Each page of a comic book is a frame which itself frames a series of frames, so that by altering each panel's size, bleed or aesthetic variety, time and space can be made elastic. Weisinger and Boring's Phantom Zone took this mechanism further, behaving like a weaponized frame free to roam within the comic book world. Rather than manipulating three-dimensional space or the fourth dimension of time, as the comic book frame does, The Phantom Zone opened out onto the existence of other dimensions. It was a comic book device that bled beyond the edge of the page, out into a world in which comic book narratives were experienced not in isolation, but in parallel with the onscreen narratives of the cinema and the television. As such, the device heralded televisual modes of attention." - Daniel Rourke on Superman's Phantom Zone (well, kinda...)
posted by artof.mulata on Sep 11, 2013 - 10 comments

It's a house blend

Darkseid is impressed by Thanos’s coffee.
posted by bswinburn on Sep 7, 2013 - 46 comments

JH Williams III and Haden Blackman walk off Batwoman

In a letter crossposted to both Haden Blackman's and JH William III's website, they announced they are planning to leave Batwoman due to a number of 'eleventh hour changes', including a refusal to have Kate Kane marry her fiancee, Maggie Sawyer. [more inside]
posted by dinty_moore on Sep 5, 2013 - 51 comments

Bring me the head of Boba Fett!

In 2002 the Eltingville comic-book-science-fiction-fantasy-horror and role playing club made the leap from the pages of Evan Dorkin's Dork comic into an animated pilot for Cartoon Network's Adult Swim, as Welcome to Eltingville. Sadly the series wasn't picked up, but the pilot is available on Youtube: part 1, part 2, part 3 (bonus title music by the Aquabats. Sadly so far the Northwest Comix Collective hasn't made the same leap.
posted by MartinWisse on Sep 4, 2013 - 21 comments

Heroes and Villains

Comics Alliance's Andy Khouri and Betty Felon (curator of Best Cosplay Ever) review SyFy's Heroes of Cosplay and talk about narratives of reality TV, Yaya Han and credit and authenticity in cosplay.
posted by Artw on Aug 31, 2013 - 22 comments

The Only Woman Caricaturist

"Mary Williams adopted the name “Kate Carew” and wrote candid, witty interviews with luminaries of the day, including Mark Twain, Pablo Picasso, and the Wright Brothers. She adorned her interviews with her unique “Carewatures,” and often drew herself into the scene. Imagine Oprah Winfrey as a liberated woman caricaturist-interviewer in 1900 and you have an idea of who Kate Carew was. -- The Comics Journal's Paul Tumey rediscovers a cartooning pioneer in the course of a review of a new book about early US comics. [more inside]
posted by MartinWisse on Aug 31, 2013 - 4 comments

How to draw comics the Charlton way

Hey kid! Are you a budding young talent anxious to present your work to the world, but not quite sure how the professionals draw comics? Well, the wise guys at Charlton are ready to help you with their 1973 comic book guide for the artist-writer-letterer.
posted by MartinWisse on Aug 30, 2013 - 21 comments

"Kitchee-koo, you bastards!"

70 years ago today in Philadelphia, PA, a weirdo was born. He grew up in a spectacularly dysfunctional family, angry, alienated and beset by bizarre sexual compulsions, mostly involving girls with giant butts. But following those early years of bitter struggle, he became a celebrated cartoonist, musician and misanthrope whose controversial, hilarious (and just as often despairing) art transformed funnybooks and American society. His name is R. Crumb. [more inside]
posted by Ursula Hitler on Aug 30, 2013 - 45 comments

"The Hero who Created a Thousand Heroes."

"The reason I picked the over-used cliché “behind the lines” for this series is probably going to be pretty obvious. Each month I’m going to take a look at Jack Kirby original pencils and examples of Kirby original art — images that reveal information not in the final newsprint publications. I may also take a look at some scans of Jack’s pencils from the 70s and compare those to the printed books. Mainly I want to focus on Jack’s famous margin notes from his 1960s work so we can get a glimpse into the Jack Kirby/Stan Lee collaboration." -- On what should've been Jack Kirby's 96th birthday, Robert Steibel starts a new column at tcj.com looking at the King's artwork. [more inside]
posted by MartinWisse on Aug 28, 2013 - 16 comments

We're all waiting for the other kids' moms to throw theirs out first

"We talked about how it’s crazy that there is this generation of comics collectors that basically all have the same collection. Exactly the same. Like the one we just saw. And how it’s (basically) worthless. And how those collections were worth real money even ten years ago. Maybe more like 20 years ago. Remember G.I. Joe #2 from 1982? It used to be worth 40 bucks. Now, just a click away, there are 6 used from various sellers starting at 99 cents. Spahr joked that we should have all sold when the market was at its peak in the early ’90s." -- Bad news for those of us who wanted to fund our kids' college funds with our comics collection: even rare comics are worthless now.
posted by MartinWisse on Aug 23, 2013 - 128 comments

hey baby, listen to this!

cats against catcalling inspired a mixtape. (won't someone make a song for these ponies?)
posted by dizziest on Aug 21, 2013 - 8 comments

Page: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 ... 33
Posts