411 posts tagged with Cooking. (View popular tags)
Displaying 151 through 200 of 411. Subscribe:

Related tags:
+ (237)
+ (85)
+ (39)
+ (37)
+ (27)
+ (25)
+ (18)
+ (16)
+ (15)
+ (15)
+ (14)
+ (13)
+ (13)
+ (11)
+ (11)
+ (11)
+ (10)
+ (10)
+ (9)
+ (9)
+ (9)
+ (9)
+ (9)
+ (8)
+ (8)
+ (7)
+ (7)
+ (7)
+ (7)
+ (7)
+ (7)
+ (7)
+ (7)
+ (7)
+ (7)
+ (7)
+ (7)
+ (6)
+ (6)
+ (6)
+ (6)
+ (6)
+ (6)
+ (6)
+ (6)
+ (6)
+ (6)
+ (6)
+ (6)
+ (6)
+ (6)
+ (5)
+ (5)
+ (5)
+ (5)
+ (5)
+ (5)
+ (5)
+ (5)
+ (5)


Users that often use this tag:
AceRock (20)
Trurl (16)
The Whelk (14)
netbros (12)
Egg Shen (10)
Joe Beese (9)
the man of twists ... (6)
dersins (6)
MiguelCardoso (5)
Kattullus (5)
nickyskye (4)
flex (4)
Miko (4)
zarq (4)
quin (4)
mathowie (3)
caddis (3)
jonson (3)
Brandon Blatcher (3)
mudpuppie (3)
OmieWise (3)
Iridic (3)
lalex (3)
reenum (3)
twoleftfeet (3)
mccarty.tim (3)
Celsius1414 (2)
curious nu (2)
puny human (2)
fontophilic (2)
peachfuzz (2)
nax (2)
schmod (2)
Dave Faris (2)
Horace Rumpole (2)
shiu mai baby (2)
Ambrosia Voyeur (2)
jbickers (2)
Greg Nog (2)
Blazecock Pileon (2)
storybored (2)
Lord_Pall (2)
nola (2)
madamjujujive (2)
sotonohito (2)
pieoverdone (2)
Gyan (2)
milovoo (2)
braun_richard (2)
swift (2)
PeteyStock (2)
crunchland (2)

Burgers. Juicy, Juicy Burgers.

Linda's dad is not an adventurous eater. Linda's dad likes hamburgers. All-American juicy hamburgers. Linda doesn't want to cook the same thing for her dad every night. So, Linda decides to introduce her dad to new foods through inventing a NEW hamburger recipe for every country in the world. 192 United Nations recognized countries. Using ingredients inspired by the cuisine of each country but relatively available in most U.S. grocery stores. Enter...the hearty Australian. The piquant Azerbaijan. The sweet and spicy Afghanistan. Each recipe invented for and tested out on Linda's dad. [more inside]
posted by jeanmari on Mar 27, 2011 - 153 comments

 

The spice!

Welcome to Gernot Katzer’s Spice Pages On these pages, I present solid information on (currently) 117 different spice plants. Emphasis is on their usage in ethnic cuisines, particularly in Asia; furthermore, I discuss their history, chemical constituents, and the etymology of their names. Last but not least, there are numerous photos featuring the live plants or the dried spices.
posted by halcyon_daze on Mar 18, 2011 - 28 comments

"It's the only grain that's a complete, perfect protein"

How to cook quinoa with David Lynch. Part 1, part 2. Yes, that David Lynch.
posted by londonmark on Mar 9, 2011 - 34 comments

Perfect Risotto

Engineering the perfect risotto. [more inside]
posted by AceRock on Mar 8, 2011 - 62 comments

Elizabeth David

At Elizabeth David's Table: Classic Recipes and Timeless Kitchen Wisdom "When I go back and read her books now, I feel I plagiarized them. All of it seeped in so much, it's embarrassing to read them now." Alice Waters [more inside]
posted by puny human on Mar 7, 2011 - 11 comments

Key Ingredients

Key Ingredient: in which Chicago chefs grapple with kluwak nuts, geraniums, hops and spirulina.
posted by Iridic on Mar 4, 2011 - 5 comments

The Easy-Bake Oven

The Easy-Bake Oven has inspired some children and mutilated others en route to being immortalized in The National Toy Hall of Fame. But with 100-watt incandescent light bulbs effectively prohibited from manufacture starting in 2012, the suprisingly versatile cooking instrument is being retired in favor of an "Ultimate" model powered by a non-bulb heating element.
posted by Joe Beese on Mar 3, 2011 - 73 comments

Modernist Cuisine

Microsoft’s Former CTO Takes On Modernist Cuisine. [more inside]
posted by AceRock on Feb 25, 2011 - 62 comments

The new school of fish

The Bay Area’s smartest diners, chefs, and purveyors now know (and care) where every cut of grass-fed beef and stalk of pesticide-free produce comes from. Yet nearly all look the other way when fish is on the plate. What will it take to stop the eco-fibbing?
posted by Joe Beese on Feb 4, 2011 - 47 comments

"Nutella is more than just a 'chocolaty hazelnut spread,' it is a way of life."

February 5 is World Nutella Day! [more inside]
posted by dcheeno on Feb 4, 2011 - 64 comments

Modernist Cuisine in 6 Volumes

Modernist Cuisine, a 2400-page, 6-volume lavishly-illustrated and highly-anticipated $625 list price set (available for pre-order) by authors Nathan Myhrvold, Chris Young, and Maxime Bilet, expounds a deeply scientific and avant-garde take on cooking techniques and been praised as the most important cookbook of the last 10 years. Its burger recipe. Its kitchen.
posted by shivohum on Feb 4, 2011 - 156 comments

The Minimalist ends its weekly run

Today marks the exit of The Minimalist from the pages of the Dining section, as a weekly column at least. There may be return appearances, but the unbroken string of more than 13 years and nearly 700 columns ends here. (I’m not leaving the Times family; more about that in a minute.) (previously)
posted by Joe Beese on Jan 26, 2011 - 51 comments

Clifford Doerksen

19th-century newspaper ads for patented stomach cures and digestive aids [...] foregrounded mince pie as the K2 of digestive summits. But for every published warning on the dangers of mince, the newspapers published a poem, essay, or editorial praising it as a great symbol of American cultural heritage or a nostalgic reminder of mother love and better times bygone—or even, as the State of Columbia, South Carolina, asserted in 1901, a beneficial Darwinian instrument that had "thinned out the weak ones" among the pioneering generations.
So wrote Cliff Doerksen in his wonderful, James Beard award-winning article Mince Pie: The Real American Pie. Doerksen not only gives the history of this once most American of foods, he also makes two mince pies from 19th Century recipes to see if they are indeed all that. This is but one of many great articles Doerksen wrote for The Chicago Reader in recent years (links to a selection below the cut). Sadly, Cliff Doerksen passed at the age of 47 just before Christmas. [more inside]
posted by Kattullus on Dec 29, 2010 - 73 comments

European 14th Century Cookbooks

Take oysters, parboile hem in her owne broth, make a lyour of crustes of brede & drawe it up wiþ the broth and vynegur mynce oynouns & do þerto with erbes. & cast the oysters þerinne. boile it. & do þerto powdour fort & salt. & messe it forth.

Three European 14th Century cookbooks: [more inside]
posted by thirteenkiller on Dec 27, 2010 - 46 comments

A Thousand Ways To Please A Husband/Family/Yourself With Bettina's Best Recipes

A Thousand Ways To Please A Husband With Bettina's Best Recipes from 1917. A Thousand Ways To Please A Family. Free online with retro illustrations and stories. [more inside]
posted by melissam on Dec 25, 2010 - 12 comments

A Jessica Harper Holiday

Jessica Harper, whom most mefites will recognize as the star of Phantom of the Paradise and Suspiria, has reinvented herself as The Crabby Cook and recently released a book full of recipes and survival tips. Among the treasures on her YouTube channel: fun with her young relatives in "Christmas Cookie Crisis."
posted by hermitosis on Dec 18, 2010 - 16 comments

KAPOW

Fried GnoccAAAAH! (SLYT, fun starts at about 1:00.)
posted by griphus on Dec 18, 2010 - 36 comments

Tartine

Cool little video profile of Chad Robertson, co-owner, with his wife, Elisabeth Prueitt, of San Francisco's Tartine bakery. Chad is obsessed with bread. [more inside]
posted by AceRock on Dec 10, 2010 - 16 comments

top 10s of 2010

Top 10s of 2010. Each Saturday, we pore through our favorite tips and tricks to find 10 great hacks surrounding any subject, from food and thumb drives to browsers and Wi-Fi. Here are our most popular Top 10s of 2010.
posted by nickyskye on Dec 9, 2010 - 15 comments

What makes a chef great?

Why Are There No Great Women Chefs? In 2007 Michelin awarded French chef Anne-Sophie Pic three stars, making her only the fourth woman in her country’s history to receive that honor (fifty years had passed since the last of her sex had garnered that third sparkler).2 The following year, in the United Kingdom, it was considered breaking news when ten female chefs won any Michelin stars at all...[For] the 2009 James Beard Awards gala... “Women in Food” was the chosen motif, but since only sixteen of the evening’s ninety-six nominees were, in fact, women, it seemed like a cruel joke. In the end, only two of those sixteen went home victorious, out of nineteen winners total...[I]n Bravo tv’s Top Chef Masters competition, a paltry three out of twenty-four American “Masters” were women. [via 3 Quarks Daily]
posted by caddis on Dec 6, 2010 - 131 comments

Bear: the other dark meat

So it turns out that bear can be quite tasty - whether as a roast, boeuf bourguignon, dumpling fillings, or a myriad of other ways. [more inside]
posted by r_nebblesworthII on Nov 30, 2010 - 54 comments

In this case, reaching "Pork Nirvana" could be considered a threat...

What do you get when you combine two pounds of bacon with two pounds of Italian sausage carefully crafted into a woven log of artery clogging doom? The Bacon Explosion.
posted by quin on Nov 18, 2010 - 92 comments

Lemme show you how to cook that.

Another kind of cookbook. For a couple years now, as evidenced by this old English cookbook, or this old French cookbook, or this even older Italian cookbook, recipes have been conveyed with language. Fitting with our age of copious visual information, Katie Shelly has made a cookbook using just illustrations. Eat your heart out.
posted by From Bklyn on Nov 16, 2010 - 24 comments

Playing with Food; Home Edition

Molecular gastronomy - the use of industrial and scientific processes in the culinary arts - has been discussed before, but in the last few years a number of tools and techniques have appeared that make some of the fancy pantsy schmanzy creations of molecular gastronomy possible for the home cook... [more inside]
posted by twoleftfeet on Nov 7, 2010 - 26 comments

wonderful magical animal

Rob Levitt of Mado in Chicago butchering a pig. 19 more videos submitted by chefs and butchers to Protein University, a project that aims to "create an online resource populated with a family tree of butchery techniques from whole animal breakdowns to sausage making from across the globe". [more inside]
posted by AceRock on Oct 14, 2010 - 15 comments

Slaving Over a Hot Oven All Day

Chris Kimball prepares a 12-course meal from Fannie Farmer's 1896 cookbook. Using only a coal stove and other authentic Victorian-era kitchen staples, the chef, who lives in Fannie Farmer's former home, recreated a classic holiday Victorian meal from her iconic 1896 cookbook.

The twelve courses included: "rissoles (filled and fried puff pastry), mock turtle soup with fried brain balls, lobster à l’Américaine, roast goose with chestnut stuffing and jus, wood-grilled salmon, roast saddle of venison, Canton punch, three molded Victorian jellies and a spectacular French-inspired Mandarin cake."

Chris Kimball is the creator of public television's America's Test Kitchen) and Cook's Illustrated. Naturally, he chronicled the experience in a book, aptly titled, Fannie's Last Supper. In it, he offers some moden adaptations of Fannie Farmer's recipes. A film depicting the difficulties of authentically re-creating the meal airs this Fall.
posted by misha on Oct 6, 2010 - 45 comments

The 36-Hour Dinner Party

Here's the conceit: Build a single wood fire and, over the course of 30-plus hours, use it to roast, braise, bake, simmer and grill as many different dishes as possible — for lunch, dinner, breakfast and lunch again. The 36-Hour Dinner Party by Michael Pollan
posted by AceRock on Oct 6, 2010 - 35 comments

The Geometry of Pasta

The Geometry of Pasta. If you click on a shape, on most of them, it tells you a bit of history and recipe suggestions. l Pasta shape names l Recipes l Farfalle (butterflies/bow-ties) with Prosciutto and cream animation. The geography of pasta l The origins of pasta. Glossary. More pasta shapes. [more inside]
posted by nickyskye on Oct 1, 2010 - 29 comments

But can she speak Swedish?!

She’s an Iron Chef. The Executive Chef of Bon Appetit Magazine. The founder of Chefs for Humanity. A UNICEF spokesperson. The winner of a 'Hero Visibility Award' from the Human Rights Campaign. And now, celebrity chef Cat Cora is teaching the Muppets to cook. Two new video series have premiered online: "The Muppets Kitchen" and "Hasty Tasty Cooking Tips with Cat Cora and the Muppets." (Warning: autoplaying videos.) The series are "designed to inspire kids to get involved in the kitchen and to help moms prepare simple, nutritious and most importantly delicious dinners." [more inside]
posted by zarq on Sep 15, 2010 - 36 comments

Serving the Lifestyle

Friday food sites for your weekend feast. eatingRD — from a registered dietician · A Conscious Feast — features cooking for company · Steamy Kitchen — focusing on fast, fresh, and simple Asian · Veggie Belly — something for the vegetarians. If that isn't enough, try Project Foodie, a one-stop, independent recipe search site with over 100,000 recipes all in one place. All found because of this cute trailer for Baked Explorations.
posted by netbros on Aug 20, 2010 - 4 comments

Oh! That's what they mean by browned...

For the more visually-directed chef: CookBlast - a search engine for cooking and recipe videos. [via mefi projects]
posted by The Whelk on Aug 15, 2010 - 2 comments

I Call it Catsup. You Call it Ketchup

Got a lot of tomatoes? Looking for some thing different to DIY? How about DIY ketchup? "Whether it's pickles or preserves, DIY food is all the rage. But when I told a group of food-loving friends that I was planning to make my own ketchup, their response was muted. First, there was an awkward pause. Then, one piped up with the question that everyone must have been thinking: Why? Ketchup, apparently, is an exception to the everything-is-better-if-you-make-it-yourself ethos. "
posted by Xurando on Aug 11, 2010 - 61 comments

It doesn't need to be pretty, it needs to be good.

[Cooking Filter] Serious Eats' Kenji Lopez-Alt explains what to look for in a meat cleaver.
posted by BZArcher on Aug 11, 2010 - 20 comments

Cooking Issues

Cooking Issues (mentioned here and here previously), from French Culinary Institute Instructors Dave Arnold (previously) and Nils Norén (former Executive Chef at NYC's Aquavit and Top Chef Masters participant) is a blog exploring cutting-edge cooking techniques. While some techniques they describe require expensive and specialized equipment like liquid nitrogen dewars, a 1750°F custom-made loggerhead (also profiled here), a wet grinder (for ketchup "chocolate", of course!), or a turkey whose leg bones have been replaced with aluminum tubes through which an immersion circulator pumps hot oil, many others are well within the reach of the motivated home cook: gin-infused cucumbers, clarifying lime juice with agar, using enzymes to dissolve citrus pith for zest and supremes, quick-infusing liquor with a whipped cream maker, or making the world's best french fries (part 1, part 2). Here they are demonstrating some of their techniques on Late Night With Jimmy Fallon. [more inside]
posted by joshuaconner on Aug 11, 2010 - 25 comments

How to Microwave Gourmet Popcorn in a Brown Paper Bag

How to Microwave Gourmet Popcorn in a Brown Paper Bag.
posted by swift on Aug 9, 2010 - 52 comments

Alexis Soyer, Famine Soup, and the Magic Stove

Alexis Soyer lived quite an an amazing life. According to his wiki, he "was a French chef who became the most celebrated cook in Victorian England" who also "during the Great Irish Famine in April 1847, ... invented the soup kitchen and was asked by the Government to go to Ireland to implement his idea. This was opened in Dublin and his "famine soup" was served to thousands of the poor for free. Whilst in Ireland he wrote Soyer's Charitable Cookery. He gave the proceeds of the book to various charities. He also opened an art gallery in London, and donated the entrance fees to charity to feed the poor." And then there is also the remarkable story of Soyer's Magic Stove.
posted by puny human on Jul 30, 2010 - 16 comments

Cooking the In-N-Out Animal-Style Double-Double at home

Cooking the In-N-Out Animal-Style Double-Double at home [more inside]
posted by Joe Beese on Jul 28, 2010 - 41 comments

My metafilter is sometimes bitter and dense. Is there anything I can add to it to make it lighter?

cooking.stackexchange.com is the first non computer based Q&A site in the ever expanding stackexchange universe. If you want to know how to chop onions without crying, find out what a roux is or find the best meat replacements for vegetarians, then this may be worth a look-see.
posted by seanyboy on Jul 16, 2010 - 26 comments

Retro Recipe Attempts

Retro Recipe Attempts : Sit back with your Hot Dr. Pepper, munch on a bit of Pie Plate Salad, and start cooking! Brought to you by the fine folks at Mental Hygiene.
posted by gwint on Jul 14, 2010 - 29 comments

Hippy Kitchens

Hippy Kitchens are often happy kitchens.
posted by dchase on Jul 12, 2010 - 50 comments

Bittman bites again!

Mark Bittman's 101 Fast Recipes for Grilling. [more inside]
posted by lalex on Jun 29, 2010 - 38 comments

Burnt to a crisp, or bloody as hell?

A history of well-done meat in America. "I prefer my meat cooked through, gray, no trace of pink. Shoe leather? To me that signifies 'food safety.' Mine is the hockey-puck, the charcoal, the hunk of tuna that is still on the grill. Gourmands consider well-done timid, even cranky. It's the gradation of people who don't really like to eat."
posted by mr_crash_davis mark II: Jazz Odyssey on Jun 17, 2010 - 162 comments

The Italian Art of Living

Sit back and enjoy the many Italian recipes Great Chicago Italian Recipes.com has to offer. This site will provide you with a culinary adventure into the world of Italian food and wine. Choose from poultry, beef, vegetables, pasta, and sooo much more. Looking to finish off that perfect meal? Try Adriana's Italian Gourmet Cookies. [more inside]
posted by netbros on Jun 17, 2010 - 15 comments

Marcella Hazan

Marcella Polini Hazan, Cavaliere della Stella della Solidarietà Italiana, has Lifetime Achievement Awards from both the James Beard Foundation and the International Association of Culinary Professionals. She's also got one of those "cooking every recipe in her book" blogs.
posted by Joe Beese on Jun 14, 2010 - 16 comments

It's a clam, in case you're wondering.

From the French cooking show Des Kiwis et des Hommes, a highly educational segment on how to prepare palourde royal. Kinda sorta NSFW.
posted by Shepherd on Jun 4, 2010 - 34 comments

Balls-out Cuisine

A newspaper story about cooking testicles, featuring Chris Onstad, writer of Achewood. Also featuring an excerpt from his new Achewood cookbook, in which everyone's favorite Appalachian serial killer teaches us how to easily cook fried chicken. (Perfect fried chicken, previously on metafilter)
posted by Greg Nog on May 30, 2010 - 42 comments

Beer Cooler Sous Vide

Beer Cooler Sous-Vide can produce restaurant quality results, without expensive lab equipment. All you need is a beer cooler and an accurate thermometer and you can make perfectly medium rare steak with a great sear, moist and tender chicken breast , and flavorful salmon. [more inside]
posted by AceRock on May 7, 2010 - 56 comments

Make your own Pop Tarts!

Make your own pop tarts! Make your own Reese's! Make your own Snickers! Make your own Egg McMuffin!
posted by mccarty.tim on May 1, 2010 - 43 comments

MacaronFilter

Here are three first approaches [PDF] to the macaron. [more inside]
posted by Iridic on Apr 25, 2010 - 44 comments

Mushroom Sex

"People who use sows to hunt for truffles often find it hard to prevent a sex-crazed animal from eating the truffle she has found and may lose fingers in the attempt." (via) The NYT on decoding the genome of the Périgord Black Truffle . Attempts to make truffles cheaper and more accessible in the past have been met with some resistance.
posted by The Whelk on Mar 30, 2010 - 32 comments

Page: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 ... 9