259 posts tagged with Cooking and food.
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Anyone CAN Cook

Anyone CAN Cook [NY Times link] 101 incredibly simple 10-minute recipes from Mark Bittman.
posted by dersins on Jul 18, 2007 - 70 comments

"I will never use garlic!"

Sicilian chef Filippo La Mantia has sworn off garlic. La Mantia says that garlic is a "leftover from when Italians were poor", and feels it is overplayed and unnecessary. Others disagree, like chef Antonello Colonna: "eliminating garlic is like "eliminating violins from an orchestra".
posted by rossination on Jul 14, 2007 - 93 comments

The Horse Crisperer

Hungry in Hogtown may be Toronto's best food blog. This guy goes all-out to recreate his favourite recipes, whether it requires rendering 50 pounds of horse fat to make french fries, or sourcing bunny scalps for a crispy snack. Oh, and his most recent post is about Kool-Aid pickles.
posted by sevenyearlurk on Jul 8, 2007 - 20 comments

I hate cilantro.

Freedom haters wail:
"Cilantro! More cilantro!"
The terrorists win.
- Dstieve
posted by Ambrosia Voyeur on Jun 25, 2007 - 83 comments

Bangcook

Tastier tofu courtesy of Shiok Food, a fantastic Thai cooking blog run by chef and restauranteur madman.
posted by klangklangston on Jun 20, 2007 - 29 comments

Streaming Food Porn

America's Test Kitchen, On Demand | Chowhound Cooking Videos | FOOD Network, Videos on Demand
posted by Dave Faris on Feb 9, 2007 - 32 comments

Soup

Soup has a history. Enjoy this comprehensive history of the humble (and sometimes not so humble) dish. A widely stated "fun fact" is that the earliest soup was made with hippopotamus bones, but fortunately today you have much tastier options. One favorite, chicken soup, is easy to make and really is good for you [pdf] .
posted by Deathalicious on Dec 26, 2006 - 25 comments

Food

FoodCandy. A foodie hang.
posted by liam on Jul 13, 2006 - 18 comments

Not Half-Baked

Baking tutorials are fun. Would you prefer a wood-fired bread baking course? This set has recipes to go along with the delicious looking pictures, and here is a virtual tour through a chocolate factory. Poetry your fancy? Here is a set of haikus soley dedicated to Spam™, and other cooking poems here. Want to make your own sausages? (NSFW, or dog lovers) How about Sushi? Make your own flowers out of vegetables. But don't forget to have fun.
posted by a. on May 28, 2006 - 9 comments

Good night, Miss Lewis

Edna Lewis, the Julia Child of Southern cooking, has passed away at the age of 89.
posted by dersins on Feb 14, 2006 - 11 comments

Cellblock Cafe

Cooking Behind Bars. In 1986, upon my arrival at the county jail, my cooking lessons began. There, I witnessed men using empty toothpaste tubes as spoons, and burning toilet paper to heat up coffee or reheat the food served. Complete with recipes.
posted by gottabefunky on Jan 7, 2006 - 34 comments

Gingerbread House

These amazing gingerbread houses on display in Seattle sent me looking for others. This directory includes tons of pictures, including a haunted house, a millhouse complete with millwheel, the old lady's shoe, a tudor castle, and a Thai temple. Recipes and dimensions for your own modest (and delicious!) abode.
posted by OmieWise on Dec 9, 2005 - 12 comments

Passion of the chef

À la carte explores French cookery in just about every angle one can imagine. Featuring an extensive list of recipes, suggested menus, and in-depth articles ranging from how to plan a meal, to what tools to use, including everything one needs to know about knives. Like Strawberries, & crêpes? Want to know more about ice creams & sorbets? Obsessive is an understatement.
posted by riffola on Nov 25, 2005 - 14 comments

Ted Allen talks

Ted Allen interview! The food and wine expert on Queer Eye has a new cookbook out, and he talks to Slashfood about...well, everything: favorite foods, music, books, beer, birds, and other things.
posted by braun_richard on Oct 20, 2005 - 15 comments

Company Cookbook

The Company Cookbook. Have you ever attended a company potluck? Did you vote on recipes and create a cookbook to send as promo to unsuspecting clients? Warning: If you select to read this post, you take "pot luck" - what was available, not knowing for sure what you might receive. (But be sure that, with this cookbook, it will include shredded cheese). And as a bonus, things you shouldn't bring to the company potluck.
posted by tidecat on Sep 27, 2005 - 13 comments

Chinese food around the world

Chinese food around the world. Ethnic Chinese immigrants worldwide took their cuisine with them. New Yorkers are familiar with Cuban-Chinese restaurants, owned by ethnic Chinese from Cuba who served steam tables of ropa vieja and chuletas right next to the pork fried rice and wonton soup. In Jamaica & Trinidad, Chinese immigrants pioneered jerk chicken lo mein and bok choy & callaloo stirfries.

Or how in Peru, Chinese Peruvians developed their country's restaurant industry and created a national dish, lomo saltado along the way.

But then there's the Indian-Chinese food popularized by the descendants of ethnic Hakkas who moved to Mumbai in the 18th century. Personally, I'm partial to some lollipop chicken or gobi manchurian with a nice, cold Kingfisher.
posted by huskerdont on Sep 22, 2005 - 57 comments

New York Haute Cuisine

The Epicurean online. Charles Ranhofer's 1893 book The Epicurean is available online from the Michigan State University Library and the Museum as part of their Feeding America digital project. Ranhofer was the head chef at Delmonico's Restaurant from 1862 to 1894; he popularized the Escoffier version of French cooking to America, modifying it to take advantage of American foods such as turkey, squash, corn, and Pacific salmon. Besides thousands of recipes, The Epicurean discusses table settings, menus, various methods of presentation, and kitchen management. The book may be downloaded as a PDF in two parts.
posted by watsondog on Sep 11, 2005 - 7 comments

A Practical Explanation of the Principles of Healthful Cookery

Feeding America: The Historic American Cookbook Project "...an online collection of some of the most important and influential American cookbooks from the late 18th to early 20th century." Includes scanned, searchable, and downloadable copies of such titles as "The Virginia Housewife, Or, Methodical Cook," "Practical Sanitary and Economic Cooking Adapted to Persons of Moderate and Small Means," and "Food and Cookery for the Sick and Convalescent."
posted by tpl1212 on Aug 5, 2005 - 7 comments

Shouldn't you cook salmon in your dishwasher?

Shouldn't you cook salmon in your dishwasher? Poaching fish in the dishwasher is a virtually foolproof way to shock your friends, prepare a succulent meal, and do the dishes—all at the same time. Not all of the The Surreal Gourmet's offerings are quite so weird, but they might, as he claims, make you into a culinary hero.
posted by QuietDesperation on Jun 6, 2005 - 20 comments

Gode Cookery

Gode Cookery. A compilation of medieval recipes adapted for the 21st century kitchen. [via Monkeyfilter]
posted by jb on Jun 3, 2005 - 15 comments

feed me better

Feed Me Better Jamie Oliver (UK fat tongued food wizard) campaigns to ban the junk food and get fresh, tasty and, above all, nutricious food back on school dinners menu.
posted by Spoon on Mar 17, 2005 - 47 comments

Hi-fi sci-fi food

It's the future. Now where's my fucking food?
posted by Tlogmer on Mar 4, 2005 - 37 comments

Science of Cooking

Science of Cooking guide resource
posted by Gyan on Feb 27, 2005 - 8 comments

Inkjet sushi

Inkjet sushi - Some argue the kind of molecular gastronomy created by chefs like Moto's Homaro Cantu sucks the soul out of gourmet dining. Others turn it into better cooking for the unwashed masses, while still others turn it into a science project for the kids.
posted by AlexReynolds on Feb 3, 2005 - 21 comments

ooo-mah-mee.

It used to be that there were four basic tastes- Sour, Sweet, Salty, and Bitter. Now there are five. Umami is the fifth. More commonly thought of as "Savory", the taste is connected to receptors that sense Glutamic acid. In fact, the first taste receptor ever discovered was one that interacts with glutamate. While Monosodium Glutamate has gotten a bad reputation, most sources agree that it's relatively harmless, and in fact, does add the "more-ish" type of flavor that is ascribed to umami foods. Foods like mushrooms are high in glutamate, and therefore taste more "umami". Pass the Parmesan cheese, please.
posted by exlotuseater on Jan 7, 2005 - 42 comments

a continuing (culinary) conundrum

"Salt rising bread is, when at it's best, as if a delicately reared, unsweetened plain cake had had an affair with a Pont l'Eveque cheese." There's even a mystery to go along with your (cheese-flavored) bread.
posted by scrim on Nov 26, 2004 - 10 comments

just in time for thanksgiving!

Cooking with Cum. It's been a long time since I've been to a site that rendered me (almost) speechless.
posted by adampsyche on Nov 18, 2004 - 129 comments

Gode Cookery

Gode Cookery: Medieval & Renaissance food & cookery, and more.
posted by hama7 on May 7, 2004 - 8 comments

Low-Carb Cicadas

Cicadas best served sauteed in butter and parsley apparently, or if you want to go more upscale: "The soft-shelled cicada, it's done just like a soft-shelled crab," says executive chef Frank Belosic, describing how freshly molted cicadas should be rolled in flour, pan-fried in olive oil, and finished with a sauce of white wine, butter and shallots.
posted by meehawl on Apr 16, 2004 - 23 comments

The new Atkins?

MMMMMMMMMmmmmmm, Banana Worm Bread....... Most of us would cringe at the thought of eating our six legged friends, but many cultures eat insects as a standard practice. Perhaps we should lighten up and give it a shot ourselves! If one is so inclined there are clubs to join and resources available. Chocolate Chirpie Cookies, anyone?
posted by elwoodwiles on Mar 21, 2004 - 14 comments

Hey good lookin', what'cha got cookin'?

National Men Make Dinner Day is today, gentlemen. What culinary delights will you be whipping up this evening?
posted by debralee on Nov 6, 2003 - 90 comments

IT'S CHAMPION!

The World's Worst Food. "A naked imitation of the Gallery of Regrettable Food", featuring late 50's and early 60's-era recipes from the UK.
posted by LinusMines on Aug 25, 2003 - 15 comments

Wolfgang Puck And Celebrity Chefs

Just Because They're Celebrity Chefs Doesn't Mean They Aren't Damn Fine Cooks: We're all supposed to yawn when it comes to TV Chefs, but that's just as silly as ignoring a writer or an actress because they're famous. Wolfgang Puck's website, for instance, is generously full of the most enticing recipes. On another note, my favourite TV chef, Rick Stein, has online a superb list of UK suppliers. Do you know of any other cuisine auteurs on the Web who are as generous with their savvy? Which chef wouldn't you mind having as your own private cook?
posted by MiguelCardoso on Jun 28, 2003 - 36 comments

"I explain to them that they are in my restaurant. And they must have the flounder the way I make it."

"I explain to them that they are in my restaurant. And they must have the flounder the way I make it."
One of Washington's top chefs draws the line with picky diners. Welcome rebellion or self-important rant? Discuss.
(This is a Washington Post "Live Online" chat. The chef's letter is the first entry; scroll down further for reactions on both sides.)
posted by PrinceValium on Apr 30, 2003 - 174 comments

Science in the kitchen.

Science in the kitchen. It's more star trek then home-ec, the cooking of Blumenthal and the legendary Ferran Adria from El Bulli, brings the chemistry set into the kitchen. Egg and bacon ice cream anyone?
posted by ciderwoman on Mar 31, 2003 - 6 comments

What Price Stars?

We know that the French take their food seriously, and restaurant ratings are a BIG deal over there. But here's a sad illustration of that: famed chef Bernard Loiseau was found dead yesterday of an apparent suicide, and speculation centers around his downgraded rating from the influential GaultMillau guide. Shades of Vatel?
posted by Vidiot on Feb 26, 2003 - 17 comments

Mmm-mmm, good!

"64 grams of fat, 2,090 milligrams of sodium, and enough cholesterol to kill anything that's ever lived." 104% of your USDA daily requirements of saturated fat. 231% of your daily intake of cholesterol. Swanson's Hungry-Man All-Day Breakfast! (Pancakes included.)
posted by crunchland on Feb 25, 2003 - 49 comments

Cooking for Losers

Don't know how to cook? You might find Cooking for Losers helpful, with new tips and recipes every day. Today:
Take one flour tortilla from the fridge and warm it slightly in the microwave. Spread a bit of cream cheese on it. Spread a bit of spicy sweet mustard on it. Top with a few slices of your favorite lunchmeat - pastrami, ham, turkey; this recipe does not work well with tofu products. Roll and consume. May be cut into multiple little rolly-things if more food is desired.
Share your own carefully hoarded recipes and be a guest loser.
posted by elgoose on Feb 16, 2003 - 39 comments

What were they thinking?

The Gallery of Regrettable Food: "Frizzle slices of cooked ham in hot butter, adding 1 1/2 teaspoons of drained prepared horseradish to each 2 tablespoons of butter or margarine. Add cheese." Advertisements, Strange recipes from "the golden age of butter", and just plain weird stuff. Also, I think this guy used to do my tech support. with thanks to Television Without Pity and cakeman
posted by anastasiav on Feb 12, 2003 - 13 comments

The Year In Pizza.

The Year In Pizza is a review of the happenings in one of the worst years ever for the pizza industry; what's touching, and quirky about this corporate industry wrap up is the inclusion of brief memorials for pizza murder victims, those workers slain by hungry robbers for whatever little cash they had on them. It's hard to imagine a "year in printing & bindery" review listing all the victims of industrial press manglings.
posted by jonson on Jan 6, 2003 - 34 comments

Faux Foreign Dishes

Good Ol' Foreign Home Cookin': Mexicans, Italians and other foreigners are just as surprised with what passes for Mexican and Italian food in the U.S. as Indians are to encounter chicken tikka masala or vindaloos in the U.K. Americans and Brits visiting the countries whose cuisines they think they know and love must be similarly surprised. Well, purists be damned! Not only is "faux foreign" cuisine sometimes very tasty (less pretentious than "fusion" cooking, for instance), in some cases (e.g. Tex Mex) it can be a damn sight better than the supposed original. And let no one argue these confusions aren't fun... [Apologies it the post looks funny and full of ampersands and the links don't work: my first no-right-clicking post on a mac...]
posted by MiguelCardoso on Dec 13, 2002 - 74 comments

The Times goes pancake mad.

The New York Times Dining section on pancakes. Not just for Sunday morning breakfast anymore (like we didn't know that already). (reg. req'd, etc.)
posted by PeteyStock on Dec 4, 2002 - 24 comments

Thanksgiving turkey flash animation

Bad Flash! A little respect, gentlemen, please! Er, it's not that I'm a vegetarian, but, just this once, I think I'll stick to the hors-d'oeuvre and the Wild Turkey on the rocks, thank you very much. But have a happy Thanksgiving all the same - and don't let this Flash animation or that NYT registration ruin your appetite!
posted by Carlos Quevedo on Nov 28, 2002 - 1 comment

TASTE THE LOVE

Cooking has never been so endearing.....and I am now certainly a convert to using the internet for recipes. So far I have racked up a madras, pasta and now I'm gunning for casserole recipes. Truly a delicious use of the net, n'est pas? ( first link via FlipFlopFlyin)
posted by Frasermoo on Nov 27, 2002 - 26 comments

"Deep-fried chicken livers, crusty and delicious as any chicken liver ever, anywhere. Utterly wonderful, served with peppered cream gravy on the side."

"Deep-fried chicken livers, crusty and delicious as any chicken liver ever, anywhere. Utterly wonderful, served with peppered cream gravy on the side."
Michael Stern - co-author (along with his wife) of numerous pop-culture classics - pontificates on the subtle joys of roadside diners, collaborative cuisine and comfort food. If all the talk of chicken-fried steak makes you want to hit the road, use his site to hunt down some choice noshing stops. Or just whip up some down-home grub yourself. Personally, I like a big ole pot of ravioli with a ketchup and butter sauce. Mmmm....
posted by Polo Mr. Polo on Nov 4, 2002 - 9 comments

How To Say Yes (Or No) To British Food:

How To Say Yes (Or No) To British Food: Apart from the language barrier (ably demolished by Mike Etherington's magnificent online dictionary), British food has a dreadful reputation all over the world. Yet people who try it, whatever their nationality, often find they enjoy it. If it's properly made, that is. Enter Helen Watson's impeccable and ethnically correct recipes. And those who can't be bothered to cook can always plump for the many ready-made goodies (and some real stinkers) now offered by internet mail order firms. The most promising has got to be, with over 2,500 goodies, the FBC Brit Shop. Unfortunately it's based in Japan and will only start delivering in September. The best of the rest is probably yummy British Delights. My mother's English so I'm obviously biased, but aren't a lot of people missing out on the unique gastronomic charms of the good old United K? Oh yes![FBC link pilfered from the Boing Boing larder.]
posted by MiguelCardoso on Aug 3, 2002 - 63 comments

Food For Thought For Serious Foodies And Would-Be Pros:

Food For Thought For Serious Foodies And Would-Be Pros: Egullet.com is mainly written by professional cooks for professional cooks but obsessive, perfectionist gastronomes like you and I can join in too. It's delightful and delicious; like a MetaFilter for fussy gluttons, over-curious gourmets and gastro-porn addicts. Today, celebrated chefs Dan Barber and Michael Anthony, currently wowing New Yorkers at the Blue Hill restaurant, will be answering questions from hoi-polloi such as ourselves. My question's already in...[ From the August issue of Food and Wine magazine, where Michael Anthony was interviewed as one of the best new American chefs.]
posted by MiguelCardoso on Jul 25, 2002 - 12 comments

Betty Crocker makes it easy to eat well.

Betty Crocker makes it easy to eat well. On her website she has (among other things) a dinner planner, a page that figures out what groceries you need for a given set of recipes, and my favorite, a page where you input your ingredients, and she tells you what you can make with them! Everybody eats, and most of MeFi is just news or pop culture, so I think this is incredibly appropriate. What other uses do MeFites get out of the web, besides news, games, and their daily pr0n fix?
posted by taumeson on Jun 20, 2002 - 18 comments

Very cool artwork made out of pieces of toast of various done-ness. "The toaster toasts and when it does this it reproduces itself." If I had a nickel for every time I made that observation. (via Bifurcated Rivets)
posted by luser on May 23, 2002 - 8 comments

An Anonymous Andalusian Cookbook of the 13th Century.

An Anonymous Andalusian Cookbook of the 13th Century. Because you never know when you'll need to make Marrow Without Marrow (Which No One Will Suspect), forget how to grease your Chicken Called Madhûna, or need to rustle up something for the in-laws (A Dish Praised in Springtime for Those with Fulness and Those with Burning Blood).
posted by obiwanwasabi on Apr 15, 2002 - 16 comments

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